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  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 1 hour 35 min ago Blog entry Mark Davis
    Thanks, Alex. That Facebook site is not related. Apparently the above link doesn't work directly. Try www.retreatrealty.net Then go to Available Properties then Improved Homesteads and finally Great Prepper Homestead Property near Fontana Lake. Feel free to contact me directly for additional information.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 2 days 6 hours ago Blog entry Mark Davis
    Mark:  The link doesn't show anything.   As a perhaps related aside, there's this Facebook page:   https://www.facebook.com/stayalivebefree/    
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 5 days 30 min ago Web link strike
    Also of interest:   https://mises.org/blog/millennials-love-free-markets-dont-understand-them    
  • D. Saul Weiner's picture
    D. Saul Weiner 5 days 23 hours ago Web link Serenity
    I should have also mentioned that the problem is not limited to dirty electricity generated at its source. It is also generated by many of the modern "devices" we use. It arises when the devices do things to interrupt the flow of electricity. So part of the solution to these problems is going to involve changes in how technology is designed or utilized. But this is unlikely to happen until there is a greater awareness of the significance of the problem.
  • D. Saul Weiner's picture
    D. Saul Weiner 6 days 1 hour ago Web link Serenity
    My understanding is that these spikes can be mitigated. They already are, to some degree, so that the electricity does not damage the generating equipment. That said, I am far from an expert on electricity, so I can't offer more of a response here. Milham mentions Sweden during one section of the book. I left it out of my article to keep things brief, but it is a really interesting and important discussion. There has been a paradox noted by economists for several decades: mortality has been increasing during recent recessions, whereas you would expect the opposite to be the case. There is data from Sweden showing that mortality went up during recessions prior to electrification and then the pattern changed after electrification. This strengthens the case that the data that Milham compiled represents causation, not simply correlation. This also resolves the paradox that has long puzzled economists: greater production corresponds to higher exposure to dirty electricity. I would recommend reading Dr. Milham's book, which is short, accessible, and only costs a few dollars on Kindle. He has also done some pretty interesting research subsequent to the publication of his book. For example, he published a really ingenious study which implicates dirty electricity in the obesity epidemic. When you read articles about addressing the obesity crisis, this issue simply is not on anybody's radar. There are links to his recent papers on his website.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 6 days 4 hours ago Web link Serenity
    In your article, Saul, you mention Mr Milham's finding that health has been significantly impacted by spikes in high-voltage electricity. Are such spikes unavoidable in electrical grids?   If so, it's curious that Sweden, a country in which electrification took place faster and several decades earlier than perhaps any other, has a life expectancy four years longer than the USA. It also has had socialized medicine since 1955. Correlation, of course, does not prove causation.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 6 days 4 hours ago Web link Serenity
    Sorry - reposted as a reply.
  • D. Saul Weiner's picture
    D. Saul Weiner 1 week 4 hours ago Web link Serenity
    "Might you agree, though, that licensure inhibits improvement in health, rather than absolutely decreasing it?" I do not think that such a statement is true in all cases. There have been numerous instances of medical practice regressing and I think that a lot of them are due to the existence of a medical cartel which was promoting its own interests at the expense of patients' health. It is difficult to draw conclusions about the relationship between life expectancies and the performance of the health care system, because there are many other factors which have a bearing, and frequently a decisive one. The primary reason for the large increase in life expectancy during the 20th century for the U.S. was the decline in mortality from infectious disease. And that decline is largely attributable to improvements in sanitation. Life expectancy is also affected by levels of prosperity, which have generally increased since 1900. I recently wrote this article which discusses life expectancy, among other things, and you may find it to be of interest. https://www.lewrockwell.com/2017/05/d-saul-weiner/diseases-of-civilization/  
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 1 week 7 hours ago Web link Serenity
    Might you agree, though, that licensure inhibits improvement in health, rather than absolutely decreasing it?   I looked at this article about life expectancy at birth, and saw that during the 20th Century it rose by 30 years. That's not trivial, and no doubt results from giant leaps in medical science.   It also says that recently, the statistic has fallen slightly. Perhaps that results from a mounting congestion of the health-care delivery system. However it notes that some other countries show a longer life expectancy, including France, Iceland, Italy, Singapore, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland (at 83 each, vs. 79 for the US.) Most of those countries have a system even more tightly controlled by government than we do.   So, do these figures support your conclusion?  If not, there are still powerful arguments against licensure: that freedom of choice is even more important than health, and that price is a vital part of the choosing.
  • Serenity's picture
    Serenity 1 week 1 day ago Web link Serenity
    That is absolutely true. Licensing is about restricting knowledge and information. Restricting the trade to a select few determined by the State and its Institutions. Elimination of liberty. not the enhancement. people die at a rate that should be alarming but for reason it is ignored. Thousands of people every year die at the hands of the medical establishment and the legal drug industry. This isn't about protection. it is about elimination of choice. Taking away people's ability to decide for themselves. Today, In fact , people are forced to use ''Licensed'' Doctors. The procedures those Licensed professionals decide upon are frequently forced on their willing victims at the point of a gun.  Rarely do these professionals cure a disease or illness. They don't make money with healthy people. They need a sick people to 'treat'. Licensing gives them the legal right to do this to people. Licensing has eliminated health by destroying choice and giving power to people who should never have it.
  • D. Saul Weiner's picture
    D. Saul Weiner 1 week 1 day ago Web link Serenity
    Not sure why the people protesting occupational licensing give a pass to the doctors, in the name of "health and safety". Medical licensing has made the practice of medicine far more dangerous than it would otherwise have been. Not to mention, far more expensive.
  • James Clayton's picture
    James Clayton 1 week 4 days ago
    Fear
    Page Paul Hein
    Paul, Fear is one way that your Rulers can obtain the consent of their subjects, but consent can be more effectively engineered and/or purchased; and perhaps it shouldn't even be called consent if it has been obtained through intimidation or deception.
  • ReverendDraco's picture
    ReverendDraco 1 week 6 days ago Web link A. Magnus
    What a coincidence - I consider drones over my home to be "enemy combatants" to be destroyed on sight.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 1 week 6 days ago
    Fear
    Page Paul Hein
    Larken's book is magnificent, and as you may have noticed, I selected it for recommendation on almost every page of the QuitGov site. But to suggest that he is so complacent as  "not to spend time or angst in attempt to change others" is a serious misrepresentation. Why do you suppose he wrote the book?   Having become convinced that government is a dangerous superstition, it is clearly of paramount importance to end its miserable existence at the earliest opportunity. Otherwise, it will certainly destroy us, or our children and theirs. I love my family, so want to terminate it A.S.A.P.   At the end of my Blog today, I asked this question, which seems appropriate here: "Some say [that] cannot be done, the task is impossible, or that it will take centuries. To those, I pose the question 'What, then, are you doing here, wasting your time on an impossible dream?'"  
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 2 weeks 2 hours ago Web link A. Magnus
    And why, pray tell, would politicians NOT follow the money??? https://www.opensecrets.org/lobby/top.php?indexType=s Sam
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 2 weeks 7 hours ago
    Fear
    Page Paul Hein
    Another fine article, Paul. Fear is certainly how today's rulers gain "consent", but back when the FedGov began was there not a different factor in play: deceit?   What I mean is that the 39 lawyers and politicians who set things in motion fooled the people into thinking that this new country would be run by representatives of the people themselves. Hence the opening words, "We the people..." Hence their echo today, the oft-heard "We are the government."   Reality was quite different, especially if one accepts my theme in 1789 - that from the get-go, it was always planned that ultimate power would reside in the judiciary.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 2 weeks 1 day ago
    Fear
    Page Paul Hein
    Nice essay, Paul! Have just finished a private "edit" of Larken Rose's "The Most Dangerous Superstition" (the downloadable text version was ridden through with errors, and I found myself changing some wording -- copy for my own use only). Rose once again has reinforced my ongoing mantra that I can be free. Here. Today. Where I'm "at". I'm convinced that many "libertarians" will not agree with that, pointing to the slave-like conditions you outline. But, in my book, that's the challenge for the men and women of freedom. To sidestep and circumnavigate the beast and remain free in the process. Not to spend time or angst in attempt to change others. Once on these forums I had an interesting interchange with our old friend, Suverans (now disappeared from STR I think -- at least haven't seen any comments from him). I had made the above declaration, referring to myself as a "sovereign state". I had made an analogy of the rattlesnake -- that, in order for me to be free I do not need to rid the woods of snakes, but I need to wear tall boots and heavy gloves to the woods and be careful where I sit and/or reach (was bitten as a young man -- the doc declared me "immune for life" from snakebite; which I still doubt). I commented, "I am not free to walk barefoot in the woods!" So, Suverans responded (in part): "no, Sam! You ARE free to walk barefoot in the woods!..." And, with that, he exposed the soft underbelly of many, many "libertarians" -- that, somehow, someway, we only attain "freedom" at the behest of the white man. That he must be "dissed" or "changed" or "outed" in order for me to be free. Larken ascertains that any of us can be free by simply exorcising that dangerous superstition called "authority". Sam
  • Darkcrusade's picture
    Darkcrusade 2 weeks 6 days ago Web link Don Stacy
    Cops have always been robbers they are paid from stolen monies.
  • Darkcrusade's picture
    Darkcrusade 2 weeks 6 days ago Web link Westernerd
    http://www.suijurisforum.com/american-jubilee-that-wasn-t-t632.html SHAYS> In April and May of 1787 star chamber "courts" tried captured Shays insurgents. Among these, John Bly and Charles Rose were hung "Whenever any encroachments are made either upon the liberties or the properties of the people, if redress cannot be had without, it is virtue in them to disturb government." In some cases the very act of resistance is so significant it is itself an achievement. By fighting the tyranny emanating from within, the farmers of western Massachusetts confirmed their ancient heritage of unending struggle for freedom.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 3 weeks 2 days ago
    Demand and Supply
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    Interesting!  That's cool you're a welder.  You may have read my previous piece here?  :-)   http://strike-the-root.com/light-metal-shadow-freedom-of-welding    
  • newjerusalemtimes's picture
    newjerusalemtimes 3 weeks 2 days ago
    Demand and Supply
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    Yeah, I've argued recently at a prominent welding forum, which is slanted toward a mercantilist attitude, that a North American importer (Everlast) of Asian welding units, and the Asian producer itself, is "anticipating" market demand with a sort of Black Swan event in the welder market for a multi-function MIG, Stick, and AC/DC TIG unit to be released in the next 30 days. There hasn't been one before. Miller came close with an AC/DC TIG unit (the inverter Syncrowave 210) that does MIG only via a spool gun, but at more than $3000, when delivered and outfitted for that. The Everlast All-In-One 221Sti unit will be about $2000 or more, delivered, tax-free, outside the Alta California taxing zone. http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?651371-Sensational-New-All-In-One-M... http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?703381-Everlast-221-rumors-Everlast...
  • Darkcrusade's picture
    Darkcrusade 4 weeks 15 hours ago
    A Moral Compass
    Page Paul Hein
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FtgKRpjVXSg https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mQqySz8Ihho https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kasiov0ytEc
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 4 weeks 1 day ago
    Ode to Japan
    Page Mark Davis
    In the center of the bottom row on this page, there's a link to Larken's magnificent book. Well said, Sam.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 4 weeks 2 days ago
    Ode to Japan
    Page Mark Davis
    Having been enslaved in my youth by a group of psychopaths hiding under the gigantic superstition called "government" (the religious doctrine: "drafted into US Army"), I've spent 70+ years coming out from under the xenophobia that besets youngsters when so directed by groups of "leaders" who make up the military religion. Therefore, I've refrained from comment on Mark's nice essay regarding the strip of islands they're calling "Japan". I don't know what to say. Mark is the only member of STR I've had the pleasure of meeting in person -- in an all-too-brief breakfast we shared in April of this year. Mark invested that couple of hours in face of a 500+ round-trip business venture he needed to complete the same day. I look to Mark as a genuine leader. I feel deeply honored at his willingness to cut into that grueling schedule to meet and become acquainted with me. Too often I think it's tempting for "libertarians" to overlook the dichotomy between ordinary folks going about their daily activities, and that group of lunatics who proclaim to be "leaders" to those folks. And, sadly, long as there is a demand for "security" there will be a supply of psychopaths to make security seem viable. That's why I've become so adamant about use of language. I never say "...Japan went to war with Korea...", etc etc. I believe what Mark said in an essay some ten years ago: "...if you're going to be free, you need to start acting free..." (don't have his exact words with me at the moment). Japan doesn't exist. People exist. Japan has never attacked Korea. I strongly suggest a reread of "The Most Dangerous Superstition". I'm at the library compooter and don't have a link to the free pdf and/or text version(s) available to anybody who googles 'em. Larken Rose slays the dragon in the first 20 or 25 pages, then spends the next 100 or so beating him to a pulp; but it's worth examining again. Sam
  • James Clayton's picture
    James Clayton 4 weeks 2 days ago
    Ode to Japan
    Page Mark Davis
    Mark, You make some interesting observations. As you said, “A harmonious society can foster trust between a growing network of individuals as many become inclined to believe that others are honest and well-intentioned.” Perhaps trust is a default strategy for humans. As you also point out, “Leaders are not only a natural social arrangement, but a necessary one if a group is to be successful in attaining common goals for mutual benefit”, and we can see that voluntary hierarchies do exist where leaders inspire confidence and cooperation. But “a resulting leadership vacuum will be filled with leaders who take control using violence. […] When choosing the alternative of violence to maintain leadership authority, it is obedience that is venerated,” and this can lead to “coercive hierarchies where the threat of violence is the modus operandi for forcing obedience.” Some aggressive people do gather together in that thing called the state or government, and they attempt to persuade the rest of us to think of government as part of our larger group, so that they might exploit our “natural tendency for in-group preference” and take advantage of our trust. If “society is a grouping of individuals with general tendencies reflected in their culture” and culture is essentially the social behaviour and norms of a particular group of people, then it might be inevitable that aggressive people who have assumed leadership in a society will contribute to the formation of an aggressive and neurotic culture, and these parasitic individuals may indeed “purposely increase levels of neuroticism in society to maintain power over people’s minds.” I think most people would agree that mutual non-aggression is mutually beneficial, but coercion, intimidation and deception can provide some advantages for some people in some instances. And as long as they think they are reaping sufficient rewards (wealth, power, status) then they probably won’t be too concerned about virtue, honor, dignity, harmony, liberty, or voluntary hierarchies. As Murray Rothbard stated in his introduction to 'The Politics of Obedience' by Étienne de La Boétie, “consent is engineered, largely by propaganda beamed at the populace by the rulers and their intellectual apologists” and “general public support is in the very nature of all governments that endure.” [Consent that is engineered hardly seems like consent, but that’s a minor point.] And there will probably always be plenty of people who will be deceived, intimidated, coerced, controlled, taxed, registered, censored, drafted, incarcerated, deported, etc., and who will continue to conform, comply, obey and submit – but they might not feel too good about themselves. To quote you again, “Ultimately it is up to individuals to choose how to behave on a daily basis even though those choices are largely determined by influences beyond individual control.” We probably can’t choose our genes and we might not always be able to select our environment(s), and individually we might not have much of an effect on society, but we can presumably make some choices about our thoughts, words and deeds and we can all probably some take action here and now to deal with aggressive behaviour. As you said, “it comes back to attitude, something we can control in our interactions with others.” And maybe our attitude is the only thing that we can choose in some instances. James  
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 4 weeks 4 days ago
    A Moral Compass
    Page Paul Hein
    Paul, you're right to deplore relative moral standards, but I'm surprised you commend the Christian moral compass instead of the anarchist one.   There are some remarks about the latter in my STRticle Ethics, Religion and Freedom. I think it's a greatly superior standard. The old Christian one tolerated, for example, the great evil of government; the idea that one group of people can properly rule another.   You also deplore transgenderism, if I read your article correctly. Might you also oppose homosexuality? If so, it might be worth revisiting the matter. I'm reluctant to use the word "gay" because those who are homosexual by nature often do their utmost to break free of it and are deeply unhappy with their lot; that seems to me the opposite of "gay." But whether the bias is inbuilt or freely chosen, the individual is his or her own sovereign, and does not deserve belittlement by anyone else - least of all, by libertarians.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 5 weeks 5 days ago
    Ode to Japan
    Page Mark Davis
    Hannah Reitsch, yes, one tough lady. Too bad she didn't fulfill her first ambition, to be a missionary doctor.   Adapting the V1 to make it pilotable could have been done. It was driven by a pulse-jet, so was not strictly a rocket, and flew at around 400 mph. When the fuel ran out, it crashed and exploded. Folk on the ground could hear it coming (the pulse frequency was comparable to a loud motor bike) and if the noise stopped when the device seemed to be overhead, it was important to duck. Once spotted, Spitfires had no trouble shooting them down.   There's a great, classic movie called Green for Danger, in which V1s play a part.   The V2 was an early missile, rocket-fueled, whose path took it above the atmosphere. There was no warning of its approach and the explosives aboard were much more powerful. One fell within a mile of where I once lived.   Both were effective terror weapons, designed to scare the population; had they been deployed a year earlier and in greater numbers the war might have ended differently. Neither could be aimed accurately, a weakness Hannah's idea would have corrected for the V1.  
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 5 weeks 6 days ago
    Ode to Japan
    Page Mark Davis
    Thanks for the link on the fighter pilots ramming planes, I learned something new. But here is what I was referring to: http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/test-pilot-reitsch-pitches-su... I couldn't find the original article I read about it, I know that the V2 was a rocket, but it mentioned these test pilots and early jet planes that were essentially rockets with wings. They were going to adapt left over V1s that had even worse guidance than the V2s which couldn't hit targets WAD.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 6 weeks 1 day ago
    Ode to Japan
    Page Mark Davis
    Thanks Mark. Minor correction: the V2 was a rocket, not a plane; see here. There was neither room for nor need of a pilot. Possibly you were thinking of Sonderkommando Elbe, a group of fighter pilots who rammed US bombers and usually died.
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 6 weeks 1 day ago
    Ode to Japan
    Page Mark Davis
    Jim, The purpose of this article was to inspire Americans to reflect on where we have gone wrong in abandoning the parts of our culture that helped make us a free, harmonious and prosperous people by using the Japanese culture as an example of a people who have better maintained those core principles (hard work, thrift, saving, manners, social consciousness, sacrificing for others, etc.) such that virtue, honor and dignity are valued. That does not mean that I think Japanese culture is perfect and without fault. I don't think humans are capable of perfection, but some do better than others - and I think it is helpful to consider why that is. 1. The Japanese were forced to open their borders and trade to foreigners by colonial powers who were at the time carving up "Spheres of Influence" in China in the mid to late 1800s. The Japanese elite responded to this humiliation by adopting Western-style state institutions including mercantilism and colonial possessions. This elite posturing led to an “If you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em.” argument that “suckered” many into believing that their survival depended on it. They learned more from losing WW II, along the lines you mention, than the US did winning it. They are more skeptical of politicians and state power today than they were 75-100 years ago. 2. Stories about cruelty to POWs written by the side the POWs came from are typically filled with atrocities. This is especially true of stories from the side of the victors when the losers near the end of a war are short on food, medicine, troops and patience. And, again, my observations are of today, not 75 years ago. Still, the Japanese seem to respect perseverance at all costs and do not respect those who give-up without a fight. 3. Suicide-missions are not uncommon among militaries the world over. Even the Germans had suicide pilots (including at least one woman) training to fly one-way V2 rocket planes to England near the end of the war, but ran out of rockets. Desperate times lead to desperate measures. I don’t think you could get many Japanese today to do such a thing. 4. I thought I was pretty clear in delineating between 1) voluntary hierarchies where leaders are followed based on their respect-worthy actions that inspire confidence in those that chose to cooperate and follow them and 2) coercive hierarchies where the threat of violence is the modus operandi for forcing obedience. Leaders are not only a natural social arrangement, but a necessary one if a group is to be successful in attaining common goals for mutual benefit. For example, the Captain of a football team doesn’t rule anybody, but his leadership skills are crucial to the success of the team. 5. I think that, today, Japanese culture relies more on social power than political power in comparison to the USA; certainly the trend favors the Japanese in that area. However, they still have a number of barriers to trade with non-Japanese actors, especially labor, as they are very protectionist which lowers their score in such rankings. I also think that a much higher proportion of Americans have come to rely more heavily on state mandates, hand-outs and guidance than on social networks. The Japanese still value family, neighbors, business networks and community more than state functionaries. If the state went bankrupt tomorrow the Japanese wouldn’t miss a beat while Americans would freak out and likely come apart. That is how states (especially democracies) typically fail and dissolve: bankruptcy. When humans evolve beyond the barbaric state apparatus used by elite to control the peasants, it will be a mixture of American ideals and Japanese social constructs that lead the way.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 6 weeks 2 days ago
    Ode to Japan
    Page Mark Davis
    I thought of a fifth question.   5. You make an excellent case for the view that Japanese culture is superior to ours, yet has it led to a society that more closely approximates a free one? Is government on the way to elimination? Does it participate less in the economy than ours does?   It seems not. Isn't it the case that major industries have, since 1945, been nationalized or made subject to central planning? The Heritage Foundation ranks the country tenth in its region for freedom as reckoned by several metrics, and fortieth in the world, being only "moderately free."
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 6 weeks 4 days ago
    Ode to Japan
    Page Mark Davis
    Thank you, Mark, for a very informative article. Impressive indeed that Japanese culture can peacefully absorb several religions without violence, for example. A few questions arise.   1. How was it that this peaceful society was suckered into letting its government run strident, aggressive military adventures in China and Mongolia in the 1920s and 30s, which in turn gave FDR some excuse to intervene and let the entire US Press Corps characterize Japanese as little yellow rats, and worse?   2. In WW-2, the Japanese military did consist of ordinary Japanese men, yet its treatment of PoWs was viciously cruel. How do you reconcile that fact with the cultural values you describe?   3. Famously, towards the end of that war many Japanese pilots committed murder-suicide in a last ditch attempt to postpone defeat, so bringing the word "kamikaze" into worldwide use. Such fanatical loyalty to the State seems hard to reconcile with your portrait of a gentle culture. What gives?   4. Why do you think "the set of conditions that lead to my ideal society must include a functional hierarchy"?  A "hierarchy" means a structure of command, and my ideal society will have none of that whatever. Either individuals rule themselves, or someone else does; to have both is not possible.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 6 weeks 4 days ago Page Paul Hein
    Queen Liz in her personal capacity may not own all that much; the holdings mainly relate to the office of monarch. Whoever sits on the throne is said to own it. None of them mixed their labor with it, of course, so the claim is bogus.   As far as I understand it, a series of such monarchs decided they would own North America, and chartered agents to go and grab it, in the name of the King. After the unfortunate event of 1781 took place, that claim was ceded to the American States, whose governments continued the pretense. That's why nobody here owns any land.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 6 weeks 5 days ago Page Paul Hein
    Hearty agreement with your opening statement. The purpose of virtually all newspapers is to obscure, rather than to present, news. To enhance the overall social engineering. I’ve not subscribed for many years. Nor have I owned or watched television, for that reason. Obfuscation emerges as the primary axiom in the science and practice of rulership. ”…the persons, as well as the property, of individuals are not under their control, but the control of the rulers, to whatever extent they desire.” Read this: http://www.strike-the-root.com/61/nonentity/nonentity2.html An old 2006 STR essay. (Wherefore art thou, NonEntity???) Nobody on this forum really questions the fact that the white man has introduced conflicting “laws”, such as would make it “illegal” to possess a flask of whiskey at one time, “legal” at another. Same for gold coin. Anyone who attempts to find a degree of logic or consistency in the white man’s practice of rulership (including his constitutions and his bills of “rights”) will be duly frustrated. (Those who know me will recognize that I will always use “white man” in lieu of “the-rulers”. They might be your rulers, but they are not my rulers. Many are black as the ace of spades sofar as skin color is concerned. Racism is not my intent). Am curious about your scenario: “suppose you are seated at one end of a table, and government is seated at the other..." Of course, “government” is an abstraction. “It” does not exist. Human beings exist. So, here I sit. Am I here (sitting at the table with "government") through the trickery called “voluntary compliance”? Or am I sitting with “Mr Gov” (yes, that brainless abstraction) because gentlemen with guns have escorted me here -- under penalty of violence or death were I to resist or refuse the encounter (subpoenaed)? Because if I volunteered to attend said meeting, knowing and fully understanding the nature of “Mr Gov”, I no doubt deserve to lose “…my wallet, the deed to my home, title to my car, and all other assets I own” sitting out on the table. Judgment proof status is a primary requisite for freedom in an unfree world. And if you plan to volunteer, better Jack the Ripper (or your local free-market thug) than “Mr Gov”. Sam
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 7 weeks 1 day ago Page Glen Allport
    This article is one of your best, Glen; and the subject deserves more exploration. I offer some in my Zero Government Blog, out today as Kindly Stop It.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 7 weeks 1 day ago Page Glen Allport
    The word is derived from the Latin imperāre; to impose, order, command.   An associated noun was imperator, meaning commander or, later, Caesar. It led to the English Emperor and empire. So the word is heavily infused with authority and compulsion. Something is important and crucial because it has been commanded from on high.
  • James Clayton's picture
    James Clayton 7 weeks 2 days ago Page Paul Hein
    Max Borders and Jeffrey Tucker compiled a list of 99 ways to leave Leviathan: https://fee.org/resources/99-ways-to-leave-leviathan/ Some individuals will take some action to avoid some of the meddlers and plunderers who gather together in that thing called government. Some people might assume that nobody can “be free” until we’re all free according to one definition of “freedom”; and they might prefer “the slow road of mass education” in an attempt to persuade millions of other people to change their lives. As Chris Campbell said in ‘The Mind-Blowing Truth of Living Free in an Unfree World’, “you can cut to the core of what freedom means to you and act on that.” But the word “freedom” might then become so subjective that it would convey very little information, so maybe one could say “I am me” instead of saying “I am free”. Thoughts and words are obviously important, but he did suggest that we have to act, which should come as no surprise to most people. As Dan Sanchez said in that article, “You do you” (which reminds me of Buckminster Fuller’s “I seem to be a verb”).
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 7 weeks 3 days ago Web link KenK
    "The first step to political rape prevention is the fundamental realization that you are getting screwed." Roger that, over.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 7 weeks 3 days ago Page Paul Hein
    It is my observation, Paul, that few indeed can digest your comment. Therefore, not only can they not become free in the here and the now (at least that's the way it appears to me -- but I'm not their judge); but also those same naysayers seem to be chagrined when you or I proclaim freedom in this unfree world. https://lfb.org/mind-blowing-truth-living-free-unfree-world/ Sam
  • James Clayton's picture
    James Clayton 8 weeks 2 days ago Page Paul Hein
    One woman, who is often referred to as Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, supposedly claims to own more land than any other woman or man on this planet. Her world is probably cluttered with a lot of stuff and things. But I'm sure she readily accepts the idea that she can own all that land and can reign over all the people who live on her land.
  • Darkcrusade's picture
    Darkcrusade 8 weeks 3 days ago Page Paul Hein
    That's Right. George the 3rd was defeated. Than he gets to set the terms of his surrender at the Treaty of Paris, spelling out debts and how much shall be payed to the Monarch himself. Cornwallis Yorktown surrender statements and Charles march off with all his arms is interesting way for a vanquished foe to 'surrender'. Plus the implementation of the (E)state system of governance brought to you by the King. The contrast is the comparison of Japan's surrender document to the terms of the Treaty of Paris. http://www.suijurisforum.com/wtf-t546-50.html#p12528 http://nikiforcongress.blogspot.com/2004/10/tontine-government-exon.html
  • James Clayton's picture
    James Clayton 8 weeks 3 days ago Page Paul Hein
    The sexes do tend to complement each other nicely, most of the time, which is a good thing for survival and reproduction. And the family may indeed be the only viable governing unit and legitimate "jurisdiction". Parents can certainly “speak the law” and attempt to enforce some rules, but – perhaps just to prove that action speaks louder than words – children can certainly find ways to test the rules (although most adults may have been trained to stop doing this). Families can generally be cohesive groups because individuals can often exhibit a favourable bias towards (genetic) relatives; and from a purely biological perspective we might only seem to be disposable vehicles for self-replicating molecules (those “selfish” genes!), but every human organism can also tend to be fairly self-interested (or “genetically self-interested”, since each person is his/her own closest relative). People probably make choices and take action on the basis of some measure of costs and benefits, and families can certainly provide examples of governing units that can be mutually beneficial, with some sharing of risks and expenses – even without the express consent of the governed.
  • Darkcrusade's picture
    Darkcrusade 8 weeks 4 days ago Page Paul Hein
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRsYwu8uD4I https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3mzYKWDx6YI
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 8 weeks 4 days ago Page Paul Hein
    Nice essay, Paul! And astute in observing also! I read once that women owned 79% of the earth's real property that can be entitled. But if they were so blamed brilliant they could own the other 21% too :-( I've said for years that there is one, and one only "jurisdiction": the family unit. All others are coercive interlopers, sustained by massive superstition and augmented with force of arms. Sam
  • Darkcrusade's picture
    Darkcrusade 9 weeks 5 days ago Page Kevin M. Patten
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YX3nLsWhYJo
  • Darkcrusade's picture
    Darkcrusade 9 weeks 5 days ago
    Ode to Japan
    Page Mark Davis
    Sounds like a great place to visit. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7iEgED_g65I https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P7Z2O9Nwt6c
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 9 weeks 6 days ago
    Ode to Japan
    Page Mark Davis
    Thank you for the kind words, Glen. The way the local Japanese people reacted to the Fukushima tsunami and nuclear power plant disaster was amazing; with calm resolve and peaceful cooperation throughout the community with no panic, looting or other social breakdowns. There are some great videos on Youtube showing this. I had that incident and a few other anecdotal examples in my original draft, but it was way too long such that I had to cut it down as much as I could and still, hopefully, get my main points across.
  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 9 weeks 6 days ago
    Ode to Japan
    Page Mark Davis
    Wow! Terrific discussion of the fascinating Japanese culture contrasted with the rotting Marxist Mush of our own. You make good points, naturally, and I especially enjoyed the details about Japan and Japanese society. Japan might be the most interesting modern nation on Earth; weird and wonderful in many ways. You didn't get into the topic of the US pushing nuclear power on Japan or Fukushima and other related problems, but I wonder to what extent we've destroyed the country we helped rebuild after WWII. At any rate, I hadn't given much thought to how Japanese culture, strangely, was helping to protect  early-American values in Japan. Thanks, Mark.
  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 9 weeks 6 days ago Page Paul Hein
    Great column, Paul -- and incidentally, congrats on entering your ninth decacde. Your BS detector certainly hasn't gotten rusty in your old age! "Thermometer" is a terrific "Emperor's New Clothes" piece on global warming, seasoned with passing references to other "do not question!" BS.
  • rita's picture
    rita 10 weeks 1 day ago Web link felix.ireton
    Most people who die from accidental drug overdose in this country die because the drugs they're using are illegal. This is not an accident. We, as a nation and as a society, have enough experience with drug prohibition to know that the one guaranteed effect that prohibition has on drug use is to make it more dangerous. Blame BiG Pharma and over-prescribing doctors for getting us all addicted; blame unscrupulous drug dealers for adulterated drugs; blame the sick/elderly/handicapped guy down the street who just, for Christ's sake, wants a little relief from pain. But these are not the people who are driving Americans to heroin, they're not the ones allowing tainted drugs to be sold on the streets, who leave our children to die, alone and abandoned, when their experimentation with drugs goes horribly wrong. (Or did you think the only addicts overdose?) No, credit for this so-called "crisis," rests solely at the feet of our own government. Anyone who says differently is either a liar or a fool.