Recent comments

  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 1 day 1 hour ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Probably should include this article I found here as well:   https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2018/02/20/using-the-best-data-possible-we-set-out-to-find-the-middle-of-nowhere/?utm_term=.017d5d6f9dc0    
  • D. Saul Weiner's picture
    D. Saul Weiner 3 days 10 hours ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    I don't think that we can assume that drug testing will necessarily be very expensive in a free market setting. We really have no idea if there are far superior models for evaluating drugs than the FDA-mandated one. We need a market in order to determine how the testing ought to work and what it will cost. I am not sure about how copyright should work.
  • John deLaubenfels's picture
    John deLaubenfels 3 days 10 hours ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Oops, I meant to reply to you but created a separate new message instead.
  • John deLaubenfels's picture
    John deLaubenfels 3 days 10 hours ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    I agree with many of your points.      . The cost of bringing new drugs to the market is, without question, heavily distorted by government rules, allegedly in place to ensure quality but, like many or most government rules, of questionable cost-effectiveness (at best) or counterproductive (at worse).      . The true cost of drugs is obscured by government influenced, if not mandated, practices of paying for them.      . Other more cost-effective theraputics might supplant many expensive drugs now being prescribed, if the market weren't so distorted.   On the other hand,      . Even if we stipulate that the vast majority of new drugs introduced are worthless or worse, I would assert that some fraction are life-saving, a real boon to mankind.      . Even if we streamline the qualification process, removing all rules other than truth-telling (not over-hyping how safe a drug is known to be, etc.) for marketing a drug, for example, the process of testing a new drug will be very expensive.  This can be mitigated to some extent by performing human trials on people who are dying and eager to try anything, aware of the risks, but it will still be very expensive.      . As time goes on, it will become increasingly easy to maufacture any particular compound, which will make it easier than ever to make a cheap profit off someone else's work.   "Should we wring our hands or simply accept the verdict of the market...?"   Is that how you feel about copyright too?  Should I be able to sell and profit from the spreadsheet program you wrote rather than writing my own?  I think unique new drugs should be protected in much the same way copyrighted works are today.
  • D. Saul Weiner's picture
    D. Saul Weiner 3 days 11 hours ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    "I don't want to defend the crony-capitalist practices of today's drug companies, but if we want a continued flow of new life-saving drugs, then the huge effort it takes to bring a drug to market must be rewarded by some form of protection." There are many assumptions built into this statement which may not be warranted. First, do we want these drugs? Well, we really can't answer that question in the absence of a real market, where consumers willingly pay the full price for these drugs out of their own pockets. Second, do we actually already have a "flow of new life-saving drugs"? The evidence is that few new drugs are life-saving, most only suppress symptoms, and many have been shown to be harmful and lethal. Third, even if we were to concede the 1st 2 points, is it really true that "the huge effort it takes to bring a drug to market must be rewarded by some form of protection."? Maybe the huge effort and expense is actually just a form of protectionism, to keep less lucrative therapeutics off the market, since they cannot afford to run the FDA gauntlet. Maybe if we had a system of competing private firms certifying drugs and other therapeutics, it could be done much more quickly and efficiently, and would not require monopoly prices to underwrite such an effort. But, let us suppose, that even in an environment where competing private firms were operating that it might sometimes, if not often, be cost prohibitive to produce new drugs which are profitable absent patent protection. What should we make of this? Should we wring our hands or simply accept the verdict of the market, that such drugs have failed the market test and that our resources toward improving health or fighting disease should be allocated elsewhere?
  • John deLaubenfels's picture
    John deLaubenfels 3 days 12 hours ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    My views mirror yours, Alex.  My favorite example is a spreadsheet program: if I write and sell one, nothing prevents you from writing and selling a program with all the features mine has, but reasonable copyright prevents you from making money selling the program I wrote.   Where should the line be drawn between something that is protectable and something that is not?  In my view, the criterion should be that a work is complex enough that it is ridiculously unlikely (say, odds of one in the number of atoms in the universe) that it might be duplicated by chance by someone else.  Thus a book would be protected but a book title would not (same as now).      I also agree that patents are illegitimate, both in terms of the simplicity of ideas they protect and in the method by which they protect them, which discourages rather than being neutral or encouraging competition.  In contrast, by protecting individual works, copyright encourages competition.  But if we sweep away patents, some of what they now cover needs to be carried elsewhere.  I don't want to defend the crony-capitalist practices of today's drug companies, but if we want a continued flow of new life-saving drugs, then the huge effort it takes to bring a drug to market must be rewarded by some form of protection.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 5 days 7 hours ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    As always, I appreciate your input and analysis, Sam.  :-)  Thank you.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 5 days 9 hours ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Good topic for discussion, Alex. And well thought-out. "...With the recognition then that, if such practices still existed in freedom they would do so purely as a product of markets and free enterprise, we must then ask the obvious question as to whether individuals would be entitled to such protections at all..." Key words here (as I see them) are "entitled" and "protections". If you invite me for a visit into your home, are you "entitled" to be "protected" from my crapping on your floor or being rude or unkind to you and/or members of your family??? Of course, if you didn't know me well enough to discern that I'm not one who would so engage, you would probably not extend the invitation in the first place. Caution is prudence. You summed it up well in your final paragraph. Since none of us have experienced "true freedom" (with the possible exception of yours truly :-]) it's up in the air as to exactly how many of these "rights" will be protected once uncivil government is finally exterminated. Because there will still be, for example, "unfit" parents (is the newborn "entitled" to be fed, clothed and kept clean???). With the advent of the internet and compooterization, where it has become so easy to copy & paste, I try to be vigilant with myself and give credit for quotations and things that make sense to me -- to provide "links" where appropriate. But, as in your example of the wheel, I suppose nothing I say or write is totally, 100% original with me. Someone at one time in my life taught me to say, "Ma-Ma". I did not originate the term, but I use it (my dear Ma-Ma died in 1996). So discernment will probably rule in many cases, and there will always be some who will steal ideas and concepts without intending to remunerate whoever took the time and effort to produce them. And you might have to hunt 'em up and gun 'em down. Sam.
  • D. Saul Weiner's picture
    D. Saul Weiner 1 week 7 hours ago Page Paul Bonneau
    Well done. I greatly regret not homeschooling my daughters.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 1 week 10 hours ago Page Paul Bonneau
    Outstanding, Paul.  A great success story well told.  :-)
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 1 week 10 hours ago
    The Purchase
    Page Paul Hein
    Very nicely done, Paul.  Kudos.  :-)
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 1 week 1 day ago
    Cop Love
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    Sam, I think you and others like Paul are very much keeping the raz-a-ma-taz alive, and it's good to see.  :-)
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 1 week 1 day ago
    Cop Love
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    Paul, I had forgotten about this one.  It's a great one.  Concise and accurate.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 1 week 1 day ago
    Cop Love
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    An excellent response, Sam.  Thank you.  :-)
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 1 week 1 day ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Hi misochu:   Skyler J. Collins is in Salt Lake City, he of http://everything-voluntary.com, and numerous Mises Institute-backed publications.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 1 week 1 day ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Hi Paul:   I think I remember you mentioning Wyoming a while back, and its pros and cons as a Liberty Location.  I was aware it is the least populated "state" (tax farm), and so, strictly from a standpoint of sheer sociological pragmatism alone it has its advantages.  Vermont is second place in that category (albeit in a much smaller geographical area), and Alaska is third.
  • mishochu's picture
    mishochu 1 week 1 day ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Cool, somewhere in Utah has got to make the list, obviously not SLC, but somewhere. Granted, they do love that drug/alcohol war.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 1 week 1 day ago
    Cop Love
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    Thanks for the reminder, Paul, of one of your better contributions. Too bad STR has had to become fallow and not conducive to the good raz-a-ma-taz discussions we had back then. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 1 week 1 day ago
    Cop Love
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    "...tyrant thieves who have the tacit support of society..." And therein lies the heart of the matter. As long as this condition exists you and I will indeed have to scrap and fight (much of the combat taking place betwixt each of our very ears) in order to be and remain free. There is a huge and daunting demand for authoritarianism out there in the marketplace. And if there is anything those of us at STR understand it is the law of supply and demand. As long as individuals "register" and "vote" the apparent demand will remain strong. I long for the day they hold an election and nobody shows up. That's why it is important for you to continue to comment and write wherever you see the opportunity. And everyone else here and at the precious few other anarchist forums on the net. I'm not certain what it's going to take to make significant erosions in that demand. I'd like to see it in my lifetime. Yet, the growth of internet freedom and genuine free thinking engendered therein shows the way. It could be happening before my eyes, but I'm too prejudiced toward my own dogma to recognize it. As you've seen me write, I was probably more stimulated to investigate freedom once I became free of alcohol within AA (still perhaps the most libertarian organization in town), lo those many years ago. Sam
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 1 week 1 day ago
    Cop Love
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    http://strike-the-root.com/why-people-believe-government-is-here-to-help-us
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 1 week 1 day ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Thanks for this list, Alex. You *might* want to add Wyoming to this list. (I was one of the principals of "Free State Wyoming". Wyoming got 2nd place in the Free State Project state selection process.) I lived there for a few years. I used to open carry a handgun routinely, cops were nice (relatively speaking - they even waved as they drove by), and the small-town atmosphere meant that the ruling class was not too far removed from the peons, which tends to reduce their depredations. Probably the most heavily-armed state in the country, which keeps the crime low as a side benefit. Thousand-yard rifle ranges are everywhere there's BLM land. Almost no building code (just well and septic inspections) for homes outside city limits, and tax-free shopping in neighboring Montana. No income tax. Downside was heavy-handed drug prohibition, onerous hunting regulation, a growing free shit army and plenty of fascist-style business/govt corruption. Best towns are probably those in the NE corner of the state, where a lot of Free State Wyoming folks ended up (e.g. Newcastle, Sundance, Hulett), Thermopolis, Casper and maybe Cody. Avoid Cheyenne, Laramie, Sheridan and Evanston. There is a little town, Freedom, Wyoming, where Freedom Arms revolvers are manufactured.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 1 week 3 days ago
    Cop Love
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    Not much argument here, except to say that there is in fact a vast difference between tyrant thieves who have the tacit support of society if I attempt to repel them or defend myself against them, and the garden-variety kind whom I could (and even can, in some cases, now) defend myself against at will with societal approval if not even assistance.   Such is another of the differences, I'd be willing to wager, between a status-quo statist society and a free one.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 1 week 3 days ago
    Cop Love
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    "...it is impossible to be free when one has to constantly sidestep aggression or potential aggression at every twist and turn in life's pathways, starting with taxes..." So, does a truly free anarchist expect there will be no "free market robbers" once civil state meets its demise and organized state becomes history for each and all? I can't speak for "...every twist and turn in life's pathways...", but I suspect there will be ample supply of shysters and fraudsters and down-right burglars and robbers in a true state of anarchy. Of course if we all have to protect our own interests in order to circumvent those who will rob us, we will devise plans to do so. Free-market plans. (What was the old show, "Have Gun, Will Travel"???) As of now, you will be prosecuted even if you do attempt to protect yourself -- especially if you "...take-the-law-into-your-own-hands..." Neither you nor I know exactly how the world around us will shape up in total freedom. That's because none of us have ever been totally free. I like to think I've come about as close as most -- simply due to the recognition that "...if it's gonna be, it's up to me, not thee..." I've gotta be free if I expect to do much in the way of participation in your becoming free. I can write all the essays and programs and lesson plans to "teach" others how to become free and the evil aspects of statism. But if I'm still moaning and whining away about the white man, his "police", et al., my broadcasts will no doubt be of limited effect. Freedom begins betwixt my ears -- not yours (although I know you personally are processing liberty each time you wake up -- and I truly wish you and all Root-Strikers to be free). Once a critical mass become free betwixt their ears, there will be no market for the white man. I'm happy to see this marching forward and, like you, hope to see the end of state before I die. I'm 83. You'd better get skattin'!!! My total freedom depends upon you -- contrary to my seeming preachin' otherwise. I could go on endlessly about this. But for now I'll repeat: I can be free. Here. Today. Where I'm "at". So can you. Sam
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 1 week 4 days ago
    Cop Love
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    Hi there again Sam:   I understand entirely where you're coming from, but of course, unlike those good folks who bid open defiance to the Crown, where I'm coming from is that I don't want to see the beast tamed -- I want to see it die:  As both institution and idea.   That being so, it is impossible to be free when one has to constantly sidestep aggression or potential aggression at every twist and turn in life's pathways, starting with taxes.  I tried my best, along with Irwin Schiff, to stop funding the beast and ultimately the beast arm-wrestled me back into compliance.  Schiff himself fared even worse, I'm afraid.   So unless you have some means of being the first colonizer of Mars, I'm afraid freedom can only truly and fully come about once there are no longer government enforcers watching us and waiting to pounce at the first true signs of our unwillingness to continue to be physically controlled.  Our minds can be free, yes.  But our physical bodies and property -- not so much.  Not until the death-knell of government itself.   I have little hope I'll live to see that day, but it is, I think, the correct goal nonetheless and I'll continue to do what I can in my own small way to push things in that direction as much as possible without sacrificing too much of what pleasures there still are in life even under the increasingly burdensome yoke of the State.  I'm thinking perhaps your own philosophy is not too far from that, as well.  :-)
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 1 week 5 days ago
    Cop Love
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    Hello Alex! Since I no longer have internet at home (interfered with my biking and stayin' young :-|) I didn't watch the video. Have to bring earphones to hear videos, and never remember my ear buds. I've seen many confrontations with police and border psychopaths, some quite good. But it's fair to keep in mind those who "bravely-stand-their-ground-and-assert-their-freedoms" are the ones who plaintively wish the beast would just tame down. If "we" stand up for our "rights", we might see him become less oppressive. He ain't a-gonna. To this extent I fully agree with Mr. Davies. Organized state must end. And neither you nor I nor Jim are a-gonna end it. Except to exorcize the vestiges that linger betwixt our ears. On the other hand, I've ended it for the most part. I'm a free, sovereign state. In so being I must daily recognize the hazardous trip wires all over the place. They have to be sidestepped and circumnavigated in order for me to remain free. I find myself reviewing our old and late friend, Harry Brown's "...Freedom in an Unfree World" (I think a free text version can be clicked on this link). I can be free. Here. Today. Where I'm "at". So can you. Sam
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 2 weeks 4 days ago
    Cop Love
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    Sam, how are you?  :-)  I don't disagree with your basic premise -- avoid confrontation.  Absolutely right.  But here there was no avoiding them, they pulled her over.  So the options at that point become very limited:  Surerender freedom meekly, in the hopes that the cops' abuses won't be too harsh, or stand your ground and assert your freedoms.  We can debate the pragmatism or lack thereof in the course this woman chose, but regardless, I salute her courage and integrity.  And again, if this attitude were far more pervasive, we might get to see some positive change.  And change is quite sorely needed in an atmosphere where one inherently takes one's own life into one's own hands simply by asking a few questions of a couple of 90 IQ apes in blue suits.   We have a long way to go.  But things are also underway as well, aren't they?  
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 2 weeks 4 days ago
    Cop Love
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    Mark, here's another textbook example of how 99% of the population react when you attempt to explain Voluntaryism to them.  Nothing but denial and cognitive dissonance:   http://everything-voluntary.com/dreamers-parents-never-sinned    
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 2 weeks 5 days ago
    Cop Love
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    "...Cop Love, I repeat, is a psychological disorder..." "...Imagine the effect it would have, however, if everyone -- or even just *most* people -- spoke up to them this way and refused cooperation..." My mode is to sidestep and avoid confrontation wherever possible. You're not a-gonna change 'em. But each confrontation I allow myself causes grief to me. Even here on the forums. Because I've come to understand that few of us [present company excluded :-)] are willing to back up and assess our own conclusions prior to getting into pissin' matches -- particularly over what I call "libertarian dogma".. My philosophies might be weak. If so, I really need to make that assessment. One thing I do often is, when checking out to pay at Wal Mart or the grocery, ask: "...do you take federal reserve notes here???" Which, often, meets me with a blank look and insolent response. At that point I'll often hold up a "dollar" or a five and say, "this is backed by the most dangerous superstition in town -- nothing else!..." They generally don't want to touch that with the proverbial 10' pole, but it resets the psychological disorder some. Sam
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 2 weeks 6 days ago
    Cop Love
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    Imagine the effect it would have, however, if everyone -- or even just *most* people -- spoke up to them this way and refused cooperation.  They can't shoot us all.  They can *try* -- but that's when people start shooting back.
  • PaulTheCabDriver's picture
    PaulTheCabDriver 2 weeks 6 days ago
    Cop Love
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    While I agree with you guys that the woman in the video was right, one should also point out that, as libertarian attorney Marc Victor is fond of saying, "The roadside is not the place to argue constitutional law." This is prudence. Surrounded by so many "paladins in blue" who are armed to the teeth, she is literally taking her life in her hands by not being cooperative. She is lucky she didn't get shot.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 3 weeks 3 hours ago
    Cop Love
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    Excellent quote.  But only because it is so sadly true.
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 3 weeks 5 hours ago
    Cop Love
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    You will obey! Resistance is futile! So sad that so many people have been conditioned to accept their submission to arbitrary authority and justify it with "The police were very polite while they were demanding obedience and threatening violence." 
  • D. Saul Weiner's picture
    D. Saul Weiner 3 weeks 10 hours ago
    Cop Love
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    This is right. People cannot handle the cognitive dissonance that arises when they acknowledge the truth about the power structure. The problem is mainly one of self-deception. We see this all the time with the refusal of so many people to see the reality of the government vaccine program. The truth is all around them, but they insist on ignoring or rejecting it.
  • emartin's picture
    emartin 3 weeks 16 hours ago
    Cop Love
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    "Most people prefer to believe that their leaders are just and fair, even in the face of evidence to the contrary, because once a citizen acknowledges that the government under which he lives is lying and corrupt, the citizen has to choose what he or she will do about it. To take action in the face of corrupt government entails risks of harm to life and loved ones. To choose to do nothing is to surrender one's self-image of standing for principles. Most people do not have the courage to face that choice. Hence, most propaganda is not designed to fool the critical thinker but only to give moral cowards an excuse not to think at all." ~ Michael Rivero
  • Douglas Herman's picture
    Douglas Herman 4 weeks 6 hours ago Page Douglas Herman
    JD in Georgia, Excellent insight JD. 
  • Douglas Herman's picture
    Douglas Herman 4 weeks 6 hours ago Page Douglas Herman
    Thanks Mark,     Loved your picks. Oddly, the songs I played OVER & OVER again back in the day, weren't really the most this or that, only the most fitting (somehow) for the moment. If that makes any sense. Rock On-!  
  • jd-in-georgia's picture
    jd-in-georgia 4 weeks 4 days ago Page Douglas Herman
    This is a very good article. One could debate this topic peacefully all day long. One could add at least a dozen more songs to this list. It would be a challenge to add any song that might be pertinent composed after 1998. The point is that music is still a definitive part of our culture. I think it was Joe Perry who said in an interview, "today's music is plugged into some business model algorithm." I cannot be sure of the exact quote but the sentiment is right on. The quest for gold supercedes genuine creativity. Pop music has become way too homogenized. Even in the early days of pop music in the late 50s and early 60s, the music sounded similar but one could at least distinguish one band from another. Of course, state educational systems putting arts and music on the outer margins of the budget are not helping nurture budding musicians either. LONG LIVE ROCK
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 4 weeks 5 days ago
    The Divine Right
    Page Paul Hein
    Larken Rose phrases it thus: "...All mainstream political discussion - all debate about what should be “legal” and “illegal,” who should be put into power, what “national policy” should be, how “government” should handle various issues - all of it is utterly irrational and a complete waste of time, as it is all based upon the false premise that one person can have the right to rule another, that “authority” can even exist. The entire debate about how “authority” should be used, and what “government” should do, is exactly as useful as debating how Santa Claus should handle Christmas. "But it is infinitely more dangerous. "On the bright side, removing that danger – the biggest threat that humanity has ever faced in fact – does not require changing the fundamental nature of man, or converting all hatred to love, or performing any other drastic alteration to the state of the universe. Instead, it requires only that people recognize and then let go of one particular superstition, one irrational lie that almost everyone has been taught to believe. In one sense, most of the world’s problems could be solved overnight if everyone did something akin to giving up the belief in Santa Claus… "…All political discussion rests upon an unquestioned but false assumption, which everyone takes on faith simply because they see and hear everyone else repeating the myth: the notion that there can be such a thing as legitimate 'government'...” ~Larken Rose, “The Most Dangerous Superstition”
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 5 weeks 16 min ago Page Douglas Herman
    Great article, Doug; very enjoyable. There is so much great music from that era. I remember listening to songs on the radio, but played albums at home on the turntable. Too many great ones to pick a true favorite, but Dark Side of the Moon by Pink Floyd, Exodus by Bob Marley and Aqualung by Jethro Tull probably got the most plays on both sides because every song was great on all three.
  • Douglas Herman's picture
    Douglas Herman 5 weeks 5 hours ago Page Douglas Herman
    Thanks for your wonderful words, Alex. Yeah, we were young and dumb and full of cum, and on the run. Or something like that. I had two of the first QMS albums back then and loved their instrumental guitar pieces best. Most of us who lived thru the 60s missed 'em too, Alex. Good Vibrations? NOW that was a cool song, great inits own way. Enjoy yer posts on FB BTW.  Doug
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 5 weeks 23 hours ago Page Douglas Herman
    What a cool column, Doug!  :-)  I knew you were Air Force around that time in Texas, and that you saw Hendrix down there.  :-)  I had NO idea your roomies hailed from ZZ Top, the Brooklyn Bridge, and the Ohio Express!  That's almost uncanny coincidence.   My dad was Air Force at that time too (1962-1975) -- would've been stationed here in the northeast by then, though.  And I guarantee he never saw Hendrix.  :-)    I agree the Buffalo Springfield's "For What It's Worth" is one of the enduring tunes of relevancy.  I'll also nominate Quicksilver Messenger Service with "What About Me?" ("Most of what I do believe is against most of your laws!")   I missed the 60s for the most part -- I only remember the 70s, as things were kind of winding down, but even then it was a fun time.  I do doubt we'll ever see anything like that confluence of people, things, talent, and good vibrations again.  
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 6 weeks 3 days ago
    Thinkers vs. Feelers
    Page Mark Davis
    You are definitely one of the thinkers, Sam. As you know, it can be demonstrated that freedom works for those that are able to accept responsibility for their actions, but there's the rub for feelers who like to make endless excuses for their choosing to avoid that responsibility.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 6 weeks 5 days ago
    Thinkers vs. Feelers
    Page Mark Davis
    Oh -- one more thing. I also fervently hope that those of us "libertarians" will come to think rather than feel regarding slight disagreements pertaining to definitions, etc. I can see no reason, ever, for any of us to rag on others of us when the price of freedom is currently so high. There is no reason for STR participants to feel "chased away" by opinions or other dogma -- before their miracle happens. I still remember and often quote your "Be Free" article of many years back: "I suggest that if an individual really wants to be free then they should begin to act free themselves; that is, choose to be free..." Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 6 weeks 5 days ago
    Thinkers vs. Feelers
    Page Mark Davis
    As with most of your articles, Mark, this one caused me to think. Really. No pun intended. For years I remember the drivel, "Trust Your Gut". And, there are times one might have no more to go on than gut feelings about an issue or matter. But even in that instance the thinker tends to use previous evidence and confirmed information and knowledge on which to make her decision. "The odds", etc etc. But you did well in drawing that on out. As I see it, most "political" discussions are 95% "feelings". Same with "libertarian theory". I really do not know how the world will appear once all those psychopaths who make up "government" decide to resign and seek honest work. I do know we've all been totally saturated with the "matrix" that is collectivism. It is almost impossible to genuinely think through exactly how certain issues will resolve themselves once world-wide freedom and liberty are realities. In a sense, you might say that I have faith that freedom is going to work. Well. Better than I could have imagined. I fervently hope to live to see that day. Sam
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 6 weeks 6 days ago
    Thinkers vs. Feelers
    Page Mark Davis
    You nailed it, Saul. I think there may be more feelers today posing as thinkers than actual thinkers.
  • D. Saul Weiner's picture
    D. Saul Weiner 6 weeks 6 days ago
    Thinkers vs. Feelers
    Page Mark Davis
    Today's SJW's are an extreme case of feelings trumping reason, but most people have fallen into this pattern. The norm for some time has been rationalization taking the place of reason. Politicians and citizens relying upon economists who provide reasons for all sorts of detrimental interventions. Citizens who rely upon authority figures who tell them that everyone must be vaccinated; they think that they are relying upon reason (such as doing their part to maintain herd immunity or abiding by a risk/benefit analysis) while they are really just giving into fearmongering. That is really the bottom line. Are you making your decision or recommendation based on reason or are you merely justifying it based on something which has the semblance of reason? 
  • Douglas Herman's picture
    Douglas Herman 9 weeks 2 days ago Page Douglas Herman
    Paul-   Only 8 ? C'mon! You can click onto YouTube and find some videos how to disassemble a plugged kitchen drain. You can take a photo of an item, and with an Ebay ap, put that item on Ebay. I know a couple guys who do that with books at the local thrift store.    Smartphones are only as wise as the ones using them. BUT, I rarely see a snowflake reading a book anymore.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 9 weeks 3 days ago Page Paul Bonneau
    With you, Jim, it really doesn't matter what you asked me. I'll be embroiled in some foolish word game no matter. With you. A forum generally attracts those who are "with" the general forum content. If ultra-liberals, ultra-neocons, et al., wish to post here I'll "approve" their "right" to so post. Doesn't mean I'll "approve" the content of their post. In the days of the "heavy hitters" at STR I needed have no fear that the ultra's would gain much footage here at STR. Sometimes I merely ignore combativeness and foolishness (foolishness to ME: I'm sure each of them sincerely believe what they post, and do not translate the post into "combative" or "disagreeable"). Early in my libertarian acceptance I did sign into a few controversial forums. But when I discovered I was in "over-my-head" -- that I had virtually NO "fellow travelers" (folks with libertarian leaning) -- the fun began to wear off. I'm not combative by nature. And I'm definitely no dogmatist. That -- long before I identified as anarchist -- probably interfered most with my ability to feel like an effective educator in government ("public" ha ha) schools. Anarchists tend to avoid dogma. Sam
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 9 weeks 6 days ago
    Funny Business
    Page Paul Hein
    Yet another fine piece, Paul. I don't know if you're familiar with TheAnarchistAlternative.info, but what you wrote here is very compatible with it.  I take part in the PBS News Hour forum online, whose whole unstated assumption is that the State rightfully exists; I have a lot of fun puncturing that absurd premise and often refer participants to it if they show signs of peeping over the edge of the statist box.   I'll watch for an opportunity to refer them to your "Funny Business." It introduces the absurdity of compulsion very well.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 9 weeks 6 days ago Page Paul Bonneau
    I didn't ask you that, Sam, I asked whether or not you'd approve, or think it appropriate, if some open statist were to be allowed to publish articles on STR. The site is (supposedly) not just for you or me or the choir; it is an outreach instrument to promote freedom from government.   So if Hillary Clinton were to become a contributor of articles here, for example, your only comment would be "I have nothing to fear"?   Of course you don't. But that is irrelevant and, I regret to say, pathetic. I have to wonder if you have any idea what STR is for.