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  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 6 days 9 hours ago
    Ode to Japan
    Page Mark Davis
    Hannah Reitsch, yes, one tough lady. Too bad she didn't fulfill her first ambition, to be a missionary doctor.   Adapting the V1 to make it pilotable could have been done. It was driven by a pulse-jet, so was not strictly a rocket, and flew at around 400 mph. When the fuel ran out, it crashed and exploded. Folk on the ground could hear it coming (the pulse frequency was comparable to a loud motor bike) and if the noise stopped when the device seemed to be overhead, it was important to duck. Once spotted, Spitfires had no trouble shooting them down.   There's a great, classic movie called Green for Danger, in which V1s play a part.   The V2 was an early missile, rocket-fueled, whose path took it above the atmosphere. There was no warning of its approach and the explosives aboard were much more powerful. One fell within a mile of where I once lived.   Both were effective terror weapons, designed to scare the population; had they been deployed a year earlier and in greater numbers the war might have ended differently. Neither could be aimed accurately, a weakness Hannah's idea would have corrected for the V1.  
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 1 week 9 hours ago
    Ode to Japan
    Page Mark Davis
    Thanks for the link on the fighter pilots ramming planes, I learned something new. But here is what I was referring to: http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/test-pilot-reitsch-pitches-su... I couldn't find the original article I read about it, I know that the V2 was a rocket, but it mentioned these test pilots and early jet planes that were essentially rockets with wings. They were going to adapt left over V1s that had even worse guidance than the V2s which couldn't hit targets WAD.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 1 week 2 days ago
    Ode to Japan
    Page Mark Davis
    Thanks Mark. Minor correction: the V2 was a rocket, not a plane; see here. There was neither room for nor need of a pilot. Possibly you were thinking of Sonderkommando Elbe, a group of fighter pilots who rammed US bombers and usually died.
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 1 week 2 days ago
    Ode to Japan
    Page Mark Davis
    Jim, The purpose of this article was to inspire Americans to reflect on where we have gone wrong in abandoning the parts of our culture that helped make us a free, harmonious and prosperous people by using the Japanese culture as an example of a people who have better maintained those core principles (hard work, thrift, saving, manners, social consciousness, sacrificing for others, etc.) such that virtue, honor and dignity are valued. That does not mean that I think Japanese culture is perfect and without fault. I don't think humans are capable of perfection, but some do better than others - and I think it is helpful to consider why that is. 1. The Japanese were forced to open their borders and trade to foreigners by colonial powers who were at the time carving up "Spheres of Influence" in China in the mid to late 1800s. The Japanese elite responded to this humiliation by adopting Western-style state institutions including mercantilism and colonial possessions. This elite posturing led to an “If you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em.” argument that “suckered” many into believing that their survival depended on it. They learned more from losing WW II, along the lines you mention, than the US did winning it. They are more skeptical of politicians and state power today than they were 75-100 years ago. 2. Stories about cruelty to POWs written by the side the POWs came from are typically filled with atrocities. This is especially true of stories from the side of the victors when the losers near the end of a war are short on food, medicine, troops and patience. And, again, my observations are of today, not 75 years ago. Still, the Japanese seem to respect perseverance at all costs and do not respect those who give-up without a fight. 3. Suicide-missions are not uncommon among militaries the world over. Even the Germans had suicide pilots (including at least one woman) training to fly one-way V2 rocket planes to England near the end of the war, but ran out of rockets. Desperate times lead to desperate measures. I don’t think you could get many Japanese today to do such a thing. 4. I thought I was pretty clear in delineating between 1) voluntary hierarchies where leaders are followed based on their respect-worthy actions that inspire confidence in those that chose to cooperate and follow them and 2) coercive hierarchies where the threat of violence is the modus operandi for forcing obedience. Leaders are not only a natural social arrangement, but a necessary one if a group is to be successful in attaining common goals for mutual benefit. For example, the Captain of a football team doesn’t rule anybody, but his leadership skills are crucial to the success of the team. 5. I think that, today, Japanese culture relies more on social power than political power in comparison to the USA; certainly the trend favors the Japanese in that area. However, they still have a number of barriers to trade with non-Japanese actors, especially labor, as they are very protectionist which lowers their score in such rankings. I also think that a much higher proportion of Americans have come to rely more heavily on state mandates, hand-outs and guidance than on social networks. The Japanese still value family, neighbors, business networks and community more than state functionaries. If the state went bankrupt tomorrow the Japanese wouldn’t miss a beat while Americans would freak out and likely come apart. That is how states (especially democracies) typically fail and dissolve: bankruptcy. When humans evolve beyond the barbaric state apparatus used by elite to control the peasants, it will be a mixture of American ideals and Japanese social constructs that lead the way.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 1 week 3 days ago
    Ode to Japan
    Page Mark Davis
    I thought of a fifth question.   5. You make an excellent case for the view that Japanese culture is superior to ours, yet has it led to a society that more closely approximates a free one? Is government on the way to elimination? Does it participate less in the economy than ours does?   It seems not. Isn't it the case that major industries have, since 1945, been nationalized or made subject to central planning? The Heritage Foundation ranks the country tenth in its region for freedom as reckoned by several metrics, and fortieth in the world, being only "moderately free."
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 1 week 5 days ago
    Ode to Japan
    Page Mark Davis
    Thank you, Mark, for a very informative article. Impressive indeed that Japanese culture can peacefully absorb several religions without violence, for example. A few questions arise.   1. How was it that this peaceful society was suckered into letting its government run strident, aggressive military adventures in China and Mongolia in the 1920s and 30s, which in turn gave FDR some excuse to intervene and let the entire US Press Corps characterize Japanese as little yellow rats, and worse?   2. In WW-2, the Japanese military did consist of ordinary Japanese men, yet its treatment of PoWs was viciously cruel. How do you reconcile that fact with the cultural values you describe?   3. Famously, towards the end of that war many Japanese pilots committed murder-suicide in a last ditch attempt to postpone defeat, so bringing the word "kamikaze" into worldwide use. Such fanatical loyalty to the State seems hard to reconcile with your portrait of a gentle culture. What gives?   4. Why do you think "the set of conditions that lead to my ideal society must include a functional hierarchy"?  A "hierarchy" means a structure of command, and my ideal society will have none of that whatever. Either individuals rule themselves, or someone else does; to have both is not possible.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 1 week 5 days ago Page Paul Hein
    Queen Liz in her personal capacity may not own all that much; the holdings mainly relate to the office of monarch. Whoever sits on the throne is said to own it. None of them mixed their labor with it, of course, so the claim is bogus.   As far as I understand it, a series of such monarchs decided they would own North America, and chartered agents to go and grab it, in the name of the King. After the unfortunate event of 1781 took place, that claim was ceded to the American States, whose governments continued the pretense. That's why nobody here owns any land.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 1 week 6 days ago Page Paul Hein
    Hearty agreement with your opening statement. The purpose of virtually all newspapers is to obscure, rather than to present, news. To enhance the overall social engineering. I’ve not subscribed for many years. Nor have I owned or watched television, for that reason. Obfuscation emerges as the primary axiom in the science and practice of rulership. ”…the persons, as well as the property, of individuals are not under their control, but the control of the rulers, to whatever extent they desire.” Read this: http://www.strike-the-root.com/61/nonentity/nonentity2.html An old 2006 STR essay. (Wherefore art thou, NonEntity???) Nobody on this forum really questions the fact that the white man has introduced conflicting “laws”, such as would make it “illegal” to possess a flask of whiskey at one time, “legal” at another. Same for gold coin. Anyone who attempts to find a degree of logic or consistency in the white man’s practice of rulership (including his constitutions and his bills of “rights”) will be duly frustrated. (Those who know me will recognize that I will always use “white man” in lieu of “the-rulers”. They might be your rulers, but they are not my rulers. Many are black as the ace of spades sofar as skin color is concerned. Racism is not my intent). Am curious about your scenario: “suppose you are seated at one end of a table, and government is seated at the other..." Of course, “government” is an abstraction. “It” does not exist. Human beings exist. So, here I sit. Am I here (sitting at the table with "government") through the trickery called “voluntary compliance”? Or am I sitting with “Mr Gov” (yes, that brainless abstraction) because gentlemen with guns have escorted me here -- under penalty of violence or death were I to resist or refuse the encounter (subpoenaed)? Because if I volunteered to attend said meeting, knowing and fully understanding the nature of “Mr Gov”, I no doubt deserve to lose “…my wallet, the deed to my home, title to my car, and all other assets I own” sitting out on the table. Judgment proof status is a primary requisite for freedom in an unfree world. And if you plan to volunteer, better Jack the Ripper (or your local free-market thug) than “Mr Gov”. Sam
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 2 weeks 2 days ago Page Glen Allport
    This article is one of your best, Glen; and the subject deserves more exploration. I offer some in my Zero Government Blog, out today as Kindly Stop It.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 2 weeks 2 days ago Page Glen Allport
    The word is derived from the Latin imperāre; to impose, order, command.   An associated noun was imperator, meaning commander or, later, Caesar. It led to the English Emperor and empire. So the word is heavily infused with authority and compulsion. Something is important and crucial because it has been commanded from on high.
  • James Clayton's picture
    James Clayton 2 weeks 3 days ago Page Paul Hein
    Max Borders and Jeffrey Tucker compiled a list of 99 ways to leave Leviathan: https://fee.org/resources/99-ways-to-leave-leviathan/ Some individuals will take some action to avoid some of the meddlers and plunderers who gather together in that thing called government. Some people might assume that nobody can “be free” until we’re all free according to one definition of “freedom”; and they might prefer “the slow road of mass education” in an attempt to persuade millions of other people to change their lives. As Chris Campbell said in ‘The Mind-Blowing Truth of Living Free in an Unfree World’, “you can cut to the core of what freedom means to you and act on that.” But the word “freedom” might then become so subjective that it would convey very little information, so maybe one could say “I am me” instead of saying “I am free”. Thoughts and words are obviously important, but he did suggest that we have to act, which should come as no surprise to most people. As Dan Sanchez said in that article, “You do you” (which reminds me of Buckminster Fuller’s “I seem to be a verb”).
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 2 weeks 4 days ago Web link KenK
    "The first step to political rape prevention is the fundamental realization that you are getting screwed." Roger that, over.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 2 weeks 4 days ago Page Paul Hein
    It is my observation, Paul, that few indeed can digest your comment. Therefore, not only can they not become free in the here and the now (at least that's the way it appears to me -- but I'm not their judge); but also those same naysayers seem to be chagrined when you or I proclaim freedom in this unfree world. https://lfb.org/mind-blowing-truth-living-free-unfree-world/ Sam
  • James Clayton's picture
    James Clayton 3 weeks 3 days ago Page Paul Hein
    One woman, who is often referred to as Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, supposedly claims to own more land than any other woman or man on this planet. Her world is probably cluttered with a lot of stuff and things. But I'm sure she readily accepts the idea that she can own all that land and can reign over all the people who live on her land.
  • Darkcrusade's picture
    Darkcrusade 3 weeks 4 days ago Page Paul Hein
    That's Right. George the 3rd was defeated. Than he gets to set the terms of his surrender at the Treaty of Paris, spelling out debts and how much shall be payed to the Monarch himself. Cornwallis Yorktown surrender statements and Charles march off with all his arms is interesting way for a vanquished foe to 'surrender'. Plus the implementation of the (E)state system of governance brought to you by the King. The contrast is the comparison of Japan's surrender document to the terms of the Treaty of Paris. http://www.suijurisforum.com/wtf-t546-50.html#p12528 http://nikiforcongress.blogspot.com/2004/10/tontine-government-exon.html
  • James Clayton's picture
    James Clayton 3 weeks 4 days ago Page Paul Hein
    The sexes do tend to complement each other nicely, most of the time, which is a good thing for survival and reproduction. And the family may indeed be the only viable governing unit and legitimate "jurisdiction". Parents can certainly “speak the law” and attempt to enforce some rules, but – perhaps just to prove that action speaks louder than words – children can certainly find ways to test the rules (although most adults may have been trained to stop doing this). Families can generally be cohesive groups because individuals can often exhibit a favourable bias towards (genetic) relatives; and from a purely biological perspective we might only seem to be disposable vehicles for self-replicating molecules (those “selfish” genes!), but every human organism can also tend to be fairly self-interested (or “genetically self-interested”, since each person is his/her own closest relative). People probably make choices and take action on the basis of some measure of costs and benefits, and families can certainly provide examples of governing units that can be mutually beneficial, with some sharing of risks and expenses – even without the express consent of the governed.
  • Darkcrusade's picture
    Darkcrusade 3 weeks 5 days ago Page Paul Hein
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRsYwu8uD4I https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3mzYKWDx6YI
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 3 weeks 5 days ago Page Paul Hein
    Nice essay, Paul! And astute in observing also! I read once that women owned 79% of the earth's real property that can be entitled. But if they were so blamed brilliant they could own the other 21% too :-( I've said for years that there is one, and one only "jurisdiction": the family unit. All others are coercive interlopers, sustained by massive superstition and augmented with force of arms. Sam
  • Darkcrusade's picture
    Darkcrusade 4 weeks 6 days ago Page Kevin M. Patten
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YX3nLsWhYJo
  • Darkcrusade's picture
    Darkcrusade 4 weeks 6 days ago
    Ode to Japan
    Page Mark Davis
    Sounds like a great place to visit. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7iEgED_g65I https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P7Z2O9Nwt6c
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 5 weeks 5 hours ago
    Ode to Japan
    Page Mark Davis
    Thank you for the kind words, Glen. The way the local Japanese people reacted to the Fukushima tsunami and nuclear power plant disaster was amazing; with calm resolve and peaceful cooperation throughout the community with no panic, looting or other social breakdowns. There are some great videos on Youtube showing this. I had that incident and a few other anecdotal examples in my original draft, but it was way too long such that I had to cut it down as much as I could and still, hopefully, get my main points across.
  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 5 weeks 22 hours ago
    Ode to Japan
    Page Mark Davis
    Wow! Terrific discussion of the fascinating Japanese culture contrasted with the rotting Marxist Mush of our own. You make good points, naturally, and I especially enjoyed the details about Japan and Japanese society. Japan might be the most interesting modern nation on Earth; weird and wonderful in many ways. You didn't get into the topic of the US pushing nuclear power on Japan or Fukushima and other related problems, but I wonder to what extent we've destroyed the country we helped rebuild after WWII. At any rate, I hadn't given much thought to how Japanese culture, strangely, was helping to protect  early-American values in Japan. Thanks, Mark.
  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 5 weeks 22 hours ago Page Paul Hein
    Great column, Paul -- and incidentally, congrats on entering your ninth decacde. Your BS detector certainly hasn't gotten rusty in your old age! "Thermometer" is a terrific "Emperor's New Clothes" piece on global warming, seasoned with passing references to other "do not question!" BS.
  • rita's picture
    rita 5 weeks 2 days ago Web link felix.ireton
    Most people who die from accidental drug overdose in this country die because the drugs they're using are illegal. This is not an accident. We, as a nation and as a society, have enough experience with drug prohibition to know that the one guaranteed effect that prohibition has on drug use is to make it more dangerous. Blame BiG Pharma and over-prescribing doctors for getting us all addicted; blame unscrupulous drug dealers for adulterated drugs; blame the sick/elderly/handicapped guy down the street who just, for Christ's sake, wants a little relief from pain. But these are not the people who are driving Americans to heroin, they're not the ones allowing tainted drugs to be sold on the streets, who leave our children to die, alone and abandoned, when their experimentation with drugs goes horribly wrong. (Or did you think the only addicts overdose?) No, credit for this so-called "crisis," rests solely at the feet of our own government. Anyone who says differently is either a liar or a fool.
  • James Clayton's picture
    James Clayton 5 weeks 2 days ago
    A Den of Thieves
    Page Paul Hein
    It’s absolutely vital that you understand that the primary means terrocrats use to subjugate, control, and dominate their victims is words. Actually, there are three kinds of "things" terrocrats use to control their victims. The first is violence. The second is money. And the third is words. - from ‘The Anatomy of Slavespeak’ by Frederick Mann   The map is not the territory. - Alfred Korzybski   Using slavespeak and the language of serfdom may indeed lead to a situation where a person tends to think, feel, speak and act like something that could be called a slave or serf, but (to split a few hairs) it does not necessarily mean that a person “is” a slave or serf. Avoiding slavespeak and the language of serfdom (and not accepting the label of slave, serf, taxpayer, etc. or identifying oneself as such) would certainly seem to be a good strategy to avoid thinking and behaving like a slave, serf, taxpayer, etc., but (unfortunately) it won’t necessarily prevent some other people from referring to you as a taxpayer and attempting to treat you like a slave, serf, etc. The words we use might influence the way we think and act, but words (names, titles, labels, designations, etc.) do not – and cannot – show what “I am”; and actions probably speak louder than words. Perhaps an opportunity exists to clarify thinking and to decrease the possibility of some misunderstanding or conflict in some situations by reducing the use of “am/are/is” statements and by expressing what one thinks, feels, says and does; by showing or declaring one’s actions instead of stating what one “is”.
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 5 weeks 2 days ago
    A Den of Thieves
    Page Paul Hein
    Hi Sam, Alex was correct in the rhetorical nature of my comment. A kind assessment of my poor attempt at IRS humor. I pay the robber pointing a gun at me whether they claim officialdom or not, to save my life. Although using their own word games against them can be a source of amusement at times, I have no illusions as to the nature of the "psychopaths... in 'government'" you refer to so eloquently.
  • mishochu's picture
    mishochu 5 weeks 3 days ago Page Glen Allport
    A little nit to pick: "Kindness is yin to non-aggression's yang". No kindness is not an opposing force to non-aggression. Aggression is the yin (dark) to non-aggression's yang (bright/light), not kindness.
  • mishochu's picture
    mishochu 5 weeks 3 days ago Page Glen Allport
    In fact, the bully (regardless of age) will go through great (and ever more complicated) mental leaps to justify hurting people and taking their stuff. Unfortunately, the victims also make such equivocations. I see the non-aggression principle as a form of kindness so I don't think anything needs to be added to it.
  • James Clayton's picture
    James Clayton 5 weeks 3 days ago Page Glen Allport
    Perhaps everything we do can be reduced to some measure of costs and benefits from some perspective (the benefits might be relative, or negligible, or only anticipated, or intangible). Human behaviour includes generosity, kindness, cooperation, collaboration, competition and conflict. Obviously all behaviour is not mutually beneficial. Aggressive behaviour might always be a potential strategy, and perhaps there will always be some people who will sometimes behave aggressively if the aggressive behaviour seems to provide some benefits (possibly to obtain material and social resources for survival and reproduction, to gain and maintain wealth and power and status, etc.). Maybe people who behave aggressively can be persuaded (both emotionally and logically, and even “selfishly”) to change the way they act if the benefits (for themselves) of non-aggression outweigh the costs (to themselves) of aggression.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 5 weeks 3 days ago
    A Den of Thieves
    Page Paul Hein
    Welcome back, Sam!  Where have you been?
  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 5 weeks 3 days ago Page Glen Allport
    Hi Darkcrusade,   You make good points. The support for love in the Christian faith is important, and has indeed done much good in the world. That said, Christians (people who call themselves that, and who have in most cases had years of bible study and sermons, etc) are all over the map in their levels of empathy, kindness, and non-aggression -- which I'm sure I don't need to detail here. I'm not a Christian as most people understand the word, but I consider Jesus' core teachings to be these below and I believe that together, they are an amazing gift to mankind -- one that powerfully supports kindness, especially to children, the group from which every society grows. [King James translation from The Bible Gateway]:   Matthew: 
18:1 At the same time came the disciples unto Jesus, saying, Who is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven? 
 18:2 And Jesus called a little child unto him, and set him in the midst of them, 
 18:3 And said, Verily I say unto you, Except ye be converted, and become as little children, ye shall not enter into the kingdom of heaven. 
 18:4 Whosoever therefore shall humble himself as this little child, 
the same is greatest in the kingdom of heaven. 
 18:5 And whoso shall receive one such little child in my name receiveth me. 
 18:6 But whoso shall offend one of these little ones which believe in me, it were better for him that a millstone were hanged about his neck, and that he were drowned in the depth of the sea.    Mark: 
10:13: And they brought young children to him, that he should touch them: and his disciples rebuked those that brought them. 
 10:14: But when Jesus saw it, he was much displeased, and said unto them, Suffer the little children to come unto me, and forbid them not: for of such is the kingdom of God. 
 10:15: Verily I say unto you, Whosoever shall not receive the kingdom of God as a little child, he shall not enter therein.    Luke: 
17:21 Neither shall they say, Lo here! or, lo there! for, behold, the kingdom of God is within you.   John: 
13:34 A new commandment I give unto you, That ye love one another; as I have loved you, that ye also love one another. 
 13:35 By this shall all men know that ye are my disciples, if ye have love one to another.   
  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 5 weeks 3 days ago Page Glen Allport
    > Non-aggression is a completely foreign idea to people that do not first develop a value-laden system which includes a "Kindness Imperative"   I believe you're right, Mark [I thought I was appending this to Mark's comment above]. It's not a logical necessity -- one can imagine intelligent robots or other AI coming to value something like the NAP for purely logical reasons (commerce works better when aggression is kept at bay, for instance) but humans are not machines and empathy (and thus kindness) is the most important form of "logic" here. Non-aggression is appealing to humans less for upper-brain logic and more because we all want to be free of aggression ourselves, and any sense of fairness we might have makes the NAP an obvious general principle.   This is why war-mongers, serial killers, rapists, and so on usually don't change their stripes even when the NAP is explained to them.
  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 5 weeks 3 days ago Page Glen Allport
    Hi Jim,   "Imperative" needn't imply compulsion, and of course I am not suggesting coercion of any type. I'm suggesting that widespread kindness is essential to civil society, and to healthy human life, for that matter. I am also stating that widespread kindness in society is a necessary foundation for the NAP; people with little empathy -- psychopaths for instance -- are not likely to follow the Non-Aggression Principle no matter how often we explain it to them.   As I said, the way to more kindness really involves love and freedom for the young (certainly something Jesus made clear, although one needn't be of any particular religious faith to agree; see Summerhill School for a real-world example). There is no push-button fix here; no executive order, no political plan, no logical argument that will bring more empathy to life. Logic and feeling are different realms.   From the dictionary supplied with MacOS: imperative |əmˈperədiv|   adjective 1 of vital importance; crucial: immediate action was imperative | [with clause] : it is imperative that standards be maintained. 2 giving an authoritative command; peremptory: the bell pealed again, a final imperative call. {This definition is the one causing confusion here, I imagine -- Glen}   noun 1 an essential or urgent thing: free movement of labor was an economic imperative. • a factor or influence making something necessary: the change came about through a financial imperative.
  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 5 weeks 3 days ago Page Glen Allport
    "Imperative" has more than one definition, which might be an issue here, but the term certainly fits my intended meaning. Here's the first definition from the dictionary that comes with MacOS: Imperative: of vital importance; crucial
  • James Clayton's picture
    James Clayton 5 weeks 4 days ago
    A Den of Thieves
    Page Paul Hein
    An excerpt from ‘Language and Genetic Self-Interest’: “those who advocate for free market capitalism do so because free market capitalism serves their genetic interests. They intuitively know that they will outperform most others in this system. They will then justify this intuition of genetic self-interest using language, decrying wealth transfers as ‘violations of the NAP’ or violations of religions tenets against theft, etc. Those who intuit that they will not be as competitive in a free market capitalist system will create arguments which defend wealth transfers or outright theft.” https://poseidonawoke.wordpress.com/2016/03/13/language-and-genetic-self-interest/
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 5 weeks 6 days ago
    A Den of Thieves
    Page Paul Hein
    One more comment to Mr. Paul Hein (before my time runs out on the government ["public" ha ha] library compooter): This is one of your better articles, Paul. It shows that you are not frustrated over the fact that those lunatics who hide under the mantle of that brainless abstraction called "state" are stupid at best, asinine on down the scale; yet powerless to extract much in the absence of "voluntary compliance". I don't think Marc Stevens has ever claimed much in the way of "success" at quelling the robbery that is "Internal Revenue Service". He has helped execute their tendency to be "...hoist by their own petard..." a few times. But being associated with that outfit means one need never be embarrassed by being exposed to her own stupidity. Their stock in trade is in the eternal hope by the ignorant masses that someday, some way, government -- the state, "Our Great Nation", "our Beloved Country" -- will make sense. The enormity of the truth is incredible. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 5 weeks 6 days ago
    A Den of Thieves
    Page Paul Hein
    Robbing the conquered is the prime axiom in the science of rulership. That is much more easily accomplished when the masses -- especially the ever-growing "libertarian" masses -- use language of serfdom. "The-Rulers" falls into that category. "Our Betters", or "our leaders" (even in jest) much more so. "Our Representatives" written by "libertarians" causes me nausea. "Taxpayer" is the first requiem in the composition of state. The masses must be propagandized to think of themselves as "taxpayers". By the psychopaths who hide under the obfuscation called "government", that is an absolutely essential ingredient. I was once labeled by those lunatics as "Illegal Tax Protestor". Due to classical "legal" folderol, they've changed that designation to "tax resistor". So, Mark -- call yourself what you like. I, for instance, am a "non-robber", a "non-murderer", etc etc. You could also call me a "state denier" if you like. It won't change what I am -- a free, sovereign state. And, for Mr. Davies' sake, it won't change the fact that my door could be broken down by crazy, dangerously armed bastards in state costumes at any moment. And, of course, that could also be done by private entrepreneurs engaging in the business of robbery. "Jurisdiction", for the practicing anarchist, exists only with force of arms. There is no other authority in existence, other than that of the loving parent for her child. Sam
  • James Clayton's picture
    James Clayton 5 weeks 6 days ago
    A Den of Thieves
    Page Paul Hein
    Paul, “The Rulers” (a term they would appreciate) will certainly try to take money from you, but it’s not really “your” money. As you know, state-sanctioned monetary and taxation systems are both designed to rob you.
  • Darkcrusade's picture
    Darkcrusade 6 weeks 4 hours ago Page Kevin M. Patten
    "but a level of white privilege is unavoidably true." ??? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=phPXTWJhnYM https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tC1gRZ6pEko
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 6 weeks 1 day ago
    A Den of Thieves
    Page Paul Hein
    I realize your question is rhetorical, Mark, but for the benefit of the uninitiated (if there are any such here), one means precisely zero to the political class, the other is part of their vampire lifeblood.
  • Darkcrusade's picture
    Darkcrusade 6 weeks 1 day ago Page Glen Allport
    All very unnecessary when considering the genesis of NAP. Matthew 7:12 1599 Geneva Bible (GNV) 12 [a]Therefore whatsoever ye would that men should do to you: even so do ye to them: for this is the [b]Law and the Prophets. This, The Law and the Prophets. Notice the active imperative of the sentence structure in Christ Jesus's words? Not, Don't do to others? Matt.7:12 Encompasses Christian Charity. Christians have built more Hospitals ,more Orphanages ,more universities and charitable organizations than any. Yet some deviations from the teachings of Christ and the Bible(the fallen wolves in sheep clothing that are in all institutions.) are overwhelmingly countered by the Christians good works and novel institutions of care, compassion, and justice. Carlton Hayes wrote, “From the wellspring of Christian compassion, our Western civilization has drawn its inspiration, and its sense of duty, for feeding the hungry, giving drink to the thirsty, looking after the homeless, clothing the naked, tending the sick and visiting the prisoner.” The State even attempts to Replace Charity. Our Enemy the state> "We can get some kind of rough measure of this general atrophy by our own disposition when approached by a beggar. Two years ago we might have been moved to give him something; today we are moved to refer him to the State's relief-agency. The State has said to society, You are either not exercising enough power to meet the emergency, or are exercising it in what I think is an incompetent way, so I shall confiscate your power, and exercise it to suit myself. Hence when a beggar asks us for a quarter, our instinct is to say that the State has already confiscated our quarter for his benefit, and he should go to the State about it."
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 6 weeks 1 day ago
    A Den of Thieves
    Page Paul Hein
    An accurate summary of the sad situation. "The problem with making legal arguments is that the parties making the laws also administer, enforce, and adjudicate them..." nails it.   Marc Stevens does excellent work. Has he taken his innocent and penetrating questions into court opposing the Infernal Robbery Syndicate?
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 6 weeks 1 day ago
    A Den of Thieves
    Page Paul Hein
    I wonder if one could get away with identifying as a non-taxpayer? If a man can legally identify himself as a woman based on his own cognition, then anyone should be able to use the same legal grounds to identify as a non-taxpayer.
  • emartin's picture
    emartin 6 weeks 1 day ago
    A Den of Thieves
    Page Paul Hein
    Every time a member of the "den of thieves, a gang of robbers" murders, cheats or steals from me or a member of my family they are damaging my genes. I'm pretty much convinced that their genes are fair game. It seems that it's the only thing that will wake up their worthless asses.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 6 weeks 2 days ago
    A Den of Thieves
    Page Paul Hein
    Very nicely done, Paul.  Worthy of sharing widely.  :-)
  • D. Saul Weiner's picture
    D. Saul Weiner 6 weeks 2 days ago Page Glen Allport
    Good points here about the need for something to complement the NAP. It seems to me that one of the barriers to a "laissez faire" mindset is the lack of faith (for lack of a better term) in freedom itself. Typically, libertarians will take this to mean that people need to be educated in free market economics. And that can help, if people are open to such an undertaking. But the problem may be more spiritual in origin. Most people seem to lack the belief that life will "work out" as long as they do their part. That is why they become control freaks, or are receptive to the messages of control freaks. So there may be some need for spiritual development that goes beyond embracing kindness and compassion, as important as those 2 qualities are.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 6 weeks 3 days ago Page Glen Allport
    Surely, the NAP is very simple to understand. Try explaining it to any 4-year-old bully, in terms such as "Don't hurt people, and don't take their stuff." He will get it, easy as pie. If he fails to act accordingly, the reason will not be a lack of intellectual power, but a lack of will powe
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 7 weeks 6 hours ago Page Glen Allport
    I can't speak for Glen, but my view is that no single ideal or principle can exist in a vacuum. Some like to promote democracy as the fountain of liberty from which a free society must flow, but it too is obviously insufficient to bring about a free society; indeed, democracy is often used to justify the existence of the state. I agree wholeheartedly that the NAP is a solid foundation (first premise) from which to build a logical argument supporting a free society. I suppose it is my faith in the ability of logic to convince a sufficient number of people to accept the NAP as the core of their personal philosophy that is lacking in this context.   Love and kindness are simple concepts that can be grasped by people who do not understand or even care about logic. People who do not believe in the power of love and kindness to improve the quality of their lives and their relationships with others will never accept the NAP because aggression is too handy of a tool for getting what they want. Self-interest too often overwhelms logical arguments on an emotional level such that intellectual considerations become secondary, at best, and irrelevant at worst. So, IMO, we need to offer arguments for a free society that make sense on an emotional level in addition to just logical arguments on an itellectual level if we are ever to appeal to enough people to accomplish our common goal. 
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 7 weeks 11 hours ago Page Glen Allport
    We may have to differ on that, Mark. If I understand Glen correctly, he's saying that the NAP is not enough; that it needs kindness to be added. I join all who very much hope it will be, but don't see it as a prerequisite to a free society; whereas the NAP certainly is.   Consider an analogy with medicine. Primary principle of treatment: "First, do no harm." That's been in place for centuries (though often inadvertently violated.) That's like the NAP. Start by not aggressing. That brings peace and freedom. Then by all means build on it with acts of kindness, random and otherwise, as in medicine treatment is added to harmlessness.   But the distinctive purpose of anarcho-libertarians, surely, is to stop the aggression. Today's society is full of it, starting with the major evil act known as voting. Stop hurting people and stealing their stuff, and there is a foundation on which positive good actions can be based; but as libertarians, I don't see that as part of what we're promoting.
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 7 weeks 1 day ago Page Glen Allport
    I don't think imperative is too strong a word because it is a vital, crucial and essential ingredient in a free society. I would go further and posit that the Non-Aggression Principle would never be considered, much less discussed, in a society that does not have a culture that highly values kindness. Non-aggression is a completely foreign idea to people that do not first develop a value-laden system which includes a "Kindness Imperative".