Recent comments

  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 6 days 8 hours ago Page Mark Davis
    Terrific essay, Mark! Filled with pithy, quotable truths and with a clear and honest view of things. Nicely done!
  • DP_Thinker's picture
    DP_Thinker 1 week 2 days ago Page Mark Davis
    Excellent article! Definitely succinct and thoroughly clear in putting the criticisms of both the socialists and the let's not forget power hungry fascists that seek to rule everyone else. I would also add another quote by Mahatma Gandhi that came to mind as I was reading this "First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they attack you, then you win." It would seem to me that we are at the attack stage. So even though we may have entered a new chapter in the anti-libertarian mindset, maybe we are closer to victory than we thought!
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 1 week 2 days ago Page Mark Davis
    Mark, you've crystallized it here!  Fantastic job!  I just finished having another one of these fruitless debates with a hardline (and now Blocked) socialist on Facebook.  Time to spread this essay far and wide!
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 1 week 2 days ago
    Just a Bou Bou
    Page Tim Hartnett
    "Acted on wrong information". Most raids I presume are warrant collected via un-vetted caller is who unknown. At a conjecture, I'll guess at least 80% plus. "Jury fails to convict". Well I'll be damned. My ongoing question is shouldn't the judge be the one held liable? He is the one signing the warrant. Since there is no evidence that the current tyrannies are going away anytime soon, I must concede that all LEO's undergo intensive psychological evaluations, and each enforcement agency develop and implement an accountability training which would be ongoing. Will that really solve the problem? "Television isn't helping..." I would like to join in here and say it is, because I think maybe LEO's are watching Jack Bauer and imitating, filling out their fantasies. How many here have, in their very youthful state played "cops and robbers". I am guessing most of us actually wanted the cop role? Fighting back doesn't appear to be a safe method, given that the DOD has been, for years doling out armored cars, bayonets and etc. Enforcement agencies are becoming heavily armed. Who wants to see a tank rolling down their driveway?
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 1 week 4 days ago
    Just a Bou Bou
    Page Tim Hartnett
    Paul, I wonder when people will start fighting back?  When they decide that they have nothing to lose because the cops are already so heavy handed, I suppose.
  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 1 week 4 days ago Page Glen Allport
    Yes, Sam, insanity IS the social norm. I have to say that some of the womens' stories in this sorry Cosby drama are more detailed and (to me) believable than you suggest, but whether he's guilty or not, the tactic you describe works fine -- just as the Reichstag fire "worked" for the Nazis no matter who started the flames and the 9/11 attacks "worked" for the neocons regardless of who the perps were. Keeping the public focused on trivia, minor scandals, and small-time individual criminals does wonders to keep attention off the Big Picture crimes being carried out daily but ignored by the media.
  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 1 week 4 days ago Page Glen Allport
    You've hit the nail on the head, Paul: an economic crash -- a REAL one, an end-of-the-world sort of crash -- might get people to actually rethink things, although I wonder how many will come to reasonable conclusions. In any case, we've got a crash like that coming right up, apparently. My guess is it's coming in the next few months, or possibly later this evening. Wish I thought the results would be positive.
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 1 week 4 days ago Page Shaquille Brisset
    The police in Japan typically don't carry guns and are more like community service officers than law enforcement like we have here.   They are friendly, polite, educated and try to get to know the people in the area that they are working.  Tokyo has millions of people in a small area, yet it has the crime problems of a small rural town in America and you almost never notice cops beause there are so few.  The Japanese have very strong family and neighborhood ties which helps keep crime down and little need for police.  The police are glad to help with lost and found items and give out directions to tourists with little interest in making drug busts or getting macho.  The policy of surveying people twice a year is looked at as a courtesy for getting to know the people in a neighborhood and it is voluntary; you can say "no" you don't want to talk to them and they will smile, thank you and go away.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 1 week 4 days ago Page Glen Allport
    The "allegations" against Cosby are obvious divide-and-conquer piffle. Cosby has been lampooned and scuttled. Groupies scorned are loose cannons indeed -- and none volunteer as to why they "happened" to be in his room 10 or 15 years ago, or for what. You make good analogies here. Keep the hoi polloi wigging and wagging about alleged sex malfeasance by prominent and successful individuals and they will never waver from their celebration of the most evil, murderous group of psychopaths known to man. Insanity is, without question, the social norm. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 1 week 4 days ago
    Just a Bou Bou
    Page Tim Hartnett
    Once one sets out to make sense out of monopoly state lunatics, she has succumbed to the insanity that brought it all about in the first place. Abstain from beans, my friends. That might appear to be a small step. But it is a step. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 1 week 4 days ago Web link A. Magnus
    Of course it's important to note that the "letter" is to the beast that is addicted to war as the bulwark of its "health". Letters to those psychopaths who make up "Bundestags" and "Reichstags" and "Parliments" and "Legislatures" et al., have about the import of a letter to Santa Clause. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 1 week 4 days ago Page Shaquille Brisset
    Addendum: I referred to the old "This I Believe" radio show, with Ed Murrow and his jangling of the 50's -- on which I cut my eye teeth (and eventually had to exorcise in order to acquire liberty and freedom). But in googling after my comment I see there is one still on the web. I strongly suspect that none of the "beliefs" we've shared with each other here at STR could ever see the light of day on their site. I'm sure they only accept collectivist, teary-eyed pablum that passes for conventional wisdom amongst the unwashed masses -- that which supports, aggrandizes and promotes legitimacy of the chicanery of psychopaths organized under the mantle of "state". But don't let this dissuade you from giving it a try. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 1 week 4 days ago Page Shaquille Brisset
    First I'd like to welcome you aboard, Shaquille. There have been a number of "gun control" theses, and you present a good one with your own distinct analogy and set of references. STR needs new essay writers (although there are still many willing to "take the heat" and continue to make good presentations). I see with not a little angst many sites that previously stood for true freedom and liberty sort of falling by the wayside. I strongly suspect a part of that might be the push for "NAP" (non-aggression principle), which may have spilled over into a general reluctance on the part of freedom lovers to to "aggress" by submitting comments that might be construed as criticism, or as bringing the substance of an essay into contention. And, without controversial essays and lively debate, sites like STR quickly become fallow and risk demise. I recall a few essays (particularly those with "g-d" or "religion" in the topic) that elicited well over a hundred comments and wrestled on for weeks or even months. More than one packed up his glove and ball and left the playing field -- not a very "libertarian" approach, but happened nonetheless. From the essay: "Obviously by virtue of their occupation, criminals do not obey the law..." Second, I think it is important that one identify in her own mind what "criminal" is. Because (imho) there are free market criminals and there are non-free market criminals. The non-free marketers are the dangerous ones -- the ones most of us find ourselves blogging about. They are those who claim (by their armaments and their increasing willingness to use them on "..their own 'citizens'..") to exclusively possess a substance so many like to refer to as "jurisdiction". And if they have you convinced in your own heart that they indeed possess that magical substance -- that they represent "our" government -- their mission is 95% successful. I submit that the human family is the only legitimate governing unit. You start your essay with that analogy (then relate it to central "authority" as in the u.s. district of collectivism). Unlike most animals, newborn human beings are totally dependent upon adult care and supervision -- hopefully with loving and dedicated Moms and Dads. Although we encounter horror stories of moms or dads who have flung their newborn into a well or manhole, 99% of Moms would never think of withholding their breast from their cherished newborn. We swaddle them and protect them and prevent from danger -- those children we love. When you become a parent you have jurisdiction, whether you like it or not. It is a jurisdiction of love -- the only true and authentic jurisdiction. And that jurisdiction extends on out for a number of years. The Statlers sang a line in one of their songs, "...things get complicated when you get past eighteen..." As a matter of fact, genuine jurisdiction has a way of reversing itself in time. Ever now and again libertarians will come up with the topic for discussion, "...do parents own their children..."? And that, of course, always elicits opinion from all sides. Because, as Thomas Pynchon is credited with having said, "...If they can keep you asking the wrong questions, they don't have to worry about answers." In time -- and in enduring, loving families -- the children ultimately inherit jurisdiction over elderly parents. Two of my daughters (I have seven kids -- five now over 50) have conservatorship over my accounts. That's done in our culture for a number of reasons -- one (and primarily) as a "legal" tactic to keep the white man's fingers away from the cup cakes. So I often badger them, that one nod to the white man and they can have me locked away forever and forever! Genuine jurisdiction, as I said above, is a jurisdiction of love -- and trust. In the world tomorrow -- after human government systems have been bankrupt and skuttled -- jurisdiction and legitimate contracts will be those based upon trust. This I believe. (Anyone here old enough to remember those old "This-I-Believe" radio shows?) Sam
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 1 week 4 days ago Page Glen Allport
    "What will it take to get people to re-evaluate the positive views they have been taught since childhood about the most destructive force on this Earth – coercive government, an organization defined by its coercive and thus criminal nature?" An economic crash ought to do it.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 1 week 4 days ago
    Just a Bou Bou
    Page Tim Hartnett
    "Without external pressure, meaning the penitentiary, common and unconnected citizens will continue to be preyed upon with impunity." Well, either that, or just respond to the attacks in kind. I suspect it will end when the economy crashes and people become tired of being preyed on.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 1 week 4 days ago Web link A. Magnus
    Thank you Germans. Heaven help us against the mad beasts in Washington DC. Is it time for a 50-state secession yet? We don't want to wait until the missiles start flying...
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 1 week 4 days ago Page Shaquille Brisset
    If I read this right, you seem to be accepting the premise that the rulers intend to protect us, while questioning their ability to do it properly. The premise is wrong. Far from wanting to protect us, their major project is to act as a parasite on us. Parasites do not protect.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 2 weeks 1 day ago Web link Mike Powers
    As usual, the wrong question is presented. "The law" has nothing to do with anything. Voting at elections in support of Psychopathic monopoly is the culprit. Psychopathic prosecutors have a case if they say they have a case -- no matter the law or the charge or the evidence. Grand juries are rubber stamps. Theirs is a monopoly upon violence. The collectivist hordes called "Leviathan" make laws, enforce laws, prosecute laws, hire prosecutors, license "defense" attorneys, pay "judges", build jails, contract jails to private entities, employ and pay "wardens", employ and pay guards, employ and pay "parole officers" -- all with stolen resources and under penalty of contingent death for those who dare defend themselves against state agents' criminal aggression. Good work if you can get it. Sam
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 2 weeks 2 days ago Web link KenK
    "Giuliani said the insertion of race into the [Garner] case is unwarranted and that a white man breaking the law would have seen the same result." Quite true, but ah...that's the point, Mr Mayor. In the end, defy the state, and you're liable to die, whatever race you happen to be, (although some get smacked down a little  harder than others it seems). Government isn't justice, reason, or kindly. It is ultimately force.
  • tomcat's picture
    tomcat 2 weeks 3 days ago Web link A. Magnus
    Thailand is just another example that a majority decision is not the ultima ratio of wisdom and moral. A Majority of poor ricefarmers and other have-nots engaged in some sort of cargo cult and tried to vote themselves the treasure. Nothing said about the ousted shinawatra clan and the rice scheme. No word about who really started using deadly violence in riots of 2010 and 2013. I am living here for several years now.With or without an elected government: Thailand doesnt work like any western state and thats a good thing. Don't cheat, don't steal, don't get violent, don't insult the king. Apart from that, do as you please. The State leaves you very much alone. Little to no buerocracy, so much more freedom in everyday life.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 2 weeks 5 days ago Web link KenK
    Thanks, dhowlander. Sometimes makes us feel like proverbial voices in the wilderness -- with no echo. :-) Sam
  • tomcat's picture
    tomcat 2 weeks 5 days ago Web link Emmett Harris
    The aging Germany and shortage of skilled workers: There are several lobbyist groups that push for more immigration: The parts of the administration that handle welfare as well as big charitable organisations like Charitas and Arwo who are in the same business. Its about state funding, the annual distribution of taxmoney. The more "clients" they have, the bigger parts of the cake they can claim, the better for them. And then there are the Employers, the big corporations with their constant complaints about the acute shortage of skilled labour. Acute Shortage meets high demand, now you might expect an abundance of well paid jobs. In this case you expect to much, at least for the last 10 to 15 years. Here its only to create an even greater oversupply of potential (skilled or unskilled)workers on the labour market. Anyway these are not the 1960ies anymore, what young Person with a university degree is supposed to come to Germany to "work for food and housing"? Instead many of the People that really do come are rather a burden for the existing society, except for the aforementioned lobbyist groups.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 2 weeks 6 days ago Web link Government Deni...
    Should I, an anarchist, be "outraged" -- "shocked" -- at this news? I say no! In fact, I'm happy to see published reports -- even if mostly at "alternative news" sites -- outlining the nature of the beast. Because this not something new. It has been covertly and overtly the political "plank" for hundreds and hundreds of years, since the first khans conquered the first settlements and tribes and caravans and set up the precursors of what we know as the state(<==PDF). And I know the "system" can't be fixed, or improved upon. Leviathan can and will only become larger and larger and more and more coercive and abusive -- as long as there are dupes to aggrandize his machinations -- until a critical mass of current mini-statists become anarchists and pull each and every senator and representative claiming to represent "him." off their pedestals. Everywhere. Across and around the entirety of the globe. Until the psychopaths calling themselves "state" present one of their bread-and-circus events ("elections") and nobody -- nobody -- registers to "vote". Or perhaps only 1% or 2% of "eligibles", (who will represent mainly government employees after the implosion occurs) will "...get out the vote...". A fun time to be alive, Mates! But please, abstain from beans. Sam
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 2 weeks 6 days ago Web link Government Deni...
    Gupta over thinks the whole issue IMHO. Digital currency is perfect for transactions of a dubious or flat out illegal nature, and that's about it. As long as the Internet and  phone system hold up we can all switch over to hawalla style payment systems. At least that's how I see it. The real thing about "money" is that it represents saved effort, or saved worked.  If people have no way or means to bank or save or cache the value of their surplus work, then commercial activity as such drastically declines, and we're back to being hunters, gatherers, and subsistence farmers. That's why  money must exist for a modern life and I don't think Gupta's ideas about digital money solves that problem or even addresses it. My two cents.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 2 weeks 6 days ago Web link Government Deni...
    From the article: "...But if civilization breaks down, almost any store of value becomes useless very quickly..." I'd want to know how the writer (an apparent "guru" in the eyes of some) defines "civilization". Because that occurrence (the "breaking down" -- which, too, would need more clear definition) could mean the beginning of our ever-sought-after liberty and freedom. But not without lots of pain for lots of folks -- mostly those still clinging to the statist mindset. Because in their minds, yes, the only "secure" ownership requires monopoly state to "protect" it and grant "title". And they represent a huge plurality -- even a very large number of writers of "libertarian" philosophy. Read this (it's very long -- skip down to the "comments" and see how poor old Sam got himself lambasted in his use of "the white man" :-) TEOTMSAWKI will eventually arrive. How that will pan out I know not. But it appears the calamity will be global -- there is no "sound money" anywhere. And you can't eat gold. So it would probably be prudent to increase your stock of canned goods, staples with long shelf lives, and resources to produce and garner edibles and shelter; rather than hoard precious metals. But precious metals will always be good stores of value -- I think. I am not at this time convinced that so-called "digital stores of value" will survive usurpation of psychopaths hiding under the mantle of "state". That may be because I'm old and not savvy to the digital age as are you younger geeks. Sam
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 2 weeks 6 days ago Web link Government Deni...
    Whatever gold's disadvantages are, and there are a few, the fact remains that gold is what it is; gold is gold, and has historically never been worth zero, whatever happens. The interviewee's opinion that you'd need to have an army of guards to protect your gold is ludicrious. Most people could convert their entire net worth into gold bars or coin and it wouldn't even half way fill a family sized gun safe. I am not an economist but that's how it seems to me. "I own the house I live in," Mr. Gupta says, "but that house next door that I’m renting to you? The reason it’s mine, is because the state says it is. The ability to do large scale capital accumulation without having to need a private army is basically an artefact of pre-existing law." By this reasoning the only way to securely own anything more than the clothes on your back is to have a state that will let you own things, at its pleasure, for now. There are some store owners in Ferguson, MO who have been dispossessed recently when the state of MO sat on its hands and let mobs loot & burn their property for political reasons. Gupta seems to be saying that digital stores of value are fine as long as the cat and mouse game with the state stays friendly (i.e., non-violent) and low key, or did I get this wrong?  
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 3 weeks 1 day ago Blog entry Emmett Harris
    Movers to NH might wish to consider buying this house. It has an honorable history and is offered for a real bargain price.   There are a couple of unusual features, and a conscientious buyer would wish to return it to its previous owners if they ever emerge from a government cage, but it's still a rare opportunity.
  • reinkefj's picture
    reinkefj 3 weeks 1 day ago Web link A. Magnus
    Hopefully, the Swiss will "set the edge" that moves “We, The Sheeple” back from the fiat currency disaster.
  • dhowlandjr's picture
    dhowlandjr 3 weeks 5 days ago Web link KenK
    Thanks for the comment, Sam. I enjoyed reading the Nock essay. I agree that lately my favorite page of several years now, Strike the Root, seems to be lacking in encouraging content. I still enjoy the occasional root striker original article, although they seem to be less and less frequent. People need to know about all the bad things the cops, congress, etc. are doing, but we also need some solutions, no I'm not talking about voting or bombing. Anyway, i'm probably almost as free as you, and having a great time living in a pretty much voluntary world for several years now. I think we need to look for ways to get by without depending on all that coercion. I admire all the things I see you writing, don't give up on the remnant.
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 4 weeks 2 days ago Web link KenK
    That's good advice, Sam. Too often, we forget about Mr. Nock and Isaiah. Lawrence
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 4 weeks 2 days ago Web link KenK
    This is an interesting post to be on an "anarchist" website. Because it points up the lack of imaginability of a totally free world amongst 99.999% of the unwashed (or even the washed -- especially the washed) masses. No comprehension of complete and unmitigated individualism. In fact, methinks placing "ism" at the end of "individual" makes it an oxymoron; so I should perhaps rephrase that to read "complete and unmitigated liberty and freedom for all individuals". That otta cover it. Because, as anybody who knows me will recognize (to the chagrin of not a few), I've come to believe that how I speak and how I phrase the thoughts that occur and linger between my ears portends how free I will be capable of becoming, and when -- or if. Can't speak for you (even though I catch myself doing it). I'm not in the least convinced that my freedom (or yours) depends upon the actions of others. Oh, I wish you would abstain from beans. But if you're reading this you probably already so abstain. It would be fun if they would hold an election and nobody -- nobody showed up. I don't expect that will happen in my lifetime. My liberty or lack thereof does not depend upon you becoming free (I hope you do). Or how I phrase to you what I write here. Or how I present my "doctrine(s)" to you concerning what constitutes freedom and liberty (or lack thereof) -- in my opinion, which doesn't amount to much -- to you (not that it should). My freedom does not require government, that mindless abstraction that hides hordes of psychopaths under "its" mantle, to end anytime soon. It might be years before the complete and final collapse (TEOTMSAWKI?) -- and I don't have that many years to spare. When I die I'm going to take the world with me. My world (including my sovereign state). I intend for it to be a free world. And that's up to me. So how about that mass of turf that exists along a place statist geographers have come to call the "Horn of Africa"? Armin Rosen seems to think part of it ("Somalia"?) amounts to a nation-state, while the other ("Somaliland"?) is a nation. Or was it the other way around? He starts his article by referring to "The unrecognized state of Somaliland", to which I'm tempted to ask, "...unrecognized by whom?..." But that sorta makes my point: most, even far too many "anarchists", have no way of evaluating any parcel of land upon which human beings reside in any other manner than a political one. That's going to be a hard nut to crack for those who insist that "we" need to busy ourselves to proselytize liberty and freedom to the world (whatever "world" means to you). Rosen goes on along that part of the place called Africa naming off other tracts of land sustaining many additional human beings who have managed to get themselves roped and constrained by fictitious lines in the sand called political boundaries, or borders: "...Djibouti is a dictatorship, Ethiopia is an autocracy..." He applies political labels to each. And he is concerned, because "Somaliland" must "get along" for pity sake. At the end he has a solution to the "Somaliland recognition problem" -- lunatics calling themselves "The-United-States" need to pass an additional "act" of one kind or another. Temporarily. Yes sir ree, Bob! I don't give a hoot about Black's or Webster's or anybody else's definitions. Jurisdiction -- wherever and whenever and by whomever it is claimed -- is accompanied by the threat of deadly weapons. That's all. I always believe a man with a loaded gun. I'm sui juris. So are you. Sovereign states, if you want to put it that way. STR has gone fallow. I ran across an old Albert J. Nock essay from 1936 that might serve to explain why. Worth a read. Too many of us may have ignored The Remnant. Sam
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 4 weeks 5 days ago Web link Emmett Harris
    Hah. Indeed he is. Down the rabbit hole: Do academic discussions of political theory belong to the world of make-believe?  
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 4 weeks 5 days ago Web link Emmett Harris
    Metro Seattle has the worst traffick of any place I have ever lived. Stands to reason private traffic direction efforts would emerge cuz because they are very much needed and desired.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 4 weeks 5 days ago Web link Emmett Harris
    For the life of me I cannot understand the appeal of programs like this. Perhaps as a one-off documentary or something, then maybe, but a program featuring daily life in a jail? Don't get it at all.
  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 5 weeks 1 day ago Page Glen Allport
    Thanks, Mark. Yes, it does seem easier to move things in the wrong direction than to move them back in a healthy direction after corruption, coercion, and neurosis have become entrenched. It is encouraging to me that loving and respectful treatment, even of [young] problem children (many early Summerhill pupils had been expelled from other schools) and of psychopaths [starting at birth], pretty reliably creates empathic adults with integrity. Fixing damage after it has been done is almost impossible in the case of psychopaths and is very hard even in the case of fairly normal neurotics.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 5 weeks 5 days ago Web link Emmett Harris
    "It is common sense that the same philosophy should guide any service that is based on the transmission of information — whether a phone call, or a packet of data," Obama said. Hey, why stop there? Newspapers are transmission of information too. I guess we have no Bill of Rights any more. Whatever happened to "Congress shall make no law..."? The ruling class has been trying to grab control over the Internet ever since it slipped out of their hands as a military communication system. Ferreting out child porn didn't do it for them, but this mushy euphemism, "net neutrality", which boils down to marxism, might do it. The government schools have done their jobs; the people think government fixes problems rather than causing them. Maybe after "net neutrality" we should have equality in transportation, too. Force manufacturers to charge the same price for every car they make.
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 5 weeks 5 days ago Page Glen Allport
    Excellent, as always, Glen.  The short time preference that most people develop under the influence of primary education providers growing up today is a reinforcing mechanism that goes hand-in-hand with adult sympathies for the use coercion; this cycle of abuse will be difficult to overcome.  Patience, longer time preferences and opposition to the use of coercion are learned behaviors from early childhood that must be promoted by adults if we are to spread love and compassion and eliminate institutionalized coercion.  Again, well said, Glen.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 5 weeks 6 days ago Web link KenK
    After picking 20+ quills out of my dog's head/neck one year I was awfully tempted to put a .357 round through the prickly little bastard's head. But that's how dogs learn, assuming they don't die, so I let it go. Lol.  Those quills break off at the tip and infect too. That dog came through being  hit by a car and bit by a snake better than he did sniffing at a porky's lair. Go figure?
  • eugenedw's picture
    eugenedw 6 weeks 1 day ago Web link KenK
    I am too lazy to go look it up now, but there is also a video somewhere of two honey badgers kicking the bejesus out of a couple of lions. Don't underestimate the little guy. :-)
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 6 weeks 4 days ago Web link Westernerd
    I have just become a gross old cynic in these times. I am half tempted to shut down and become disengaged from the pile that grows. I can't stop it and no matter how old I get, it won't change a thing. Thanks for your encouragement and support. I am just so tired and it will never be over with.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 7 weeks 2 hours ago
    Menda City, D.C.
    Blog entry Jim Davies
    Thanks Glen. One wonders if any of them ever tell the truth - and how one would detect it, if they did.   It would be fun if the name stuck, and circulated around social media. One thing they really hate is being ridiculed.
  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 7 weeks 8 hours ago
    Menda City, D.C.
    Blog entry Jim Davies
    Ha! Menda City, great little characterization there.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 7 weeks 2 days ago Web link KenK
    Since I posted on "monopoly justice" a few minutes ago I won't belabor this issue. Except to observe that this is one of Thomas Pynchon's classic examples: "If they can keep you asking the wrong questions, they don't have to worry about answers." -- Thomas Pynchon http://www.goodreads.com/author/quotes/235.Thomas_Pynchon Nobody asks whether incarceration by monopoly state is viable. Nobody questions how imprisonment ignores the victim(s) of the wrongdoer and forces the victim to pay double -- the cost in life, limb and property of the misdeed, and the cost of the convicted miscreant's bed and board ("taxation"). Through "voluntary compliance", of course. Nobody inquires if there is a way in total freedom to deal with even violent evildoers (you would think those espousing "gun 'rights'" might be so inquisitive). Just a longing for "justice" and whining over how psychopaths treat their victims. Abstain from beans, my friends. It might seem a small start. But it is a start. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 7 weeks 2 days ago Web link Westernerd
    It is important, Glock, to recognize something so basic it’s easy to miss: you and I, as government (“public” ha ha) educators, at one time or another in our careers, taught students that monopolies were bad. They are inefficient, inept, and they bring about grave harm to the hoi polloi. This, of and by itself, was not incorrect as far as it went. Where we innocently but abjectly ran aground and turned the apple cart upside down was our dissemination of the meme that monopolies are a product of the marketplace. Fat cats -- greedy, lascivious for evil profits -- tend to dominate markets. It is those moneybag capitalists who are responsible for rising prices and the poor becoming poorer. A war upon poverty is a war against those fat cats. Therefore “we” (read: psychopaths grouped into abstractions called “government” – city, county, state, federal, et al.) must regulate all business to end monopolies. “We” must legislate – decide for sellers and buyers alike -- what should be produced, under what guidelines, and what should be declared legal and/or illegal. I can’t speak for you. But I’m trying to remember about when it was for me that I began to awaken, to think logically and critically. It was necessary for me to see around my confirmation bias – that monopolies cannot and will not occur in a free and open market. I came to understand that I was a tiny cog (but a major contributor) in the most dangerous and egregious monopoly ever known to human kind: the state. That a police state was a natural outcropping of my tutelage. Monopoly “justice” is never unbiased. When those psychopaths (“the state”) • Make the laws, • Enforce the laws, • Prosecute the laws, • Hire the prosecutors, • License the “defense” attorneys, • Pay the “judges”, • Build the jails, • Contract jails out to private entities, • Employ and pay the wardens, • Employ and pay the guards, • Employ and pay the parole officers, Well, that sort of monopoly “justice” is not an unbiased system. It is abject tyranny. (Thanks, Daily Bell) And so, my dear friend, you and I have choices: either become emotionally destabilized over a lifetime of wrong education -- or become free. I've decided the latter is the better choice. Sam
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 7 weeks 2 days ago Web link KenK
    “under well-established law, the police…have no special duty” to protect an individual citizen. Well. He got that one right, according to SCOTUS police have no legal, Constitutional authority or duty to protect the lives of citizens”. My, my. It is a dial 911 and die situation, and possibly by the hand of a cop? I find it interesting that there is still a valid SCOTUS precedent in the John Black Elk v. U.S. which validates a citizens legal right to use force to prevent an unlawful arrest and that any bystander has a right to assist on behalf of the victim. Good luck with that one. Even if you are innocent of the original intended crime ones resisting arrest is not going to be a pleasurable experience even if a precedent does exist. Who’s going to validate that Black Elk V. U.S. position, your attorney. Hell he probably has no idea about that one? There is something about being a cop that is mysterious and mystifying. Why? What is the psychology behind the individual who becomes a cop? What is the mental age of guys on SWAT teams? What validates their emotional state and character that permits one to be a SWAT member? How is it that "no knock warrants" can honestly be issued? Why are so many SWAT members eager for a raid and live for the raid? If every American citizen, sound of mind and law abiding were required to carry a firearm would we have the problems we now have and would we even need a police force with tanks, half-tracks mounted with .50 caliber machine guns, bayonets and etc.? I could be all muddy about this one, but I don't trust them. I would like to see greater accountability enforced on them as legislators try to force upon us new and mandatory laws.
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 7 weeks 2 days ago Web link KenK
    A simple way to reduce the work force dollar spent on law abiding citizens who need work. From my perspective, prison is prison, not a place to learn; it is a punishment for a crime committed. No. I don't accept the idea of farming these guys out as a labor force. Sounds like communist Russia to me.
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 7 weeks 2 days ago Web link KenK
    I have always had a sour taste overwhelm me when Bill Maher's name is mentioned, this is an exception when I read his position regarding the attitude of Islam. The only problem I have with it is he was not specific about Islam, he generalized, I would specify radical Islam. I have no interest in living under their rule and it seems as if Bill has no interest neither. Is it safe to say he is anti-Islam?
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 7 weeks 2 days ago Web link KenK
    This is nothing more than a dog chasing its tail: Stupid is as stupid does. I don't believe this is an uncommon event throughout history.
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 7 weeks 3 days ago Web link Westernerd
    I am so full of rage I can't stand it. Even to comment on this article would take extreme effort. Such a large part of the American population is so stupid and lazy that becomes the reason this kind of brutality is permitted.
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 7 weeks 3 days ago Blog entry Glen Allport
    Ken--Oops! sorry about those posts.