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  • rettafontana's picture
    rettafontana 5 weeks 6 days ago
    The Greater Evil
    Page Retta Fontana
    I appreciate the quotes.
  • rettafontana's picture
    rettafontana 5 weeks 6 days ago
    The Greater Evil
    Page Retta Fontana
    Thank you, Samarami.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 5 weeks 6 days ago
    Self Interest
    Page Paul Bonneau
    'I think that the statement "there is no inherent drive to virtue" may be a bit of an overstatement.' Yeah, I probably went a bit overboard with that one. In our pre-"civilized" period - millions of years of tribal existence - a lot of what we call virtue probably was selected for, certainly culturally and maybe even genetically, since it enhanced survival of those who practiced it. But as you say, it is probably a fairly weak tendency.
  • D. Saul Weiner's picture
    D. Saul Weiner 6 weeks 18 hours ago
    Self Interest
    Page Paul Bonneau
    It is a difficult and important topic to teach kids. I have struggled with it because, on the one hand, I don't want them to develop an unnecessarily dark view of the world around them and, on the other hand, I think that I must do so in order to protect them in certain respects. For example, if they do not understand the nature of our government, then they might just decide to sign up for the armed forces. In my case, that was a low risk for my daughters, but a more direct threat to them is misinformation on nutrition and vaccines, since they might otherwise make some mistakes with horrific consequences.
  • D. Saul Weiner's picture
    D. Saul Weiner 6 weeks 18 hours ago
    Self Interest
    Page Paul Bonneau
    This is an intriguing article. Some of the ways in which our society is undermining virtuous behavior can be rather subtle. For example, Austrian economists have noted that the process of currency inflation alters our time preferences in such a way as to promote short-term thinking rather than the more desirable inclination toward deferred gratification. We also have an intellectual class that promotes a view of the universe and our place in it which may undermine our spiritual development. We also have government interventions into our diet and food system which are undermining our physical health which in turn also impairs our mental/moral development. This connection was noted by Weston Price about 80 years and was subsequently confirmed. I think that the statement "there is no inherent drive to virtue" may be a bit of an overstatement. I believe that most people tend to feel regret when they are doing something wrong, independently of whether they believe that their conduct will bring about negative repercussions. So I would consider that phenomenon to be an inherent drive to virtue, though clearly it is not strong enough for most of us to act virtuously much of the time.  
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 6 weeks 19 hours ago
    The Greater Evil
    Page Retta Fontana
    Excellent article. "Eventually your special someone starts to apply gentle pressure to vote for her candidate." Not only with loved ones. I see it on gun forums all the time. They know their guy is scum, but they somehow imagine he is less scummy than the other, with no real evidence to support that. Sometimes I respond: "What if the voting rate went from its current low value, up to 100%. Would anything change? No, the world would be the same as it is now. Well, what if the voting rate went from its current low value, down to 0%? Would anything change? Yes, everything would change, because even if a government managed to form, no one would pay any attention to it, and people would have to interact voluntarily. So, why are you trying to get me to vote?" I like Mencken's take on it: "I believe that liberty is the only genuinely valuable thing that men have invented, at least in the field of government, in a thousand years. I believe that it is better to be free than to be not free, even when the former is dangerous and the latter safe. I believe that the finest qualities of man can flourish only in free air - that progress made under the shadow of the policeman's club is false progress, and of no permanent value. I believe that any man who takes the liberty of another into his keeping is bound to become a tyrant, and that any man who yields up his liberty, in however slight the measure, is bound to become a slave." ["Why Liberty?", Chicago Tribune, January 30, 1927] On the original question, I have a similar situation. Those I love are still in the matrix, although marginally it seems. For me the answer is to be patient with them. It took me forever to figure it out, and I think my son is vastly farther along than I was at his age, so the outlook is not so bad. Another quote might help: "My experience of men has neither disposed me to think worse of them, nor indisposed me to serve them; nor, in spite of failures, which I lament, of errors, which I now see and acknowledge, or, of the present state of affairs, do I despair of the future. The march of Providence is so slow, and our desires so impatient, the work of progress is so immense, and our means of aiding it so feeble, the life of humanity is so long, and that of the individual so brief, that we often see only the ebb of the advancing wave, and are thus discouraged. It is history that teaches us to hope." -- Robert E. Lee
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 6 weeks 20 hours ago
    The Greater Evil
    Page Retta Fontana
    Sam, over on the zerogov forum we had an argument about "defensive voting" (e.g., voting against ballot measures such as a tax hike). Somewhat as a devil's advocate, I took the position that it is a bit much to criticize the defensive measures an individual takes against aggression. Even if the cost is a tiny increment of "legitimacy" granted to the ruling thugs, by participating, it is justifiable for a potential victim to avoid his victimhood with even such an ineffectual tool as a vote. If voting is meaningless, it doesn't much matter if you do it or not. Of course if one does so, it should be done without any blinders on. I'm still not sure my position is the correct one, or even if the argument matters at all (how many angels can dance on the head of a pin).
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 6 weeks 20 hours ago Web link KenK
    I have never understood the snobs who turn up their nose at McDonald's & the people that eat there. McD's are usually conveniently located, have inexpensive food, free Wi-Fi, free drink refills, clean restrooms, and often a play area for the small ones to blow off steam as well. But "the food" you say? McD's food offerings are no worse that what people eat at home or anywhere else they go, just less expensive. McD's is an "evil multi nat corporation"? So who isn't any more? Ronald McDonald is stupid? Okay you got me on that one, so ignore the bastard. All these objections are just status signaling from dopes that don't know any better, and fuck them any way.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 6 weeks 1 day ago
    Conceived in Tyranny
    Web link Westernerd
    If one is truly anarchist, s/he will indeed be an "uncommon (wo)man" Here's a link to a work by the late Delmar England: https://commonsensical.liberty.me/mind-and-matters-the-world-in-a-mirror... It's a long, difficult read. Difficult because England slings mud all over your idols, and you're not going to like that very much. But as a libertarian writer, he was indeed uncommon. He challenge us to examine "epistemology" -- how any of us come to know what we know. To understand the mind, how it works, how imbedded "beliefs" will effect the outcomes of my thinking. When I find myself whining and moaning about my "rights" being trampled, it is important for me to own why and how I got myself into this position. Much more. Once I get started with it I cannot put it down. Sam
  • Darkcrusade's picture
    Darkcrusade 6 weeks 2 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Kenk , Right you are! http://www.coinflation.com/ Lincoln Copper Cent 1909-1982 Cent (95% copper) * $0.01 $0.0137817 137.81% Jefferson Nickel 1946-2014 Nickel $0.05 $0.0277938 55.58% Lincoln Zinc Cent 1982-2014 Cent (97.5% zinc) * $0.01 $0.0051587 51.58% * The U.S. Mint issued both compositions in 1982; they can be differentiated by weight (3.11 g copper, 2.5 g zinc). The 1943 steel cent is not included in the table above. Also, a tin alloy is used in one cent pieces from 1864 until 1962, but that value isn't significant enough to calculate. It cost 1.7 cents to make a penny this year(2014), and 8 cents to make a nickel. The loss on the production is added unto the "debt." http://www.usdebtclock.org/
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 6 weeks 3 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    @Dark Crusade Are you sure? U.S. treasury pennies aren't pure copper any more for just that reason.
  • Darkcrusade's picture
    Darkcrusade 6 weeks 3 days ago
    Conceived in Tyranny
    Web link Westernerd
    Thanks Sam, The truth is usually hidden in plain sight within the contents of the documents. When you come upon the verbiage of the "consent of the governed" it is indicative that we volunteer to Place ourselves into that inferior status. Better to claim your rightfull place as the king without subjects. Sure most have been indoctrinated since youth to consent and if that failed you are coerced or blackmailed and or threatened into the tar baby. Freedom has a price that few are willing to pay. More are finding the escape hatch written into their (secret) code and are emancipated from that beast. Others cannot give up the benefits and sell out for a bowl of porridge. An Uncommon Man by Dean Alfange I do not choose to be a common man. It is my right to be uncommon, if I can. I seek opportunity, not security. I do not wish to be a kept citizen, humbled and dulled by having the state look after me. I want to take the calculated risk; to dream and to build, to fail and to succeed. I refuse to barter incentive for a dole. I prefer the challenges of life to the guaranteed existence; the thrill of fulfillment to the stale clam of utopia. I will not trade freedom for beneficence nor my dignity for a handout. I will never cower before any master nor bend to any threat. It is my hertiage to stand erect, proud, and unafraid; to think and act for myself, enjoy the benefits of my creations and face the world boldly and say: This I have done.
  • Darkcrusade's picture
    Darkcrusade 6 weeks 3 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Ha! He overpaid! The copper in the pennies is worth more than the face value. Kenk, what is an authority? Gubbermint is the biggest counterfeiters of all. A paper envelope dropped in the mail does not a summons make. Although many volunteer to take on the burden and respond therby curing All defects.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 6 weeks 6 days ago Blog entry Jim Davies
    The death of Muhammad Ali reminds me of another example that ought to have been included in this Blog (not that there was room): the case of the government soldier.   He is conditioned to believe (in boot camp, if not before) that it is a good and honorable thing to give (or at least to risk) his life for his country; to kill upon command. What utter, tragic rubbish.   Cassius Clay was one of those who saw that nonsense for what it was.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 7 weeks 1 day ago
    The Greater Evil
    Page Retta Fontana
    Retta, you've brought up some excellent points in the realm of achieving, as our old and late friend, Harry Browne labeled it, "Freedom in an Unfree World". And also in dealing with those I love dearly, but who seem to eschew freedom with an eerie martyrdom. If I didn't know better, I'd want to grasp 'em by the seat of their britches and the scruffs of their necks and rub their noses in liberty. Sometimes it's easy to forget that I did not arrive upon this pale blue dot with an anarchist spoon in my mouth. It was a slow process with me. And I'm at an age where I must consciously resist set-in-my-ways thinking. Just because I'm octogenarian does not mean I can't learn new stuff as I trudge along. To repeat a story, I have 7 children (6 of 'em now over 50) and lots of grandchildren (26th due in August). Two of my boys and their families were ardent Ron Paul supporters in the last two bread-and-circus events -- heavily invested in his "run for grand wizard". I did lots of grandpa duty during those years, met Dr and Mrs Paul a number of times (and some of their children), came to respect them considerably. I would not hesitate to refer any of my friends or daughters or daughters-in-law to him (he's an OBGYN). His medical "practice" (whatever that's supposed to mean) was and is not far from my old neighborhood in South Central Texas. But I would not vote -- for him, or for anybody else. "...Voting is so trivial as to actually be a meaningless exercise and ritual, like making the sign of the cross when you enter a church. But sooner or later, it will come down to drawing a line..." The fecundity of your statement strikes the root of the dilemma. I like the way Mark, our friend and STR contributor, once phrased it: Working within the system means to become a part of the system. When you go into the voting booth, the only meaningful significance that your action will have is to show that one more person supports the state. ~Mark Davis From "Be Free", by Mark Davis July 10, 2005. http://www.strike-the-root.com/52/davis_m/davis1.html One evening the whole crew showed up at my place (the 26th above referenced grandchild will be their 10th!) laden with Ron Paul posters and signs, beseeching me to allow them to be installed on my property. I gently turned them down. I explained (non-argumentatively as possible) that displaying political signs would go against everything in which I believe and try to stand for. "...I don’t have much, but I have my integrity, and what I endorse matters to me. I cannot in good conscience participate in the deadly game of politics --can you? It’s a theater of the absurd, except it’s not funny. I won’t co-sign the promotion of theft, murder and all brands of tyranny, whether it actually counts for anything or not. I won’t pretend that the electoral process has validity..." Sez it all. Good work, Retta! Sam
  • Log from Blammo's picture
    Log from Blammo 7 weeks 3 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    The pseudoscience of phrenology once again rears its ugly, bumpy head.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 7 weeks 3 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Our authorities are on to that trick. Fines are payable (here in MI) by cash or certified check (exact amount) ONLY. Write something nasty, rude, or obscene on the ticket or check or other submitted form and you'll be summoned and fined for that too. Found that out the hard way.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 7 weeks 4 days ago
    A Dictatrix at Work
    Blog entry Jim Davies
    You have the right priority, Sam: terminate the system as fast as feasible, then the absurdities and hardships foisted upon us by its particular members will be no more than a bad memory.   The fastest way (in fact, the only way) I have so far seen for doing that is the exponential growth associated with the Freedom Academy, which will result in everyone repudiating government and so declining to work for it. It will then cease to exist. This matters above all else.   It necessarily takes a while, though; lightning fast compared to any other way yet tried, but still, several more years. In that meantime, there is (would you agree?) some merit in limiting the carnage caused by governments. It's desirable for example to influence the sheeple to pick a Führer who favors peace rather than war. War is so pervasive in its destructive power that it's not really true that it "will not affect me or those I love." Quite possibly, it might even wipe out the race.   Hence, at this moment, the need to steer public opinion away, if possible, from the Dictatrix from Chappaqua; additionally, I find it quite a lot of fun. I certainly don't favor the Libertarians for Trump idea, but I do reckon he might buy a little more time for us to get the main job done as above.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 7 weeks 4 days ago
    A Dictatrix at Work
    Blog entry Jim Davies
    "...You don't vote, I trust, but that need not stop us encouraging those who do from making sure that this megalomaniac never again crosses the White House threshold except as a visitor under close guard..." You're right, Jim. I don't vote. Not only do I not vote, but I have no dog in the fight. Nor have I plans to enter a dog in the fight. If the hoi polloi want to vote for Ms Clinton for grand wizard of the klan, that's fine with me. It will not affect me or those I love. Much. Or much more, I should amend, than a Paul, or a Trump. A Paul, or a Trump, might -- might -- delay the agony that is certain to preclude both your and my hope and goal: that coercive, warring, monopoly rulership will end in our lifetimes. I believe that it will indeed end -- hopefully within the time that I can remain cognizant and aware. But I fear it will end with much suffering on the part of the mass majority who believe in central political authority. For one thing, in order for central political authority to end, an entirely new, revised economic mindset on the part of each human being on the planet will need to be incorporated. "Bitcoin" and the like might play a roll. I don't know how that will play out, because a huge plurality have no access to personal computers and wouldn't know how to deal in cyber currency if they did. I well remember how heart-broken I was the day the brainless masses voted in droves for Lyndon Johnson (and against my hero of the hour, Barry Goldwater). Had Goldwater "won", the ugliness that was Viet Nam very well might could have been avoided. I don't know. But Barry would not have affected the proclivity for government wars. And what I do know is that I never again registered with civil government employees or "voted" in any of their bread-and-circus events. Karl Hess led me to Harry Browne, who led me here.
  • Brian Mast's picture
    Brian Mast 7 weeks 6 days ago
    Into the Wild
    Page Retta Fontana
    I had never read the book or saw the movie, so I Startpaged the topic and quickly learned about the reason for Chris's demise. I immediately lost interest because as luck would have it; I had just a few days earlier discovered a low cost way to travel and to experience different lifestyles. Workaway joins home and small business owners with people who want to travel within the U.S. or worldwide. The traveler works up to 25 hours per week for a place to live and meals, which allows the traveler to learn new skills and plenty of time to go sightseeing or something. I myself want to learn about raising hair sheep and beef cows, building an in-the-ground greenhouse, growing and marketing produce to local high end restaurants, and a great many other things so that later I lease pasture land and become self-employed profitably. I believe that being a volunteer or a host at Workaway is a much better plan than traveling to Alaska alone and living in a bus. Perhaps some of you anarchist businessmen living in New Hampshire, Mexico, or elsewhere can use this sort of help.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 8 weeks 16 hours ago
    Into the Wild
    Page Retta Fontana
    I've read the book.  Fascinating story.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 8 weeks 21 hours ago Web link KenK
    The much bally-hooed security bot is simply a mobile security camera. Honestly tho, that's cool. But I don't wanna see these things armed. Not even with human oversight.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 8 weeks 21 hours ago
    Into the Wild
    Page Retta Fontana
    One of my favorite films too.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 8 weeks 2 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    The New York police state recently made machetes illegal.  High taxes, total corruption, severe over regulation,  lackluster economic opportunites, and a greasy Mussolini wannabe governor all  make me conclude: fuck that place.
  • D. Saul Weiner's picture
    D. Saul Weiner 8 weeks 3 days ago Page Paul Bonneau
    Not everyone is adversely affected by vaccines. But lots of people are being adversely affected by them nowadays, now that Congress has eliminated liability for manufacturers, doctors, and those ordering them, and the vaccine schedule subsequently exploded (in the 1990s and beyond). The current generation of kids is much sicker than prior ones, with high rates of autism, ADHD, allergies, seizures, learning disabilities, and autoimmune disease. Military members have been hard-hit by vaccines (think Gulf War syndrome) and adults are also being harmed. The flu shot has generated the most claims in vaccine court and sometimes it causes death, paralysis. It is a good idea to leave the government schools, for a variety of reasons, but the vaccine mafia is making it extremely difficult to escape its dictates nowadays. In California, kids can no longer even go to PRIVATE schools if they have not taken the shots "recommended" by the CDC. Day care workers must do likewise in CA. Hospital workers are losing their jobs if they refuse their annual flu shots (there is a provision in Obamacare whereby hospitals lose Medicare funding if they don't maintain sufficiently high flu "compliance" rates). There is a bill in Congress now to bring CA-type laws to the whole country. University students are now being required to take various shots. That is why we are hearing about mumps outbreaks on campuses early on in the school year. Mothers giving birth in hospitals who refuse the Hep B shot for their newborn are being threatened that the hospital will bring in CPS; this happens on a regular basis. Mind you that Hep B is a condition that only the sexually active and drug users are susceptible to (and children of mothers who have the virus, which can be tested for). The U.S. is one of the only countries in the world that does this. So the bottom line is, if we do not stand up against this tyranny, we can all look forward to being vaccinated from womb to tomb.  
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 8 weeks 4 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Well, that IS the function of government. The real question is whether it is good or not.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 8 weeks 4 days ago Page Paul Bonneau
    I do not subscribe to the government vaccine program, but I never experienced anything adverse about it. I suspect the people getting grief over it are those using half measures. That is, they protect their kids from vaccines, but still send them to the government indoctrination centers. The schools do not belong to "the people" (whatever that means); they belong to the government. People should not be surprised at what happens there, nor does it make sense to complain about it. Just leave; that is the answer.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 8 weeks 4 days ago Page Paul Bonneau
    Douglas, I watched that video. What I didn't see was effective behavior. If anything, this sort of thing creates more Trump supporters. Even provocateurs must understand this can't work. Who would take them seriously? But yeah, definitely assholes.
  • D. Saul Weiner's picture
    D. Saul Weiner 8 weeks 4 days ago Page Paul Bonneau
    Social disapproval is, like practically everything, a double-edged sword. In earlier periods, it served the cause of liberty in certain instances, for example there was a period of time when taking welfare from the government was frowned upon and avoided, when possible. Likewise, having children out of wedlock was not approved of. Clearly, those days are gone. The most common and extreme form of social disapproval in vogue these days is directed at those who do not subscribe to the government vaccine program. Besides for the blatant nastiness unleashed toward these folks, this form of disapproval or shaming has gotten to the point that family members will sever relationships with one another, doctors will not accept their children in their practices,  and, politically, governments have become more brazen in removing exemptions to their ever-increasing mandates. While some libertarians might view this latter form of disapproval as an expression of civil society "policing its own", that would be a misreading of the situation.  It is not a grassroots phenomenon by any means. It has been manufactured by state propaganda, a compliant media, and corrupt research performed and sanctioned by government.  
  • Douglas Herman's picture
    Douglas Herman 9 weeks 16 hours ago Page Paul Bonneau
    BTW, Check out thses assholes over at Infowars. Talk about clueless SJWs ANGRY MOB SURROUNDS TRUMP SUPPORTER New Jersey Trump protesters spew the typical "racist," "sexist" talking points  SPECIAL REPORTS 2230 Comments
  • Douglas Herman's picture
    Douglas Herman 9 weeks 16 hours ago Page Paul Bonneau
    Paul- If a SJW is under, say, 22-25, he  or she is probably suffering from a lack of important life experiences, remaining a narrowminded adolescent, victim of PC classrooms and part or the peer-pressured Selfie Generation.   Obviously MOST of these young SJWs have NEVER read any Thoreau, otherwise they wouldn't be such douches, nitwits and pampered pricks. White AND Black.   A lot of the SJWs caught on YouTube or Infowars street cams are acting out for their posses. And alas, some of them are just paid agents provocateurs. JMHO
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 9 weeks 19 hours ago Page Paul Bonneau
    It's not just assholery Paul, although they are assholes, but a part of a political scheme. Obama and Sen. Reid broadside against the NFL's Washington Redskins today shows how the SJW schtick works. Indians are a reliable Dem constituency and the Obama model is to get these groups all hopped up on SJW memes prior to the November election. Assholes focusing on the big plan.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 9 weeks 1 day ago Web link Westernerd
    The nascent Islamic state in central Europe is emerging. If a state is an organized group that asserts the sole right to use violence to compel others, then the Austrian government now has a rival. The Austrian Islamist group makes this claim as well, along with the means and the will to act on that claim. Like the IRA in Ireland, the Basques in NW Spain, the Islamists of Austria are forming and running a shadow state inside Austria. This is how it begins.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 9 weeks 1 day ago Web link A. Magnus
    This comment will stray away from homelessness, homeless camps and Ken's original comment; but will identify freedom and liberty. There might always be individuals (no matter how any of us fantasize how "we" might come up with a "free society"), people who will shun what we generally define as "responsibility". They will trespass, steal, murder, and do all kinds of evil deeds. But most of us won't most of the time. Kent posted some videos on his blog a couple years back that illustrates my point, and which have prompted me to think as I bike along each day through the city (and back when I was actively trucking -- hours on end): about freedom, liberty, and "authority". Two of the entries were videos about traffic in the London metro, and experiments those presumably in charge of things made in removing all traffic controls from very congested intersections: 1) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lBcz-Y8lqOg&feature=youtu.be 2) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vi0meiActlU Keep in mind those who produced the videos were NOT advocating the ending of political authority. I'm sure that would be unthinkable to them. They were, in fact, addressing the "global warming" issue. Here's another: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hFOo3e0nxSI I've misfiled the one on which the guy who made the video was making dumb comments pertaining to his opinion that all this freedom was "absolutely insane", and constantly commented about "almost an accident" (that did not happen). Freedom is a fearsome meditation -- for many. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 9 weeks 1 day ago Web link A. Magnus
    I realized after I posted that it was somewhat out of line. "Nesters" have been around forever. And, "homesteaders" have been considered homeless folk (until they get their tater seeds in the ground -- and also comply with the white man's rules for satisfying the laws outlining homestead "rights"). Lots of range wars and cowboy and wagon train movies about homesteaders and nesters and "free-rangers", etc etc etc. A major barrier in the mental wrap-around is in the fact none of us has ever experienced total liberty and freedom. I've dreamed about it, tried to "theorize" it, but have never experienced it. I suspect that may also fit you. So, it seems to be generally accepted that whoever of the psychopaths have been victorious conquerors in their wars can then claim "jurisdiction" over a given piece of real estate (such as "North America" and/or "South America" -- and now, of course, all their various political divisions, boundaries and borders as we know them -- virtually all with histories of wars that have been decorated with various sacred names). Which then gives them the "right" to determine exactly who owns what. All "jurisdiction" proceeds from a loaded firearm. We can argue about "might-makes-right" 'till we're red in the face; but we can't alter history. Hopefully we will play a major part in changing it. Peacefully. With all central political "authority" finally scuttled. If you pay tribute ("tax") to somebody(s), you can't claim 100% ownership. And, although I agree with Mr. Davies that there will come a time (hopefully within my lifetime) when governments and states and the psychopathic groups of individuals who make them up will implode and disappear, I cannot accurately outline to you how real property will be divided up equitably. And, even then, I'm sure there will be "homeless" folks. Plenty of subject matter for topics. Sam
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 9 weeks 2 days ago Web link A. Magnus
    Yes there would Sam, it would only be a question of where these "jungles" would be located. If there were no Washington state or Seattle government entities, these homeless types would get rousted hard & have their possessions and shelters burnt by Pinkerton/Blackwater-type private security in the pay of the highway's owners. Instead they'll be nudged out by NGO social service contractors and the police. The political class wants to virtue signal how good they are and the NGO contractors are more than happy to take their money. This has all happend before by the way, too.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 9 weeks 2 days ago Page floppytilleyhat
    David: "...Individually, they would never think to steal what's mine..." Correct. This entire interchange rests upon the debate between collectivism and individualism. Renunciate, I say. So does Jack Perry. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 9 weeks 2 days ago Web link A. Magnus
    There would be no such thing as "homeless camps" if there were no such thing as government ("public" ha ha) property. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 9 weeks 2 days ago
    Rich: A State of Mind
    Page Paul Hein
    I'm the wealthiest man in town. Partly because my wealth cannot be measured in fiat. Or "bitcoin". Or gold, for that matter. Although I'd trust gold sooner than any of the others -- simply due to my "faith" that most would recognize its value and swap me for sustenance, marbles or chalk for it. Or silver. All media of exchange require faith -- or superstition. An ongoing belief that those possessing sustenance I value will be willing to swap for specie or barter. That will be true even after all lunatics gathered under the brainless abstraction called "state" have been dissipated. Just because one is anarchist does not necessitate s/he refrain from believing some things s/he does not fully understand. Healthier than any other 81 year-old with whom I'm acquainted, I've been car-free since 2008. I have two top-of-the-line bikes, each set up for different purposes: one for pulling (I have 3 different cargo trailers); one for over-the-road transport. These are pedaling bikes -- not motorcycles. With merely the expense I circumvent for psychopath-mandated insurance, I can rent autos or aircraft several times per year. That rarely happens. I've developed a mindset and a lifestyle that gets me where I wish to go, when I wish to go there. That includes crossing fictitious lines in the sand ("borders") without bothering with the white man's "passports", "visas", et al. If I want to move to one of the parts of the earth they're calling "Mexico", "Chili" or "Costa Rico" I'll do so. But not because folks there are more "free" than I am. However, since my 26th grandchild and 6th great-grandchild are due this summer, I think I'll stay here near my family. And be free. Here. Now. Where I'm "at". Nice article, Paul. Sam
  • A. Magnus's picture
    A. Magnus 9 weeks 2 days ago Web link A. Magnus
    "It was for the best" in 1940s Germany too, and just as many suburban vermin were happy to look the other way while the weakest people in their society were 'put in their place.'    Considering how you didn't mention filing a police report about your alleged clothes iron incident, it's obvious you don't know who actually did it. All you have to prove your point is innuendo. However since demonizing the weak seems to be a part of your agenda, it is to be expected. 
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 9 weeks 2 days ago
    Rich: A State of Mind
    Page Paul Hein
    This seems to call into question Bitcoin and other such currencies, because all they are is electrons in one place rather than another, something pretty ephemeral. It also seems to call into question any bank-issued scrip, even a bank that was not fractional reserve. Banks can go broke for other reasons. Money is a great invention, but being a device invented and implemented by humans, it is not ever going to be perfect. There are just better and worse candidates for money. One naturally prefers a kind that does not have the side effect of enriching scum.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 9 weeks 2 days ago Page floppytilleyhat
    It's all well and good to have an aim or desire to shrink government; but if you accept more than was stolen from you, then you are just another parasite, and an accomplice in the robbing of others. That ain't NAP. "I object that you are stealing from people; but if you want to give me some of the loot, I'll take all you are willing to shovel out." The latter kinda calls into question the initial objection, doesn't it?
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 9 weeks 2 days ago Web link A. Magnus
    Yeah, but they tend to wander out onto the highway a lot, and so, creepy headline notwithstanding, it's probably for the best. They often get high, drunk, or lost in their own delusional notions and throw things at passing cars too. Had a clothes iron bust the window on my truck on the I-5 in Renton one time.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 9 weeks 2 days ago Page floppytilleyhat
    All these points are true, but irrelevant. It is a simple matter of defining theft. If the money is yielded involuntarily, it is theft (extortion, to be precise). If some other amount is given voluntarily, it is not. It doesn't matter what a given victim's view of legitimacy or anything else is. If a person puts out his hand and says he needs money for an operation for his mother, and you put a $50 bill in it, then he pulls out a gun and tells you to just hand your wallet over, you have suffered a theft. Your initial willing handing over of $50 does not negate that claim.
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 9 weeks 3 days ago Page floppytilleyhat
    Jim nails it: "Incidentally my reason for agreeing that it's morally okay to accept proffered government handouts is simple: to a very minor degree, it helps reduce the resources government has, and therefore marginally curtails its ability to wreak further mayhem and advances the day of its collapse. "Accepting" them, however, by no means implies that it's morally okay to call for more, or for a continuation of the offer. Thus for example one can in good conscience use a government road, while calling loudly for its road monopoly to end."
  • floppytilleyhat's picture
    floppytilleyhat 9 weeks 3 days ago Page floppytilleyhat
    "I have some problems with this. First, is any statist given the ability to specify how much should "properly" be extorted from people? If he thinks 10% of his income is OK, and they take 50%, then the extra 40% is yielded unwillingly, and it is still theft. I don't think you can plausibly say only anarchists can suffer from theft."   This reminds me of a joke: A man said to a woman, "Would you have sex with me for one hundred million dollars?"   "Of course!", the woman exclaimed.   The man then asked, "Would you have sex with me for fifty dollars?"   "What do you think I am, a whore?", she huffed.   "My dear, we've already established that. Now we're just negotiating a price."   Anyway, I get your point, but I think you give non-ancaps too much credit. Take the case of minarchists. How many of them regard government over their prescribed limit as criminal? You may hear them use words like "excessive," "confiscatory," "predatory," or perhaps even "criminal." But how often do they mean it in the same sense they apply to a street thug?   They use hyperbolic language to object because they're paying for more than they want. But they see the state as a necessity. They believe that they truly owe some portion of their money to it. And because of its necessity, they believe that the state properly sets the amount owed. They may disagree with how much is spent, or how big the apparatus is, but they don't think of taxation itself as criminal. Not really.   In fact, I would argue that someone who sees the state as necessary must see it as legitimate, and that the necessity of the state implies that the rate of taxation is properly set by it.   -Dave
  • floppytilleyhat's picture
    floppytilleyhat 9 weeks 3 days ago Page floppytilleyhat
    "Second, setting reification aside: it's one thing for the "rightful owner" to decide what dispensation might be of his own "property" -- but by doing so (docile, "voluntary compliance"), is s/he not also contributing to the harmful endorsement of theft of my property -- and everybody else's property?"   On the whole, I think not. It's tempting to believe that they're complicit in the stealing of my property. But really, what role do they have? Voter? Their votes are as worthless as mine (Behold: equality).   Individually, they would never think to steal what's mine. They have all sorts of things they'd like the state to spend money on. But really, how many regular citizens ever propose a raise in taxes? Not many. If they did propose it, would it be more than hot air? What specific criminal actions do they do?   The legislators ratify and publish threats styles as law, and the cops follow through on the threats. In my view, those are the people who commit criminal actions.   -Dave
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 9 weeks 3 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Heh.
  • GregL's picture
    GregL 9 weeks 3 days ago Page floppytilleyhat
    Nice article. A fresh and well stated argument.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 9 weeks 4 days ago Page floppytilleyhat
    Welcome, David, it's a pleasure to read such a brain-stretcher here.   I agree with your conclusion, and on this occasion (though not always) with Walter Block; but wonder whether the way you reach it is quite correct. You seem to base it on the assertion that "rightful owner of that property is the one who decides how it is valued and under what conditions it is justly transferred." As you later admit, that is "subjective."   Surely rather, the rightful owner of property is the one who exchanged his labor for it; and that is an entirely objective standard. Objectively, he has the right of self-ownership; even though he might foolishly and erroneously regard himself as a slave (he supposes that someone else owns his labor) he does, regardless, actually own it himself. And therefore, any property for which he exchanges it.   Accordingly, all taxation is always theft, even though a majority may have been fooled into thinking they owe their souls to the government store and, so, raise no objection. Is that not the very essence of any con trick?   Congratulations though on the brilliant insight that "... the point where he sees his taxation as intrinsically criminal is exactly the point he becomes an anarchist." Precisely; the change or conversion is one of perception, rather than one of fact and reality.   Incidentally my reason for agreeing that it's morally okay to accept proffered government handouts is simple: to a very minor degree, it helps reduce the resources government has, and therefore marginally curtails its ability to wreak further mayhem and advances the day of its collapse. "Accepting" them, however, by no means implies that it's morally okay to call for more, or for a continuation of the offer. Thus for example one can in good conscience use a government road, while calling loudly for its road monopoly to end.