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  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 8 weeks 6 days ago Blog entry Alex R. Knight III
    Alex's "7-point Plan" is quite good, as far as it goes. Its location on Everything-Voluntary doesn't seem friendly to commenters (seems one has to belong to Facebook, Google+ or Twitter, and I don't) so I'll review it briefly here.   He grades the seven suggestions in decreasing order of importance, and rightly puts first the spreading of our ideas. Unfortunately he doesn't suggest a systematic way of doing that, even though he is aware of TOLFA, the equal of which I have not yet seen. Merely to mention those ideas unsystematically is of course hopeless; the math cannot possibly work.   But all of them are sound, it's a good list, none of them will hurt and the increasing use of AltCoins will help a lot. Perhaps in some expanded version of his "Plan" Alex will detail how that increase might be promoted. It seems to me a chicken/egg problem; the supermarket won't accept Bitcoins because users are so few, and users are few because there are not many places to spend them.   Item 4 is vital, though it's not identified as such: Avoid Government Employ. Yes, as an ethical choice; but very much more. Only a complete withdrawal of labor will cause government to vanish. No word on how to cause that.   A good list, but its chief defect is in the title line: it's not a "Plan" at all. It doesn't even have the shape of a plan. It does not contain the essential components of a plan - rather like the Pugsley Plan, which I reviewed here four years ago but which Alex may have missed, as a plan it fails even to get airborne. In my STRticle What a Time to be Alive! in 2012 I spelled out the five essential components of any plan; it seems he missed that one too. They are: Define and describe the objective Identify the method to be used Specify the time scale and milestones List the resources required, and where they can be found Name the key dependencies assumed, and test for credibility   Not one of those components is stated in Alex's "7-point Plan" and, accordingly, it's not a plan. But otherwise, again, it's a useful list.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 8 weeks 6 days ago Page Paul Hein
    Alex's savage, hysterical ad-hominem slurs are beneath contempt, but I will point out that TOLFA is far from being "just" a web site. Any who visit just its home page, and are literate, can see that it is a self-driven, interactive academy for freedom; a school, a place to learn; and having learned, a resource to which to bring others.   No harm in supplementing it with good material found elsewhere, but its 18 segments suffice alone to show any genuine student the intellectual necessity of anarchism, and to spread that knowledge throughout society and so cause the withdrawal of all government labor. Hence the slogan: Nothing less will do, nothing more is needed.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 9 weeks 3 hours ago Page Paul Hein
    That it is a well-done and useful website is one thing, and for the most part I don't disagree.  But that it is just a website, one minute factor in a wide panoply of voluntaryist media -- all of which is, at this point, itself miniscule comparative to statist propaganda -- seems to be a concept his hyperinflated sense of self-importance cannot sanction.  It is not and is never likely to be the key that unlocks the door to freedom.  That, if it ever happens, will be a cumulative effect from any number of sources -- from which we are still decades if not centuries away, in any case.   But don't tell him that.  His god-complex can't withstand it.  As was previously illustrated above.
  • Thunderbolt's picture
    Thunderbolt 9 weeks 1 day ago Page Paul Hein
    As one who did languish in a cell over income tax, I appreciate the insights offered by Jim Davies. I think his analyses of the concept of freedom is convincing and useful for practical decisions. The Online Freedom Academy is priceless. Nowhere else have I found such a complete construct.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 9 weeks 1 day ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Dismiss this if you must, Sam, as a shameless commercial; but my book A Vision of Liberty ought to be on your library shelf if you are "looking beyond the state." It tries to portray what society will be like after the state has gone.   It typefont is reasonably large, and it will reach you personally inscribed by the author; which alone will make it a collectors' item in the coming decades and centuries.   BTW, did you take your eyes to the doctor?  A few years ago I had one lens replaced by a plastic insert, and it now gives clearer sight than the other, natural one.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 9 weeks 2 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Looking "beyond-the-state" is a challenge indeed. Probably one of the most enigmatic of challenges, since virtually all of us have cut our eye teeth on "statism" (as we now recognize it -- but could never have even understood the term just a few short years back). Recently I began going through the hundreds -- yea, thousands -- of various articles and books I had downloaded while I had internet at home. I "DC"'d internet at home several months ago, for several sound reasons. As I've gone through ancient files, editing (my eyesight has become quite poor, and I've been enlarging the print as I go), I've also taken to outlining certain words and terms used by so many of my libertarian guru's and friends. That gave me to recognize just how difficult it has been to divorce one's thinking 100% from early childhood state inculcation. How easy it is to think in terms of "our leaders", "our betters" (usually in jest, but still using the possessive plural pronoun "our", which tells me the writer has not totally given up collectivist thinking), "the president", et al. And the profusely used "we" word -- even among "libertarians". It's difficult to remember that I can be free. Here. Today. Where I'm "at". The first order of business is to purge my head of collectivist words and phrases. A near second is to recognize what I have power to do, and what is totally out of my control (your behavior and thinking is one of those -- although, since you're here at STR I have to presume your mind is much more pliable to new ideas than it was before you arrived). I have to relegate pesky coercers into the realm of rattlesnakes. Except, of course, the rattlesnake serves some useful purpose in the overall scheme of things. Which means that I need to be aware of defensive actions I can take at all times. I can't end the state. It's everywhere. Even vestiges linger with highly respected family, friends and libertarian guru's. The enormity of the truth is incredible.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 9 weeks 3 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    https://fee.org/articles/the-economic-fantasy-of-star-trek/    
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 9 weeks 5 days ago Page Paul Hein
    And, my dear friend, I could have anticipated you'd lump me with those "...languishing in my cell..." However, I've become a student of the art of eliminating the "cell" from my life -- without fellowshipping or complying with the beast. In fact, the art I think of as "freedom" includes the ability to sidestep and circumnavigate the beast. For now. The white man is ignorant at best, stupid on down the scale; but aware his hold is constantly at risk of slipping from his grip. His stock in trade is keeping you in the syndrome of feeling the need to change others in order for you to be(come) free. Matter of fact, I understand that the place you're probably referring to as "...the good ole US..." has currently become the largest police state anywhere on earth, in all of recorded history -- with more folks incarcerated (per thousand, or 100 thousand, or however you're estimating population) than Iraq, Iran or Communist China. In the science of rulership it's never good to incarcerate and/or murder too high a percentage of those who make up your robbery ("tax") base; so inroads must be made by those lunatics in winding down "the-drug-war", which has given rise to a large percentage of the lockups. Of course I'm old, my hide is tough from a lot of chewings over the years. The beast likes younger, more tender meat -- more easily coerced into being "...a 'citizen'" (a tame, compliant citizen at that). I've never nor will ever fit that category. A fun time to be alive. I fully plan to live to see anarchy in my time. We're already seeing a sort of model in Somalia -- but, that's shaky at best, due to tribal and other factions attempting to work within the science of rulership "to-bring-order" where there is virtually no disorder. Please refrain from attempts to be combative with those who are trying to become free -- today, now, where they're "at". Encourage 'em. Doesn't mean you shouldn't continue to conduct your "courses". But freedom will come for many who are now just starting to conceive liberty -- without my help, or yours. Sam
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 9 weeks 5 days ago Page Paul Hein
    Probably, Sam, you're one of those to whom Paul referred with "As you languish in your cell, you will have the satisfaction of knowing that you are right, and they are wrong." And it's important and admirable. Seriously.   But that's only one part or aspect of freedom. The other part removes the cell.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 9 weeks 6 days ago Page Paul Hein
    Seems I've said forever: If I choose to be free, I shall be free. Today. Here. Where I'm "at". So can you if you so choose. "...So which is it; have humans evolved in ways suited to slavery, or to liberty? Or if you prefer to say there's a creator, has that Creator made humans for servitude, or freedom?..." Makes no difference whether I "evolved" or "got created". The choice for my liberty is still mine, and no body else's. Actually, I began to learn freedom as a snot-nosed kid, enslaved ("drafted" ha ha) into the white man's army of murderers. Later I took a graduate class "in the hole". If you don't know what the white man's "hole" is, you're no doubt still struggling with liberty. The choice might be easier if a critical mass of my neighbors and friends would cease submitting confessions ("filing returns" ha ha) and voluntarily complying with psychopaths hiding under the mantle of that brainless abstraction we've come to combatively call "the state". But I can't wait for that to happen. The clock is ticking. Sam
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 10 weeks 7 hours ago Page Paul Hein
    And what did I tell you?  :-D
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 10 weeks 1 day ago Page Paul Hein
    An excellent suggestion, dhowlandjr.   The "bureaucratic bully" will keep bullying for ever - Paul's right - if he has anyone working for him, to carry out the coercion. But what if nobody will work for him? What would it take, to cause everyone to quit such work?   More, probably, than just the QuitGov site. But that's a start, it may help.  It's a free gift, use it as you wish.   One thing continues to puzzle me, though, about those who think that "America, 2017" is a permanent condition, that no solution or escape exists for you or me or anyone else to find. Why bother, in that case, thinking about freedom or discussing freedom or writing about freedom or reading about freedom, here on STR or anywhere else? Why not just go away and eat, drink and be merry, for tomorrow we die?    Well, there's a second puzzle too, closely associated: writers, readers and comment-posters about liberty usually say that freedom is the condition properly and ideally suited to human beings, that it's the right and natural condition for our species (in those words or some like them.) But if in practice freedom were unobtainable, an ideal beyond human reach for the indefinite future, that cannot be true. Thus, a contradiction exists. So which is it; have humans evolved in ways suited to slavery, or to liberty? Or if you prefer to say there's a creator, has that Creator made humans for servitude, or freedom?
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 10 weeks 2 days ago Page Paul Hein
    I wouldn't presume to speak for Paul on this, but it seems to me he's just telling it like it is, and challenging the uninitiated to think about it.  YOU come up with a "solution."  LOTS of voluntaryists are talking all the time about "solutions."  ALL of them have flaws, and all of them are multi-generational, at best.   In short, settle in.  Things are going to be as Paul describes them here for a long, long time yet to come -- no matter what you or I try to do about it.   And now I just *know* who's not going to be able to resist "rebutting" what I've just said with his sacred website.  Wait for it.....
  • dhowlandjr's picture
    dhowlandjr 10 weeks 2 days ago Page Paul Hein
    Well, which one is it for you? fugitive, prisoner or slave?This would be a good article if you thought your readers were worthy of knowing what you perceive to be the solution. Let's look for ways to exemplify our vision of moving towards something better, please.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 11 weeks 5 days ago Page Lawrence Samuels
    What a superb, Churchillian opener!   "Less respect for liberty and truth" than Hillary? - not sure about that. Marginally more, I'd have said. Consider the first paragraph of Jared.
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 12 weeks 3 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    "Find your own little Higgs boson bubble, and make the most of it." Exactly, Alex. It is extremely difficult to remain hopeful that others will seek liberty, much less enlightenment, when so many repeatedly choose security, and willful ignorance, instead. However, liberty will survive and flourish when the existing state system collapses of its own weight and the parasites die along with the host. The remnant survives because of the individuals that retain self-sufficiency, self-responsibility, a sense of family, community and brotherhood that comes voluntarily from within, not imposed by far-away authoritarians. So, the key to human survival is liberty-minded individuals networking among themselves and not going down with the ship of state. The greatest difficulty typically arises when the rats realize the ship is sinking and they begin to scavange among remnant resources forcing hard choices and conflicts of conscience as to who to save and who to let drown.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 12 weeks 3 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Fully agree, Saul. State has been inculcated almost virtually into the very air we breathe from time immemorial. Nobody -- even those who lived in the place they began calling "the usa" over 200 years ago -- has been capable of shaking "state" from his or her thinking. Not for long, they haven't. It's everywhere. Always has been. Or, has been for a long, long time -- well before my time. "Them good ole' days" were a mirage. One might lament, "...well, if 'the citizenry' had rejected government ('public' ha ha) schooling a hundred or so years ago, 'we' might be free of 'state-ingrained homeostasis' (my new medical term) today!" Not so, I'm 'feared. One of the first articles I read by my friend, Mark Davis, right here at STR, helped me "over the hump" many years ago. In it, Mark first stated a truth that should have been self-evident. But I had to hear it from him, here at STR: "...I suggest that if an individual really wants to be free then they should begin to act free themselves; that is, choose to be free..." Simple stuff. But powerful. And in the same essay Mark showed me the real reason I had abstained from voting in political elections since 1964: "...Working within the system means to become a part of the system. When you go into the voting booth, the only meaningful significance that your action will have is to show that one more person supports the state..." I knew in 1964 I did not want to be involved in "the-political-process" any more. But it took Karl Hess, Harry Browne, and a number of others' books and articles to open my eyes as to why. It seems Mark's essay tilted the glass for me, even though I had been an anarchist "...waiting to happen..." for years. So, keep up the good work. Just because I may not totally agree (yet) with everything you, or Mark, or Jim, or Alex, or mishochu -- or the many, many who seem not to be contributing essays here any more -- does not mean your work is not effective. It merely means the fire has yet to be ignited. A remnant is awaiting your message. Sam
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 12 weeks 4 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Excellent, Saul, and because they come from you, an "expert", the suggestions about health care in a free society will carry all the more weight. Then, it's cumulative. A ZGS would deliver better A, better B, better C and so on; and when they see them all add up they begin to ask Yes, maybe, but how could we possibly get all this?   The answer is ready.    
  • D. Saul Weiner's picture
    D. Saul Weiner 12 weeks 5 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    "How can any one possibly know whether he "wants to live in a free society" until he has some fair understanding of what a free society will be like? Robert Higgs's assertion may be quite true, but nobody can "want" something until he knows that it exists, or could exist, and roughly what it's like."  That really is the question now, isn't it? In my own work, I try to stimulate the "demand for freedom" by highlighting ways in which our medical system is so inferior to what we could reasonably expect it to be in a free society. Yet I find that there is a lot of complacency on this topic. People have an attachment to our system which does not seem warranted to me. Now I may not be the world's best salesman or promoter (scratch that, I most emphatically am not). But nonetheless this is most assuredly a tough nut to crack.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 12 weeks 6 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Robert Higgs' well-crafted article in EVC is so blatantly false that I suspect he wrote it so as to shake libertarians awake, to stimulate rebuttals. If so, he will have been sorely disappointed by the pathetic response above, here on "Strike the Root." Today I tried to repair the damage in the Zero Government Blog, subtitled Half Full. Santé!
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 13 weeks 1 day ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Hi again, Sam -- thanks for your thanks.  :-)     I have that LVM book here at home in hard copy.  I need to re-read it sometime soon.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 13 weeks 2 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Thanks, Alex, for the contribution of your thoughts in this essay. It's easy to lose sight of the freedom each of us "rugged individualists" (thanks, Ludwig von Mises) at STR have achieved -- naysayers be damned. Not a whole lot most of us can do for the superstition that besets almost all of our neighbors and friends -- even family members -- that often seems to keep the beast at our doorsteps. Was recently reading an old (1972) von Mises piece: "What restricts the individual’s freedom is not other people’s violence or threat of violence, but the physiological structure of his body and the inescapable nature-given scarcity of the factors of production. It is obvious that man’s discretion to shape his fate can never trespass the limits drawn by what are called the laws of nature. "To establish these facts does not amount to a justification of the individual’s freedom from the point of view of any absolute standards or metaphysical notions. It does not express any judgment on the fashionable doctrines of the advocates of totalitarianism, whether “right” or “left.” It does not deal with their assertion that the masses are too stupid and ignorant to know what would serve best their “true” needs and interests and need of a guardian, the government, lest they hurt themselves. Neither does it enter into a scrutiny of the statements that there are supermen available for the office of such guardianship". ~Ludwig von Mises, 1972, “The Anticapitalistic Mentality” (pdf file) Von Mises was perhaps not "anarchist" as most of us today view anarchy; but he was definitely not "statist". He opened the door to much, much liberty and freedom of thought. One of the things my absence from internet service at home has accomplished in my months of rehab has been my review of hundreds -- yea, thousands -- of files, comments, and entire books I had downloaded over a period of years; and never taken the time to peruse thoroughly. This was merely one of many I've taken this opportunity to study in depth. Seems every day for years I would paste and copy into "word" and "pdf" files essays and books and threads of comments to essays; always with the intention of coming back and reading more comprehensively. Then, dozens of downloads later, would forget I had even put them into "read later" files and folders. Included are also many old essays by my would-be (but jocular, for the most part) antagonist and friend, Mr. Davies.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 13 weeks 2 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    "...you are beyond the reach of reason..." Times like this, Jim, I'm grateful for my "belly-button theory". Sam
  • ReverendDraco's picture
    ReverendDraco 13 weeks 2 days ago Web link Mike Powers
    But wait - there's more! http://responsibletechnology.org/gmo-education/health-risks/
  • D. Saul Weiner's picture
    D. Saul Weiner 13 weeks 3 days ago Web link Mike Powers
    "American's have been eating GMO foods for decades and there is not an iota of evidence that GMOs are detrimental to health" I beg to differ. Check out this article: https://www.westonaprice.org/health-topics/modern-foods/genetically-engi... You can always count on Reason to shill for the crony food and science players.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 13 weeks 3 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Glad anyway, Sam, to see you back; and thanks for sharing the story of your misfortune. I was kidding, of course, about the necessity of "leave", and hope the time remaining to your life is long.   Since you don't agree to something which is objectively obvious (that a slave, however free he feels and rightly should be, is absolutely not free) I fear there's nothing I can do to persuade you. In this respect, you are beyond the reach of reason.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 13 weeks 4 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Thanks, mishochu, for the clear and unarguable stance. It is indeed difficult for some (particularly of "manager and controller" bent) to not naysay your and my claims to "...living free as possible..." Once, while using the rattlesnake analogy (pertaining to armed statists), I stated: "...but I am not free to walk barefefoot in the woods...". A friend, once a regular reader and commenter at STR, responded: "...but you ARE free to walk barefoot in the woods..." (another naysayer, I'm 'feard). He was merely pointing up the sad situation that, even with what seem to be iron-clad anarchists on the surface, there often appears a vestige of that "dangerous superstition" referred to by our friend, Larken Rose. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 13 weeks 4 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    "...To claim that is ridiculous and confusing. Agreed?..." Absolutely not. Why agree to a "ridiculous and confoozing need" to change others in order for me to become "free"??? How you process "freedom" in your own life is your responsibility. I suggest a reread of this: http://antislavery.eserver.org/narratives/narrativeofthelife/narrativeof... And perhaps even this: https://archive.org/details/236222899TheMostDangerousSuperstitionLarkenR... I was hospitalized as the result of an accident for 3rd degree frostbite and hypothermia last year and had to make some temporary changes in living situation. Upon return decided to scuttle internet connection -- for a number of sound reasons (sound to me). Of course I abandoned television nearly 50 years ago, and have been car-free for nearly 10 years now -- reasons of which might not appear sound to others, but I am a free (yes, free) individual. So, now use government ("public" ha ha) library compooter for web connection, and my "allotted time" is running low or I might have additional comments to your assessment of my "freedom". Sorry for the absence (without leave???). Sam
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 13 weeks 6 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    I certainly don't disagree with you.  But you see the basis for my (and Higgs's) skepticism.
  • mishochu's picture
    mishochu 13 weeks 6 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    True. I just can't wait for everyone else to catch up and start believing what I know to be true, I have time preference for living as free as possible, right now (even "where I'm `at`"). I wish those willing and able to do the proper convincing much luck.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 14 weeks 20 hours ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Another piece in this vein just published by Dr. Robert Higgs:   http://everything-voluntary.com/dont-want-live-free-society        
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 14 weeks 1 day ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Hi mishochu!  Well, understand that not only are you in a fairly limited group of people who have or can reasonably obtain that flexibility, but your ability to stay obscure and avoid direct taxes on your earnings still only gains you some greater freedom from states.  There are still plenty of other taxes you're subjected to -- including, of course, the artificially elevated costs of everything from soup to nuts as a result of governmental intervention (regulations, corporate taxation, inflation, etc.).     Then comes your physicality.  You are still not shielded from the potential actions of the police wherever you may happen to be -- whether at a governmental checkpoint (border, airport), or just out and about living life.   Only total abolition can deliver actual freedom.  Mindset, extra passports, cryptocurrency, etc. all help -- but they are not final answers, unfortunately.
  • mishochu's picture
    mishochu 14 weeks 1 day ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    May I take a stab at that Alex? I hide, and I hide well. It doesn't hurt to have more than your standard issue blue passport (pitting two, three, or more states against each other is handy when they come calling to claim ownership of some part or all of you). I didn't do this on purpose, I was an immigrant from an early age. I endeavor to earn nothing, as far as the world knows. I'm gainfully unemployed. Decentralization makes it possible.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 14 weeks 3 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Sam, first of all you went AWOL last year, and I never asked what happened. You fell ill, perhaps? You seem to have recovered, yes?  What was the story, if you'd care to tell it?   Then, I wonder if you'd like to engage in a thought experiment. Imagine that you are an antebellum slave. No doubt about it: you have no choice, but to do what Massa says, for it's that or a whipping. Escape is not an option, for those pious anti-slavery Northerners will catch and send you right back.   So in real reality, you are truly not free. Agreed so far?   Then you hear a visitor (named Rummy Bardroth, perhaps) speak about liberty, as a result of which you come to a Damascus Road epiphany: you realize that by your natural human right, you truly are free and self-owning, and that all those who deny you freedom in practice are usurpers and liars. This discovery has enormous good effect on your self-respect and -esteem, and makes you almost a happy man. You still have to say Yes Massa, but now you can do it with tongue in cheek, treating him like "rattlesnakes -- gingerly, but not fearfully." I don't wish to belittle at all the radical change this realization brings about in you.   But are you really free in practice? Of course you are not. To claim that is ridiculous and confusing. Agreed?
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 14 weeks 3 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    You and I have had the unique opportunity of hearing that same lament. Only in those days, it was "...given the realities that sobriety sucks!..." Not a lot I can do about "...state aggression..." (although, I have changed my mindset to never state it that way. "States" don't exist. People do. And it's people who "aggress"). I look at that phenomenon with an eye towards the basic economic principle we all know: supply vs demand. As long as there is a demand for "state", there will be a supply. An eager supply, sad to say. And that's why you and I and Mark and Jim and countless others write. And Jim has even created an exhaustive "program" to attempt to interfere with that demand. I salute him for that effort. We'd all like to lower the demand for "state", if at all possible. And, I think that's being done. Slowly, of course, but surely -- and in my lifetime. For example, the "Ron Paul" movement. I wasn't a fan, and I certainly didn't register with the white man and "vote". I even had to disallow my kids from erecting political "Ron Paul" signs on my property. However; many, many quite young and educated men and women were shoved in our direction. The question I had to ask and continue to ponder: how can I help "move them over" from statism to anarchy. Quietly. Without creating disunion. Not to scare them away before they get their feet wet. Few of us were born with anarchist spoons in our mouths. Meanwhile, I must be free. I'm 82. I don't have a lot of time left to lament and worry about how that's going to come about. I've gotta live free. Today. And sustain my sanity while the world appears to be going crazy around me. I have fun treating "authority" in the same manner that I treat rattlesnakes -- gingerly, but not fearfully. They really just want me to treat them as I'd like them to treat me (just leave me alone, please). Of course, I'm old, tough and difficult to chew. It was different in 1977 -- last time I submitted a confession ("...filed a return...") to them mean snakes. But nowadays it's been many years since threatening "form letters" of intimidation have come in the government mailbox. Lots to think about, and I'm glad to see you keep on keepin' on with your essays and your comments. Sam
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 14 weeks 4 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Hi Sam!  I understand what you mean, at least in terms of mindset, but physically, how are we to "live the benefits" given the realities of State aggression?
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 14 weeks 5 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    "...And if these are the conditions under which libertarians labor, where does this leave us, realistically?..." Free. If that's your choice. Frustrated -- urgently expending energy and angst attempting to change all them "...out thar in radio-land" -- if it's not your choice. You choose. You live the benefits. Nobody can give that to you. Nobody can take it away. Sam
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 14 weeks 5 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Just in case there are any here who still subscribe to STR's raison d'etre ("The mission of STR is to advance the cause of liberty") I'll remind readers that TOLFA remains the only necessary and sufficient way to cause a free and voluntary society to come about.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 14 weeks 6 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Let's just say that, perhaps not unlike yourself, I'm highly agnostic about the prospects.  Time will tell.
  • D. Saul Weiner's picture
    D. Saul Weiner 14 weeks 6 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Reading this, I am left with the question "can mankind undergo the kind of awakening that would allow for the wholesale liberalization of society?" I think that is what it would take for people to turn their backs on statism, en masse. I pose it as a question, because I don't know if it can happen, but I wouldn't rule it out either.
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 15 weeks 5 days ago Blog entry Mark Davis
    Thanks, Alex. That Facebook site is not related. Apparently the above link doesn't work directly. Try www.retreatrealty.net Then go to Available Properties then Improved Homesteads and finally Great Prepper Homestead Property near Fontana Lake. Feel free to contact me directly for additional information.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 16 weeks 11 hours ago Blog entry Mark Davis
    Mark:  The link doesn't show anything.   As a perhaps related aside, there's this Facebook page:   https://www.facebook.com/stayalivebefree/    
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 16 weeks 3 days ago Web link strike
    Also of interest:   https://mises.org/blog/millennials-love-free-markets-dont-understand-them    
  • D. Saul Weiner's picture
    D. Saul Weiner 16 weeks 4 days ago Web link Serenity
    I should have also mentioned that the problem is not limited to dirty electricity generated at its source. It is also generated by many of the modern "devices" we use. It arises when the devices do things to interrupt the flow of electricity. So part of the solution to these problems is going to involve changes in how technology is designed or utilized. But this is unlikely to happen until there is a greater awareness of the significance of the problem.
  • D. Saul Weiner's picture
    D. Saul Weiner 16 weeks 4 days ago Web link Serenity
    My understanding is that these spikes can be mitigated. They already are, to some degree, so that the electricity does not damage the generating equipment. That said, I am far from an expert on electricity, so I can't offer more of a response here. Milham mentions Sweden during one section of the book. I left it out of my article to keep things brief, but it is a really interesting and important discussion. There has been a paradox noted by economists for several decades: mortality has been increasing during recent recessions, whereas you would expect the opposite to be the case. There is data from Sweden showing that mortality went up during recessions prior to electrification and then the pattern changed after electrification. This strengthens the case that the data that Milham compiled represents causation, not simply correlation. This also resolves the paradox that has long puzzled economists: greater production corresponds to higher exposure to dirty electricity. I would recommend reading Dr. Milham's book, which is short, accessible, and only costs a few dollars on Kindle. He has also done some pretty interesting research subsequent to the publication of his book. For example, he published a really ingenious study which implicates dirty electricity in the obesity epidemic. When you read articles about addressing the obesity crisis, this issue simply is not on anybody's radar. There are links to his recent papers on his website.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 16 weeks 4 days ago Web link Serenity
    In your article, Saul, you mention Mr Milham's finding that health has been significantly impacted by spikes in high-voltage electricity. Are such spikes unavoidable in electrical grids?   If so, it's curious that Sweden, a country in which electrification took place faster and several decades earlier than perhaps any other, has a life expectancy four years longer than the USA. It also has had socialized medicine since 1955. Correlation, of course, does not prove causation.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 16 weeks 4 days ago Web link Serenity
    Sorry - reposted as a reply.
  • D. Saul Weiner's picture
    D. Saul Weiner 16 weeks 5 days ago Web link Serenity
    "Might you agree, though, that licensure inhibits improvement in health, rather than absolutely decreasing it?" I do not think that such a statement is true in all cases. There have been numerous instances of medical practice regressing and I think that a lot of them are due to the existence of a medical cartel which was promoting its own interests at the expense of patients' health. It is difficult to draw conclusions about the relationship between life expectancies and the performance of the health care system, because there are many other factors which have a bearing, and frequently a decisive one. The primary reason for the large increase in life expectancy during the 20th century for the U.S. was the decline in mortality from infectious disease. And that decline is largely attributable to improvements in sanitation. Life expectancy is also affected by levels of prosperity, which have generally increased since 1900. I recently wrote this article which discusses life expectancy, among other things, and you may find it to be of interest. https://www.lewrockwell.com/2017/05/d-saul-weiner/diseases-of-civilization/  
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 16 weeks 5 days ago Web link Serenity
    Might you agree, though, that licensure inhibits improvement in health, rather than absolutely decreasing it?   I looked at this article about life expectancy at birth, and saw that during the 20th Century it rose by 30 years. That's not trivial, and no doubt results from giant leaps in medical science.   It also says that recently, the statistic has fallen slightly. Perhaps that results from a mounting congestion of the health-care delivery system. However it notes that some other countries show a longer life expectancy, including France, Iceland, Italy, Singapore, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland (at 83 each, vs. 79 for the US.) Most of those countries have a system even more tightly controlled by government than we do.   So, do these figures support your conclusion?  If not, there are still powerful arguments against licensure: that freedom of choice is even more important than health, and that price is a vital part of the choosing.
  • Serenity's picture
    Serenity 17 weeks 1 hour ago Web link Serenity
    That is absolutely true. Licensing is about restricting knowledge and information. Restricting the trade to a select few determined by the State and its Institutions. Elimination of liberty. not the enhancement. people die at a rate that should be alarming but for reason it is ignored. Thousands of people every year die at the hands of the medical establishment and the legal drug industry. This isn't about protection. it is about elimination of choice. Taking away people's ability to decide for themselves. Today, In fact , people are forced to use ''Licensed'' Doctors. The procedures those Licensed professionals decide upon are frequently forced on their willing victims at the point of a gun.  Rarely do these professionals cure a disease or illness. They don't make money with healthy people. They need a sick people to 'treat'. Licensing gives them the legal right to do this to people. Licensing has eliminated health by destroying choice and giving power to people who should never have it.