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  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 16 weeks 5 days ago Page Jim Davies
    Very nicely done, Jim!  (Loud applause!)  :-)  Merry Christmas!
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 16 weeks 6 days ago Page Don Stacy
    Excellent analysis, Don. Journalists generally just don't get it.   How does one locate publishers in "urgent need" of better-educated writers? ("WANTED: writer with good interviewing skills and clear grasp of Austrian economics... six figure salary awaits the successful applicant...")
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 16 weeks 6 days ago Page Douglas Young
    Thank you, Douglas, an outstanding expose'.   The outright abolition of government will quite soon fix these problems, but meanwhile do you see any solution for them in the short term?   To school children at home is good, but (a) one must still pay for the unused places and (b) many states outrageously forbid it unless permission is obtained in some degree. Further, isn't it the case that a certain curriculum must be followed in order to obtain a certificate of graduation?   Is there, do you think, any mileage in attempting to influence employers? - I'm thinking that if someone hiring school-leavers values some kind of certificate independent of the school system more than he values the government-issued parchment, the monster might be tamed. That would involve big changes in HR departments, but would be much easier with small firms than with big corporations.  And there are lot more small companies than large...   Possibly there's a business opportunity here. Graduators, Inc.
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 16 weeks 6 days ago Page Douglas Young
    Education in the 1700's was mostly handled by churches. Yale and Harvard are two who's roots are connected with church, but you will not hear then tout that part of their history. Zero tolerance comes down to an excuse for ignorance or in the least stupidity. Weekly I receive a post from a political watch groups that lists all the bills up before the State Senate and State House. When I cruze these bills I am astounded at the literal idiocy of some men and women in these positions of theoretically leadership. What all of them seem to lack is the ability to think clearly. I do not believe any give one moments recognition as to how these ignorant bills will affect the state and its citizens. One of the dilemma's, I think involved in this level of stupid conduct is the result of our education system to begin with. The State and Federal government must get out of education and leave this matter in the hands of the community.
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 16 weeks 6 days ago Web link A. Magnus
    There was once a cousin of Freud who used his work as a basis of developing a propaganda system. I believe his intent was suppose to be for the good but when evil men are around and can steal a proper idea and convert it to their illicit purposes they do. Common sense seems to dictate that a synthetic anything is not healthful. I use supplements and I hope I have found a reputable manufacture. I must confess, for as long as I have been taking them I really don't notice any particular change. This article seems to demonstrate that Uncle is doing his very best to debilitate and kill Americans How is it even remotely possible for Libertarians or Anarchists, or whoever, remain optimistic about the future when so many people are against you. Is there victory anywhere in this mess?
  • Lally Dos's picture
    Lally Dos 17 weeks 12 hours ago Web link A. Magnus
    Another worthwhile, more extensive article disseminating the vitamin bashers' various misleading maneuvers to plant in the public's mind that supplements are bad or useless is at http://www.supplements-and-health.com/vitamin-benefits.html . The public needs to understand that politics, unlike sound science, is primarily behind anti-supplement media reports and "studies"...
  • dhowlandjr's picture
    dhowlandjr 17 weeks 13 hours ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    all ur base r belong to us.
  • Commom Sense's picture
    Commom Sense 17 weeks 13 hours ago Page Don Stacy
    That pretty much sounds like Common Sense. You have to pick your battles and it appears as if many have chosen a particular course of action. It sounds like fence splitting to me, but that is neither here nor there, just a matter of natural right to select. I believe there is a potential--mind me now "potential" to work from the inside-out. Exactly how that would happen I cannot say. Exactly what Russian leaders said it I cannot recall but he said something like "America is like an apple on a tree. It will ripen until it is time to fall. Given all of the circumstances of yesterday, today and tomorrow it appears as if America must be getting rather ripe. The article and comments have been wonderful points and counter-points to an idea who's time has evolved into what next. Mark Davies seems to have a solid grasp on the situation and I appreciate Sam's perspectives and efforts. One article here suggested some alternative methods of action which I thought was exactly the correct prescription for what ails those affiliated herein. Action certainly speaks louder than words. I think the membership here should invest efforts into brain-storming ideas of action which individuals could implement.
  • dhowlandjr's picture
    dhowlandjr 17 weeks 13 hours ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    yeah, but did this data collection generate some revenue? ss
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 17 weeks 15 hours ago Page Don Stacy
    While I have to question the choice of the terms "optimistic" and "pessimistic" libertarians, I don't think it is too controversial that what Don defines as the "optimistic libertarian" view - essentially the Libertarian Party I suppose - is pretty much a dead end. Yet even that I can see a use for - not in actually accomplishing something externally, but as a probably necessary step to "enlightenment" internally. You have to try and fail at it, to move on; most of us do anyway. I don't see myself either as an "optimistic libertarian" or a "pessimistic libertarian", using Don's terms. Instead, I'm more toward acceptance. Working in the system is a joke, but giving up is not optimal either. I accept that some people will never give up their belief in the government religion for example, but I no longer require them to do so for me to be happy. I shoot for a much closer and easier target: to be left alone, to be tolerated. That is what I believe people generally *are* capable of. Why? Because they have changed as significantly in the past. There are no more religious wars any more (except for the government religion). Slavery is no longer considered a norm (except a bastardized version, "wage slavery"). And so forth...
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 17 weeks 15 hours ago Page Don Stacy
    Well, revolution (or secession, or other variations) will come whether we like it or not. It seems to be part of the human condition. I don't think the state favors any of these. The American Revolution is presented as something that happened once and for all, never to be needed again. The state thrives on conflict, true, but not on conflict uncontrolled by the state. Divide and conquer is their tactic, but the last thing they want is revolution. They want low level conflict so they can step in and "fix" things (even if they were the cause of the problem in the first place - government being a disease masquerading as its own cure). They have to justify their own existence. "Yet both only made the state more powerful." No. The coup of 1787 did that; not the revolution of 1775.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 17 weeks 16 hours ago Page Don Stacy
    All these approaches have validity, and ought to be adopted according to one's personal preferences. They all contribute to the push in the correct direction.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 17 weeks 17 hours ago Page Lawrence Samuels
    "The upshot: the people are the masters and the government is the servant." "Therefore, something is amiss." You have detected something is wrong with this picture, which is correct - but haven't decided exactly what. I believe one of your premises is questionable, that rights exist at all. See this: http://strike-the-root.com/life-without-rights Everything clears up if you abandon this notion, and look at the whole thing as being driven by self-interest and will. Those in government have discovered they can get away with certain behaviors that wouldn't be tolerated normally. Of course the whole notion of a social contract is bogus; see for example: http://mises.org/daily/5343/ It is no surprise at all that people in government routinely engage in fraud. Whether it is "legalized" or not is entirely irrelevant; in fact the notion of legalization is itself fraudulent. It is only when you accept *some* government propaganda as true, as a correct description of reality, that you have to indulge in cognitive dissonance to try to make sense of things. People in government and out of it are always motivated by self interest. Rights are only a meme, and a not very consistent or useful one at that - although it is pretty useful to the ruling class, who have relegated to themselves the job of arbitrators of rights. Will is what matters, not rights. (later) Woops, on re-reading, I see you are asking questions for others, rather than implying you believe in these fanciful things yourself. Or maybe not? It's a bit hard to see where you stand actually...
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 17 weeks 18 hours ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Your children are now "our" children. Sam
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 17 weeks 1 day ago
    Pessimism
    Page Jim Davies
    Merry Christmas, Sam.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 17 weeks 2 days ago
    Pessimism
    Page Jim Davies
    Having read and commented on Don Stacey's piece and now Jim's, I've come to a fundamental understanding: Optimists are those who agree with me. Pessimists don't. Now why did it take me 79 years to come to that understanding? Some of us are slower than others, that's why. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 17 weeks 2 days ago Page Don Stacy
    Don, I gave your piece a strong rating of 9. I've never believed in a 100% essay, and STR has no "9.5" or "9.9". Few of us or our works are perfect -- with the possible exception of thee and me. And I'm not that certain about thee, thus the "9". Seriously, I see what you were doing, and you did it artfully -- rather of a flip-flopping of the way ideals can be construed. However, I can't endorse the way you've grouped libertarians who have this or that opinion concerning that lifeless abstraction called "the state" as optimist and pessimist. For years, even prior to my admitting and accepting the label "libertarian", I felt always the outsider looking in. Still do among many (most) family, neighbors, friends and associates. I could never uncover what all the internal discomfort was about until I began to read Harry Browne, Robert Ringer, and the like. Including Jim Davies in later years. Always the optimist, however, I came to enjoy being the interloper -- and often here and on other libertarian forums I'll rib the serious-minded. Sometimes I catch flak in the process. And no, I have no illusion "the state" has any avenue of being changed from within. "It" is the naturally burgeoning end result of ancient subjugators. Politicians are factotum remnants of the conquering khans -- psychopathic geniuses in the art of obfuscation and obscuring, making it appear to those who are being robbed that they are actually being "served". Some -- precious few, I'm afraid -- can in time be convinced to "...come out of her..." as you and I have. I expect no mass exodus in my lifetime. They ain't enough Ron Paul's in Texas to create a silk purse out of a sow's ear -- and that's what you're up against trying to "...change the state from within...". For the better, that is -- perpetrators of "the-drug-war" have done an excellent job changing it for the worse, as have those who put on the "911" show. It is quite obvious that all of what we call "government" is set to implode economically. I hope to see that while I'm yet alive and cognizant. With the influx of free and open information brought about by the internet there may come a condition much like Somalia -- with perhaps enough core of freedom-loving individuals to eschew and throw off "transitional" central political entities that are certain to try to raise their ugly heads. Even in jest, I'll tend to avoid "pessimism" to describe my reason for doing or refraining from doing or thinking a thing. I wholeheartedly agree, contrary to the opinion of our friend, Mr. Davies (whom I've often razzed as a "frontal attack man"), that you and I "...became much more productive as an anarcholibertarian activist(s)..." I declared myself a sovereign state in part as an alternative to tilting at windmills. In the process of my becoming sovereign some headway has come about -- in some manner it is perhaps as a direct result of my "activism"; but in another it may be more subtle. I'll never know for sure. I've attempted to encourage and inspire those around me to see reality for what it is. Gently. Most (18 out of 25 total) of my younger grandchildren are in homeschool programs. To what extent that is my doing I do not know -- nor for the several other young families I've "preached homeschooling" to. I've not been successful in pushing whatever my rendition of "tolfa" might be in that sense; but progress has been made in my own family and environ, including cyber-friends at STR. Again, gently. I know better than to try, for instance, to convince my eldest daughter, who is about to retire from a lucrative job as vice-department head of a typically large state agency, that she should quit and "...seek honest work" (at probably not more than about 20% of what she receives now in salary). But I do not back away from expressing my understanding of monopoly government as inept, inefficient agencies of coercion. I detect a slight rolling of eyes as she blandly agrees (not to disagree) with me. This is a fun time to be alive. There is no room for pessimism. Sam
  • newjerusalemtimes's picture
    newjerusalemtimes 17 weeks 2 days ago Web link Westernerd
    Thanks for the feedback, Jim. I’ve seen and found many of your STR articles interesting, too. Well, the Embassy of Heaven grounds were considered to be, by Revere and others, to be an embassy of ecclesiastical nature, not the Nation or Christ’s Kingdom, itself. But, I suppose it was hoped that the Embassy of Heaven grounds would be considered to be a portion of the “home country, Heaven” with a boundary at the property line, like is the worldly diplomatic custom amongst hostile nation-states. Interestingly, Revere didn’t think a raid was really coming, as Marion County "officials" had been threatening to do. But I was sure it was going to happen. So, it wasn't a battle against US/FedGov, per se. Besides, FedGov and the District of Columbia didn't exist when the Peace Treaty of Paris (1783) was done, in which George III recognized the 13 former colonies to each be free and independent states, i.e., The United States Federal Government as a 14th Government didn’t exist. So, the Several States organizations are the ones claiming some sovereign right to impose a property tax on private homes or other lands, mostly through their political subdivisions or franchises (Counties). I believe the area known as Alaska still has no State-imposed property taxes in most parts of it, though. You may have implied that since the political fiction known as “Oregon” was admitted into the Union after the US Government’s formation, that it has a lower status than the original 13 States, which through their representatives created the US Government/State itself. But that doesn’t really follow, as the admitting document states that new States are on “equal footing” with the original 13 in a legal or contractual sense. But, maybe though intimidation, later States do have a lower perceived status in the so-called eyes of Washington DC controllers. I mean, the area of Nevada is about 85% BLM-controlled land. Either way, the Embassy of Heaven grounds were seized and auctioned off by the Country, for a failure to pay about $16,000 in “back taxes”, in which the County sold the property for around $120,000, and kept all of the proceeds. Regardless, much like worldly embassies and government ministries do, Heaven Passports, Heaven Driver Licenses, Vehicle Plates were produced and distributed from the grounds. And those things are still being produced. But this activity was certainly never welcomed by the State, even though the US FedGov had decided that a guy named Fox, I believe, who produced the first Church or Kingdom Passports was not involved in counterfeiting State documents. I’ve carried a Heaven Passport and DL since 1996, having renounced all former State documents, allegiances, vested PERS or other benefits, and even a State-incorporated name, all of which have remained in a status of what might approximate a Civil Death. Of course, Church ID is rarely accepted by hostile State enforcers an par as they do with State documents, even State documents from other continents, as the State is still everywhere hostile to Christ, His jurisdiction, and His Body of believers. Of course, for us, carrying our own documents is not a hostile requirement like it is for State Residents, but are rather a witnessing tools about Christ’s Kingdom and jurisdiction as a present reality. We are ambassadors and representatives of Heaven, which is, of course, a spiritual dimension that we believe can be manifested “on Earth, as it (apparently) is in Heaven”, when people voluntarily exit hostile worldly systems and enter into their non-hostile position within Christ’s Kingdom, on Earth, which can undoubtedly include things like functioning as a plumber, too. Revere might not agree that my perception of his position at the time was spot-on, but I was there, and lived with the Reveres for about 18 months throughout the period, before, during, and after the property battle and physical expulsion of us from the Embassy grounds, which was prompted by Marion County, Oregon attorneys. So, the Embassy of Heaven’s position and most associated people associated with it was rooted in Bible Scripture, in Medieval concepts about ecclesiastical jurisdiction, maybe some ideas about Natural Law, Common Law, and just plain Reason, with a logic or justification that burden of proof is on the State to first prove an obligation to pay it a tax on Church property or its functions, since the State is the moving or hostile party in its demand against Church officeholders, who are distinctly separate from State officeholders, citizens, and residents. This was the basic “reasoning” or “support” of Revere’s claim, Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction. This is still somewhat of a precedent in portions of Europe and Asia, I think, but was probably lost here in North America when most churches and those people on their church rolls became State-corporations and also US federally-regulated IRS 501 (c) 3 organizations. This was also about the time that the States started issuing Marriage Licenses, Birth Certificates, Permission To Travel Licenses, Nation-State Passports, and also imposing a horde of new direct and indirect taxes (property taxes, sales taxes, labor taxes). Of course, the Embassy/Church position is also that we pay for what we actually use. So, placing any children in a collectivized Public School (financed by extorted property taxes) while making an assertion of being excluded or exempt from property taxes that pay for those communized institutions would be hypocritical. And so, Revere had a long-standing battle, via exchanges and written correspondence with the personnel of the Marion County Tax Assessor/Collector. He informed them repeatedly over some years that the property was thereby transferred out of his personal possession, though he’d still perform his ministerial office, produce ecclesiastical tracts and other documents, hold gatherings, perform baptisms (I was baptized there), hold annual retreats, and other functions, much like all of the other “State-incorporated churches” would do and which were granted property tax “exemptions” by that political subdivision of their State. But Embassy of Heaven was not State-incorporated, i.e., Caesar is NOT Lord over the Earth or The Body of Christ, and preached as much in writing, in verbal speeches, at Expos, etc. And, this was still in the time of the Patriot Movement, Common Law Jural Society’s, and Militia Movement. Embassy was clearly identified as "anti-government, although we certainly espoused the non-hostile government of Christ's Kingdom. But it followed, logically, from a Statist point of view that the State/County would certainly crush the Embassy of Heaven ministry, as harmless and small as it was, when it became practical for them to do so, as the Branch Davidian compound at Waco was snuffed out by the US BATF/FBI jus a few years earlier over a pretext of firearm technicalities. Now, the Embassy/Revere position may sound like mere semantics, but it was one of being “excluded” from taxation rather than being “exempted” from property taxes due to the higher authority of God and Christ being the Creator of “all things” (John, 1, Col. 1, Heb. 1), and having had Christ call out His Ecclesia/The Body of Christ from the rest of His Creation for His own purposes, at His Great Commission statement, and elsewhere. So, again, the Embassy position, or the Historic Ecclesiastical position, or the Biblical position, or my position, is about authority; where it comes from, how is it exercised, who has it, how did they get it, what if any obligation is there to hostile dictators and extortion schemes, etc. Of course, for The Body of Christ, we cannot rightly serve two master, i.e. Caesar vs Christ. For us, Christ is the non-hostile King, right now, and not just in Heaven. As He said: “All authority (“polituma”, which is the same Greek word as at Romans 13) is given unto Me in Heaven AND ON EARTH earth. Go therefore, teach all peoples (not nations, which if translated as such seems a tacit endorsement of same)…” Matt. 28:18 So, if State-incorporated churchgoing Christians really believe the New Testaments writings, which I think contain a good record of Christ’s teachings that testify to a proposed fact He has “all authority” upon the Earth for those who believe, how is it that they’ll also agree with a bunch of dead guys who stated that the organization that they proposed is “the supreme law of the land”? Or, how can a pervert like Nero Caesar have any authority from God, when the Bible tells us that Christ has ALL of the legitimate political authority on Earth? Obviously Nero, George III, Bush, Obama, et al are all tyrants without any ordination from God, only fitting condemnation. And that’s a large part of the evangelizing mission of the Embassy of Heaven AND THE BODY OF CHRIST AT LARGE, to exhort people who are in spiritual Darkness and who are committing spiritual high treason against the King of Kings and the Lord of Lords. But, don’t worry, Christ doesn’t want to chop their heads off like an earthly ruler or hostile potentate undoubtedly would. And while exhorting them, we also share with them them the Good News, that Christ’s Kingdom is a present reality, as an alternative to the World Systems, for those who believe, and are willing to suffer some persecution from interloping carnal rulers and their extortion-funded employees. Like Christ said, about His Kingdom, versus Worldly Kingdoms: “The kings of the Gentiles EXERCISE lordship over them; and they that exercise authority upon them are CALLED benefactors. But it shall not be so among you…” Luke 22:25 & 26 The Disciples were pretty slow, until after the Resurrection, and Christ obviously thought that their statist minds needed to hear the obvious truth about how the State was a SHAKEDOWN and a SCAM, and how He didn’t want them to carry out their offices in His Kingdom using the same tactics of FORCE and EXTORTION while making a false claim that it is being done in their own interests. Now, Jim, you seem to believe that jurisdiction can only be derived by FORCE or by PERMISSION/CONTRACT from hostile earthly rulers, or that you are asking a really great question at the same time, as you say, “If that's so, then the Kingdom must either have negotiated its acquisition in some contract of transfer, or expelled the State's agents by force... or what?” I’m suggesting that Christ is the Supreme Authority on Earth, not only because He was none other than the pre-incarnate Creator, but also by by His superior example as a Man, at the Incarnation and throughout His Ministry. I’m suggesting that those that following Him and His teachings, by first repenting of their sins and renouncing their idolatry to Hostile World Systems, are then delegated some of His authority, not to rule over or exercise lordship on others, but to demonstrate a superior example, like Christ Himself did. I’m suggesting that that the interlopers (the State) ACQUIRED their position and authority illegitimately, by force, and some fallacy about a divine right of kings, much in the same way the early Israelites who had been enjoying a 400+ year period of theocratic anarchy, which God was quite happy with, but who then sought after an earthly king to rule over them “like the others kingdoms” around the landscape. Of course, God warned them, through Samuel the prophet, about what would happen. Of course, God let them have their way, and all of the statist calamities and heavy taxations that God warned them about did happen quite quickly, and the Congregation of Israel also soon split up, only to then joined with former enemies, to oppose their own kinsmen. I’m also suggesting that The Body of Christ ACQUIRED a somewhat recognized status and “exclusion” from property taxes by the INTERLOPERS (Caesar and the State), not by “negotiation” with the interlopers, nor by a flimsy paper contract, nor by carnal battles, but by the very act of SEPARATION from the State. That’s the secret, stupid-simple weapon that the early Church had wielded against a hostile and militaristic Roman Empire, maybe without fully comprehending it. And they took their knocks from the State, just like others did, and still do today. But the Christians then, and those today too, weren’t traumatized by the State, largely speaking. They knew the nature of the Beast. They counted the cost. Most of them were poor, but many knew they would be sacrificing positions, careers, or even their own lives if they dared to refuse to bow to Caesar and his image, and instead confess openly that “Jesus Christ is Lord” and not Caesar. I’m further suggesting that, previous to the the Edict of Milan, in 312 A.D., which “legalized” Christianity and invited “The Church” to become a State Corporation, with Caesar Constantine presiding over future Church Councils, that The Body of Christ had nearly destroyed the foundation of the Roman Empire, without violence, by NOT mingling itself with the State nor fighting its battles nor holding offices in the State. But Constantine was a saavy guy, who feigned being a Christian as he coaxed the Church into an elevated and incorporated position of the State, thereby causing most of the Church of that time and place to lose its birthright in Christ’s Kingdom. And, much like the ancient Israelites, the Church (excepting pockets or remnants of Christian groups) was quickly corrupted and began using it’s elevated State position to direct the same State Power and persecution than had been directed at them for about 250 years, at others who refused to be “Christianized”. You see, the State needed bodies for taxes and for soldiers, and the Christians weren’t going for that, for about 250 years. But, at about the same time as the State recognized The Church, The Church then recognized The State, and even mingled itself into the State. And, like I suggested, it was a grotesque thing to behold, historically and spiritually speaking. So, much like ancient Jerusalem, carnally speaking at 70 AD, and the State-incorporated churches today, spiritually and functionally speaking, both have “rode a Beast” to their own destruction. However, it seems that the English Book of Doom concept of property taxes didn’t exist in North America until more recently, so since the American States hadn’t started taxing private property/land in early Anglo-America, there was had no BASIS or precedence of taxing any church property or the property of its members, either. There is still no State “reasoning”, rationale, or basis that I’ve ever heard articulated for why or how the State authorized itself in holding the homes of people hostage with a demand of a ransom in property taxes. I mean, I think in the Texas constitution it mentions property taxes as being “donations”, as if they are voluntary. Of course, try not to volunteer, and you;ll undoubtedly see what a failure to “donate” to the State can do. So, early American churches or those on the Church Roll didn’t need to incorporate to to be excluded or exempted. And churches didn’t become State-incorporated until fairly recently, anyway. Roman Catholic parishes started to be so in the 1950s, I think. (But, anyone, feel free to chime in on some of these finer points, as I’m not a real estate or historical expert.) Also, most any State has no demand that a Church must be a State corporation, as it claims to leave establishments of Religion alone (so long as they pay and collect taxes). I’m pretty sure that most American States have no specific requirement that a Church must be a State corporation in order to be excluded or exempted from property taxation, either. But in practice, nearly all church-like properties that are not taxed are non-profit corporations, and there are State forms to “apply” for an exemption, either, as if the State was the rightful owner of the planet it might then be able to be disputed. But, of course, the Revere/Embassy of Heaven only “informed” the County of its changed status and new function, repeatedly. And it seems that nearly all hostile State organizations do expect any group to be State-incorporated before any exemption is granted, even if it is not required. So, again, it’s just a matter of the State officeholders EXERCISING lordship however they want, because they can by virtue of the fact that they feel secure in having a superior force to use, against you, and me. Interestingly, the State of Virginia organization does not allow churches to incorporate UNDER the State of Virginia, as it seems to recognize (or somebody 200 years ago did) that for a church to a be State-incorporated would be a conflict of interest for the Church, at the least. Imagine that, the Virginia State, at some point knew better than the Church itself what was good for churches. And the Virginia State was actually morse spiritually intuitive than the churchgoers of today, as nowadays, nearly all of the “churches” there apparently are often lobbying the Virginia State to allow them to become a State corporation, too, “like all of the other State-incorporated churches” around the landscape. I have heard of one Christian-family ministry that would not become a State corporation in order to be excluded or exempted from Missouri State property taxes, but did somehow achieve that goal. Sadly, I recall that it was a Christian Identity type ministry or family property, which is rooted in White racism, just like genetic and geographic Zionism is rooted in Jewish racism. But, again, the presumption of the State in most areas seems to be that to be exempt for property taxes, a religious organization (church), hospital, sports organization, Wiccan coven, Masonic Lodge, Trade Guild, and others not-for-profit groups, that they must first form as a non-profit State corporation, via Articles of Incorporation or Articles of Unincorporated Association (a rose by any other name…) under the State, usually with an expressed statement or agreement of obedience to the State, its current laws, policy, and future policy or laws (even without knowing what they might become). And the State grants these exemptions from taxes to OBEDIENT organizations within The Body of the State to further the health of the Body of the State, much as a Parasite seeks to keep its Host’s depressed health from dropping off too much, too soon. So, much in the same manner that Caesar Constantine lured a persecuted Body of Christ into serving and preserving the State and Roman Empire from collapse, the State and its churches are the same today. That cycle is not much different from that of early American revolutionary fighters against the State of their day, who carnally fought off the British Central Power over them, only to later be duped into accepting a new Central Power over them, headquartered, not in London, but instead in a new District of Columbia, created by land donations from Maryland and Virginia State organizations. Of course, I’m not arguing for “States rights”, as smaller States without any federal overlay can be just a tyrannical as other statist examples of illegitimate lordship, control, and extortion from others. But, less is more, so to speak. And if the US Government were to suddenly dissolve or be made obsolete, that would be a good thing for most people on the North American continent and around the globe. But I think Kokesh is pretty naive to run for US president, so as to abolish the US Government. I appreciate his wanting to do something that has more seeming immediacy in reducing State coercion, but also think Molyneux’s fostering the next generation with better pedagogy can help a lot, now and in the future, too. A multi-pronged effort by true liberty loving groups may finally cause the current status quo to be recognized as illegitimate and terribly destructive to the creative and brotherly human Spirit that resides within humanity. Positive change and State withdrawal or shrinkage is certainly a possibility. And that would be nice for most everybody. But, for the Body of Christ right now, a little less idolatry, or even 50% less idolatry is not a solution. But I’m not the Holy Spirit, and God leads people out of idolatry at different speeds, undoubtedly. I was never perfectly happy with the Embassy of Heaven so-called “stand” that if it looked like a church, acted like a church, and talked like a church, that it might be recognized as being excluded from property taxes like the other (State-incorporated) churches. And I recommend that any ecclesiastical group or church congregation that is now forming somehow, that it forgoes any talk of State-incorporation and also NOT seeking to get a piece of “church property” off the County tax roll, and instead just use a borrowed or rented space, without any debts or mortgages incurred, either, so as to direct or search for more Church solutions in the area of ecclesiastical Labor, outside of the purview of the State, where that’s still possible. As far as the Bible and I are concerned, The Body of Christ is the whole body of believers, apart from The Body of the State, and not just its the priests and pastors, i.e., there’s no upper class in God’s Kingdom, or in the words of the Master, the least are the greatest. So, a property tax exemption granted to only a tiny strata of the Church is hypocrisy and a sell-out. I mean, is it any wonder that State-incorporated churches don’t preach against the evils of a State-imposed property tax? No, of course not, because they get the exemption, so long as they keep their big, fat mouths shut about the State extortion scheme and other crimes. So, Revere was pretty naive to think that he might be excluded from property taxation on the property that he paid for as an individual and then began a ministry that was anti-statist to the core. Maybe I was too, to a lessor degree, was naive. But at the time I figured that if a non-State-incorporated Church property can set a precedence, then maybe others could follow, including the members own home properties that might be recorded on a Church Roll somewhere, and whose lives were not entangled in Statist citizenship and residency enrollment. Silly, I know, as the freedoms surrendered to a State are virtually never returned. And so we’ll all probably have to see the State destroy or exhaust the the Great Herd of the populous, or see the populous rebel in a violent way against the parasitic predations of the State. To me, again, now, all property is morally exempt or excluded from State taxes (not just for Christians or churches), unless one receives some benefits from a hostile State, like enrolling their children into communized Public Education Systems, which the property tax funds. But the State operators will never admit that it has an extortion racket that it just doesn’t want to give up, and will almost never allow a few to escape the taxes without something in return, as that would undoubtedly cause a great flood of people escaping the extortion racket, and then all of the County employees would have to look for honest work if they wanted to live, or else go somewhere else to find similar dishonest work where people were not free from their “services” and extortion. The time may be coming around again, though, for the current State Systems of the West to suddenly collapse in their current form, much like the Soviet Union did in 1989, or much like the US Military did in Vietnam, when it fled Saigon in 1975, seemingly defeated by a bunch of poor, yet fierce people living in caves, whose generals constantly thought they were on the brink of losing their carnal war against the US invasion and occupation. But then it happened, and most everybody was surprised by it. But, if a time like that comes for the Western World soon, and there is a political or spiritual void left to be filled, it might be filled by something just as idolatrous and tyrannical as the previous order, which will keep the statist idolatry cycle going for another time around. Maybe this is part of the speciel mind within humanity, like a fallen nature, not inherent within every individual by nature, but as a collective tendency toward statist idolatry. And maybe it is also part of God’s design that every generation deserves to learn these important lessons for itself (not necessarily the individuals), real good and hard, since IT didn’t seem to take notes from the Old Testament writings, the teaching of Christ Jesus our Lord, or even from a World History filled with examples of tyranny and human suffering committed by those operating Nation-State organizations. So, I really don’t expect all of Humanity to ever embrace Christ’s Kingdom, Voluntaryism, Freedom and Non-Aggression as a way of life that covers the Earth for all future generations. But, I do support the efforts and sentiments of those who do work towards that end. I promote all of those things, too, nonetheless. And, as a members of the Body of Christ, we have problems that are not all the same ones as those captured by or coerced into The Body of the State. I mean, sure the State property tax issue, the State direct-tax on Labor issue, and the State travel registration issue may coincide with most libertarians and generic anarchists. But, for The Body of Christ there is no earthly SOLUTION regarding these issues, at it doesn't consider selling its birthright for a mess of pottage as a fitting solution, not does it see violent overthrow as a fitting methodology. So, it’s a matter of LORDSHIP. And as long as we’re a obedient to Christ, who is our King and Creator, by keeping as SEPARATE as we know how from the Rule of Satan and all of his so-called works (the State extortion and bondage system, but not only just from the evils of the State) then the problem of how the State is treating us so badly as we are busy serving God, is God’s problem to solve. In the meanwhile, our Founding Fathers are Christ and the Apostles. We belong to ANOTHER, and his name is NOT Caesar or the STATE. Sure, we look forward to seeing evil thwarted, just like any Anti-Statists do, but our Kingdom, however small, is among us, right now, even if nobody else recognizes it. We accept that citizenship in our Kingdom comes with persecution. We have things in common with those in the Liberty Movement, like preferring autonomy from the State and carnal rulers. But we do have a ruler, a heavenly One, who gently guides us in our ways and in our conscience. And if we get too far out of His Way, there is only one radical method of correction in the earthly sphere that that is employed, without violence, by fellow believers, and only after a personal reconciliation is sought by the injured party, but then: “And if he shall neglect to hear them, tell it unto the church: but if he neglect to hear the church, let him be unto thee as an heathen man and a publican.” Matt. 18:17 So, in one sense, The Body of the State does provide The Body of Christ a valuable service, indirectly, by preparing or having ready a hostile Worldly Order to send our unruly brothers or sisters into, until they come to their spiritual senses once more. Gee, I’ve gone on way longer than I first thought that I might have. Please forgive any redundancies or obvious errors, as I want to get this out to you quickly, while it's still a bit fresh in the STR forum. And, thanks for asking, Jim. I hope I’ve responded to your inquiry in way that answers it or helps it along. I haven’t talked about this stuff at this length in a long time. A dozen or more years ago I did produce a newsletter for a while on these topics, called New Jerusalem Times, and kept a website by that name, but now l’ll just post some videos on a YouTube channel by the same name, of stuff that is a little more personal in nature. Maybe we can chat again, as I’ll watch for new articles by you here in the future. Peace be with you, Christian Livingstone
  • Thunderbolt's picture
    Thunderbolt 17 weeks 2 days ago
    The Invisible Wall
    Web link Bradley Keyes
    What an amazing essay. You have identified the absolute core of our problem.
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 17 weeks 2 days ago
    Pessimism
    Page Jim Davies
    Thunderbolt--You are pressing the idea I have always asked a year past now. What is the solution. I have the good intention of implementing one of your ideas. My other question is where are the wealthy lovers of freedom, if there are any, who could collectively pool resources and begin to actually make these small idea explode. Thank you for the motivation and thank you for at least one idea I, as an individual, can implement.
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 17 weeks 2 days ago
    Pessimism
    Page Jim Davies
    Scott--I feel the very same way. Now, intellectually, I have not achieved the depth of understanding of STR philosophy, but I have an empathy for the ideology as vast as the ocean. Yes. I am one of the pessimists, and I do prattle on with a sentence or two of observation and not judgment. I am 69 now. Poor health. And I will never live to see the day when we do become honestly free.
  • tesla921's picture
    tesla921 17 weeks 2 days ago
    Pessimism
    Page Jim Davies
    That's a good question. I would define the masses as those who have been through 12 plus years of constant state indoctrination. The vast majority of these slaves think they are free. Even when you tell them that they are forced to work for the state half of their lives, they still think they are free. I like the idea of TOLFA. I like Galambos' V50 even.better. But, I don't think we have enough time to turn things around before our technology gets us. We now have enough hydrogen bombs to easily destroy all life on the planet. We have nuclear power plants managed by gov't idiots. And probably worst of all, gov't goons are in charge of advancing biological warfare technology. I'd say the probability that we completely destroy ourselves is much higher than perpetuating our species into the cosmos. It's not the way I want it, it's just the way it is.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 17 weeks 2 days ago Blog entry Jim Davies
    Comments are still accumulating on that Forbes site, and if anyone hasn't seen this yet, may I repeat the recommendation to do so. All the contributors are articulate, and the battle rages.   They make up the kind of exchange that should have characterized the Schiff trial - but that never came close to this standard of debate.   Anyone who regrets working every Monday for the FedGov's benefit ought not to miss it.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 17 weeks 2 days ago
    Pessimism
    Page Jim Davies
    How, quite, do you define "the masses"?   I do sometimes ridicule the "Booboisie" as a large number of couch potatoes, but not seriously. Even a low-IQ person can become intellectual dynamite when calculating odds on horses, or when busied by some other task by which he is strongly motivated. Isn't it important to avoid taking an elitist attitude? - nobody is born an anarchist, we were all pretty stupid once.   Subject to your better definition, I suppose the "masses" to consist of human beings; and human beings are, despite the dumbing-down they have suffered by government indoctrinators, rational and therefore educable animals like us.   But you're right; education is the only possible fix.  
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 17 weeks 3 days ago Web link Westernerd
    Very interesting comment. I see that the Kingdom of Heaven maintained its property was a nation separate from the USA; by what reasoning did Pastor Revere support that claim?   The contrary FedGov position would be that King George claimed it with the stroke of a pen and subsequently by force of arms, then those successors defeated his at Yorktown and subsequently granted statehood to Oregon, out of the goodness of their hearts. If that's so, then the Kingdom must either have negotiated its acquisition in some contract of transfer, or expelled the State's agents by force... or what?      
  • tesla921's picture
    tesla921 17 weeks 3 days ago
    Pessimism
    Page Jim Davies
    You can't educate the masses. Growing technology in the hands of politicians will soon enable them to render the human race extinct. Politicians are stupid enough to do it and the masses will vote for it if convinced by someone who wins a popularity contest. I wonder if we will make it another 20 years. I doubt it.
  • Thunderbolt's picture
    Thunderbolt 17 weeks 3 days ago
    Pessimism
    Page Jim Davies
    For me, there is anger. Lots of it. I want to direct the anger in a manner that is likely to be productive. Working within the system and armed revolution just do not work. The enemy actually loves those strategies. My interest in Jim's approach is that it has some chance of success. I very much want to accelerate the process, if it can be done, preferably before the imbeciles kill us all. I am looking forward to Google-glass eye-wear, for filming the miscreants without their knowledge. Bitcoin--- or something like it--- could cut the bastards off at the knees. The mafia wants to get paid, above all except power. I think an unexplored area might be to use television ads to play their own game back at them, maybe during sports events. I would target the youth, as does Dr. Paul. The ads could be very, very brief, directing the curious to STR or LRC or TOLFA. Thirty seconds might be sufficient. Maybe crowd-funding could be an option. It was recently used to fund the Bitcoin Dark Wallet project, which quickly reached its goal. How about Freeway Bloggers, hanging messages over the interstate!!! This might be the most cost-effective system of all. I suspect that there are thousands of people who would like to make a few hundred bucks/month in bitcoins.
  • Scott Lazarowitz's picture
    Scott Lazarowitz 17 weeks 3 days ago
    Pessimism
    Page Jim Davies
    It's hard to be optimistic when you hear about one act after another of police harassment, bullying, assaults, tasering, shooting and murdering of innocent people day after day, and only getting worse as well as the militarizing of local police. And the crimes being committed by agents of the federal government from NSA, FBI, CIA, ObamaCare, Common Core hacks, ObamaCrap, I'm disgusted with all this. But the sheeple - millions and millions of them - accept it. How can you be optimistic?   But then, the fact that many of the State's criminals are being filmed and the videos placed on YouTube for all to see, and the revelations of what exactly the NSA is actually doing (However, only 1% of the docs, Snowden? Let us see the remaining 99%, you bozo!), and the utter failure of ObamaCrap and its website  HealthDeath.Gov, I guess some of that can tend to cause someone to maybe begin to feel a little less pessimistic. Maybe.
  • newjerusalemtimes's picture
    newjerusalemtimes 17 weeks 3 days ago Web link Westernerd
    Yeah, I watched this after a FB friend posted it, as it was topic before Kokesh was to lead an armed march/protest on the District of Columbia, and I recently included these comments on that FB thread: Christian Livingstone: OK, I'm watching this one now Pippi, as you know that I was suggesting beforehand that Kokesh was making a weak case for arguing 2nd Ammendment rights in the District of Columbia, since the US Constitution doesn't technically or legally apply there. Sure, Natural or Common Law suggests that where there is no victim (including property damage), there is no crime. But, cops will say that Common Law doesn't exist anymore, and I've even asked them, "Why did you swear an oath to uphold it then?" Since they swear to uphold the US Constitution which mentions Common Law two or three times, and includes no Ammendment to abolish it for US purposes. Of course, the US Constitution is an arbitrary edict by a handful of long-dead Statist Idolators, but it's good to know an opponents frame of reference, especially if it's an organization of people with a history of using force, violence, extortion, and mass murder. I don't say these things to poke fun a Kokesh, as I was once a zealous, and still am, but not so naive, person in the battle against the State over the Property Tax Issue, in which I chose to be arrested and jailed three times after the initial raid and ejection of several of us on the Embassy of Heaven property in Jan. 1997. But, as a Christian Anarchist, I was willing to fight a losing battle, in which I could have of evaded each arrest. And I don't recommend that an activist or martyr whine or complain about fairly poor, but typical treatment by jail staff. Of course, like the Vietnamese people, who lost virtually every battle against a hostile, imperial invasion and occupation by the US Government Organization, which had a history of dropping nuclear bombs on defenseless Orientals who were currently suing for peace, still, the Vietnamese People won that carnal War!
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 17 weeks 3 days ago
    The Man With the Plan
    Blog entry Don Stacy
    Bob spoke very well to the merits of education vs violence, and very nearly hit the jackpot when he said that there will come a point when so many have been educated that to rule them will be impossible.   But as I wrote here in What a Time to be Alive! in 2012, a stategic plan consists of: Define and describe the objective Identify the method to be used Specify the time scale and milestones List the resources required, and where they can be found Name the key dependencies assumed, and test for credibility   Quite a few of those essential elements are still missing from what Bob said, I think.   Such a strategic plan was announced, however, on Strike the Root in 2006.
  • Bob Robertson's picture
    Bob Robertson 17 weeks 3 days ago Page Don Stacy
    With the SCOTUS ruling recently that finally nullifies the 5th Amendment, falling with the rest to the expedience of "better a hundred innocent men be imprisoned than one guilty man go free", I think it's desperately important to be thinking about the real hazards involved with revolution. Violent revolution is being presented on all sides -by- the state as the only remedy to an over-arching state. The two wars of secession, 1775 and 1861, are lynch-pins in the public schools, always showing that government won. Yet both only made the state more powerful. The alternative to education and time is action. The militarization of the "civilian" police is a clear indication of what the state WANTS. The state thrives on conflict, and is endangered by those who ignore it. Every time I hear people talk about a Constitutional Convention, I shudder, imagining the kind of crap that would come out of such an event now. In 1787, the Convention created a yet more powerful central govt, and today the result would be exactly the same. In times of crisis, a huge portion of the population cries out for someone to save them, and they will cede "minor" rights every time. Only through relentless, peaceful effort can the idea that there are no "minor" rights be spread far enough, wide enough, deeply enough, to thwart Leviathan.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 17 weeks 3 days ago Blog entry Jim Davies
    That's a very lively set of comments!  Waxman is fine, but when appealing on Irwin's behalf he did not dare present his strongest arguments and was actually fined $1,000 for going so far as to "raise the issue" of whether the i-tax might be voluntary.  The statute laws are (as Irwin says) okay, because they neither define "income" nor compel a payment of tax on it; but the courts will enforce complaince anyway. I know of no way around that blockage; they are utterly corrupt. They were deliberately set up to do what vote-sensitive Congresscritters may have left undone; see my "1789."
  • Don Stacy's picture
    Don Stacy 17 weeks 3 days ago Blog entry Don Stacy
    You pose several excellent questions to which, unfortunately, I do not have excellent answers.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 17 weeks 4 days ago
    Where's the Dignity?
    Page Tim Hartnett
    "That men should take up arms and spend their lives and fortunes, not to maintain their rights, but to maintain they have not rights, is an entirely new species of discovery..." ~ Thomas Paine Every generation has 'em, Thomas.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 17 weeks 4 days ago Blog entry Jim Davies
    Jim, did you read the comments section?  I first read the article a couple of days ago, and Reilly spouted typical establishment skepticism, but I was delighted to see the way he was corrected and taken to task by any numer of well-spoken Schiffites -- including Waxman, Irwin's attorney!  :-)
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 17 weeks 4 days ago
    Pure Evil?
    Blog entry Alex R. Knight III
    I concur with your definition of evil, except I would broaden the scope a little to include property as well -- such as stealing or vandalism.  Granted, you might argue that a person's property could be construed as an extension of them (that which they possess a vested interest in), and so your definition still holds, but I think the clarification helps.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 17 weeks 4 days ago Blog entry Don Stacy
    A very interesting clip, Don. Stefan is usually top-rate, but this one leaves me a bit uncomfortable. Where do the lines of responsibility lie, in the matter of child-raising?   A teenager turns out bad; he steals and assaults people. Are his parents to blame, or is he? Even more puzzling, a couple raises two boys, using identical methods; one turns out productive and benevolent, the other follows a life of crime (the real sort.) Why?   Parenting is certainly one powerful factor in character formation, but at some time between birth and adult-hood the new human makes his or her own choices and becomes responsible for them. If it were otherwise, all the evil choices people make could be blamed on Eve. I can't square that with the axiom of self-ownership.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 17 weeks 5 days ago
    NSA Attrition
    Blog entry Alex R. Knight III
    Well found, Alex. This is excellent news, and a good example of how government will be eliminated. When its own employees have quit in disgust, there will be nothing left.   I must admit that I expect that process to begin with the departure of low-level workers (upon whom the superstructure depends) and end with that of the most heavily indoctrinated, the top enforcers. The Fix anticipates that police will be among the very last to quit - but that they will quit for sure, when the pay clerks fail to forward their wages and the laundry declines to handle their uniforms, etc. But here, NSA folk are among the first to walk out, and they are near the top of the government heap.   I'm not complaining.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 17 weeks 5 days ago Page Don Stacy
    T-bolt, that's very profound. I don't recall seeing those four approaches compared before, side by side.   Tempting though it is, Bell's method uses violence, the enemy's weapon, and fails (if I understand it correctly) to end the state altogether anyway; it would continue to exist but to a less objectionable degree.   Casey's is fine in the short term, but again fails to end the state; it says to go where government ain't, but unfortunately that leaves government free to eliminate those safe havens. It's the shrinking sandbar problem I addressed in  The Power of One.   David King's is admirable too, for people willing to live that far under the radar - but it's hardly freedom, to do as one pleases with one's own life. Again, it fails to terminate the state.   So Casey's and King's ways may deliver short-term relief for the practitioner but do nothing to abolish government, while Bell's requires morally tainted methods and reduces its monstrous power only partly.   Guess which that leaves :-)
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 17 weeks 5 days ago
    Pure Evil?
    Blog entry Alex R. Knight III
    Interesting, indeed!  For one thing it's astounding that in this enlightened age, as many as 70% of Americans still believe the devil exists.   It's a handy way, I suppose, to shrug off responsibility. The devil made me vote.   Its definition of "evil" is not bad: "taking pleasure in the intentional inflicting of harm on innocent others." I thought that was usually called schadenfreude, but it serves. The one I prefer is simply to say that evil is taking any unprovoked action which imposes force upon another human being. But yes, presumably the aggressor takes such action because he enjoys doing it.
  • livemike's picture
    livemike 17 weeks 6 days ago Page Lawrence Samuels
    "Has Government Legalized Fraud?" Where have you been? Social Security "Trust Fund" anyone?
  • Thunderbolt's picture
    Thunderbolt 17 weeks 6 days ago Page Don Stacy
    This is an important issue. I have identified groups that have radically different views. I want to believe that Jim Davies has the right approach: education plus time, with one on one replication. Opposing him are television and public school. Jim Bell thinks that anonymous warfare via Assassination Politics, will get the job done, essentially shifting the fear from the enslaved serfs to the ruling elite. Doug Casey thinks voting with your feet is the only rational recourse to oppression, and that history demonstrates that trying to change things from within a police state is a waste of time, and may well result in your death or imprisonment. Andrew Napolitano says it is very dangerous to be right when your government is wrong. A possible fourth view might be that of the renegade anarchist, who refuses to pay taxes, refuses to leave, and makes his money off the grid, perhaps using crypto-currencies and encrypted communication, or simply refuses to make more than a subsistence income, well below taxable levels. Here, I think of the genius David B. King, living in Wyoming in his school bus with his several cats.
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 17 weeks 6 days ago Page Don Stacy
    Hasnas makes a good point that I can relate to and this is a pertinent subject to consider; I enjoyed reading it even though it came off as a bit negative.  I consider this proposition a false dilemma because I'm optimistic about the long run and pessimistic about the short term.  Enjoy life and the quest for truth will be it's own reward.  My happiness isn't based on what others do, say, think or understand, but on what I do, say, think and understand.  Nothing worthwhile is easy to do.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 17 weeks 6 days ago Page Don Stacy
    Your closing recommendation, Don, is hereby emphatically rejected.   I'm also very sorry to read that in your opinion the Libertarian "worldview is idealistic and empirically false." I'd have thought that almost everything we read on STR powerfully demonstrates the contrary, and that in any case for someone to hold that opinion and yet to call himself a Libertarian is contradictory on its face.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 17 weeks 6 days ago Page Don Stacy
    Odd thing about people who openly announce their being an anarchist. They tend to be tenured college faculty members or else socially and economically marginalised sorts who barely get by. Both sorts are mainly dismissed as cranks.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 17 weeks 6 days ago Page Don Stacy
    A great essay Don, and one that incorporates what I think is so far one of the unsung all-time classic libertarian essays.  Hasnas nails it.   But I have to disagree with you on a finer point, and that is how you define the criteria of libertarian optimists and pessimists: I don't believe that a libertarian optimist needs to still believe in the State as a valid vehicle.  I certainly don't, and at least most of the time consider myself one of the optimists.  However, I vacillate on occasion to the pessimistic arena.  Depends on what kind of day I'm having.  :-)   Again, great one!   Best,   Alex
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 18 weeks 2 days ago Page Lawrence Samuels
    A century ago, the health-care industry was in chaos. Every physician offered help on his own terms, with a charge varying at his own discretion;  nobody had a right to health care and if not satisfied in one clinic, one could turn on a dime and consult another. Hospitals often had to rely on charitable contributions. And few people had any insurance at all!   Today, none of those things is true and if all goes according to plan before Obama leaves office, everyone will have the right to care paid for by one government agency. Order will prevail at last.   So Lawrence, I'll take the chance to recommend your fine book "In Defense of Chaos" to one and all. It's a brain-strainer in parts but overall, a masterpiece. And thanks for this article.
  • Thunderbolt's picture
    Thunderbolt 18 weeks 3 days ago
    Lawmaking Lunacy
    Page Jim Davies
    "When government has vanished," is such a delightful phrase. First, we have to imagine what could be, before we can have it.
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 18 weeks 3 days ago Page Lawrence Samuels
    The state is legalized fraud writ large, ObamaCare is only the latest iteration.  The bill of goods called a "social contract" being sold as "the consent of the governed" is massive fraud.  The Constitution is a fraud.  Fractional Reserve Banking is legalized fraud.  All laws condeming perpatrators of victimless crimes are a fraud.  Creating boogeymen to justify the police state and sending soldiers throughout the Empire is pure fraud.  I'm hardpressed to think of anything the state does that's not a fraud.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 18 weeks 4 days ago
    Where's the Dignity?
    Page Tim Hartnett
    "When public employees can stop you at random and take whatever they want without risking prison or legitimately being shot on the spot, you have no rights." That is the correct conclusion, because rights are a fantasy. There is only will. At some point people are going to decide they won't put up with it any more. The only thing that is stopping them, outside of residual fear that should hardly exist for the older ones among us, is the worry that their fellows will think ill of them for standing up. People do care what others think of them. But I think the fear is overblown. Most people who aren't completely asleep are by now just waiting for someone else to start the shooting.