Recent comments

  • Paul's picture
    Paul 25 weeks 1 day ago Page Don Stacy
    Don, it is amusing that the only way out of the dilemma of "marginal humans" is to treat people as a collective, rather than treating them individually. How statist! One would expect something like that would have you questioning your premises... In fact this is not a rare occurrence. People who use the language of rights often paint themselves into corners. No wonder there are so many arguments over it. Your real null hypothesis is that humans have rights AND animals don't. The contrapositive is either that animals do have rights, OR that humans don't. If you ask me, the latter is the more reasonable view. Nobody has rights. Animals don't have rights not because of some deficiency, but because rights are a fantasy. They don't exist at all, other than as a very inconsistently-held meme among most people, similar to the older meme that the earth is flat. Rothbard was wrong too (not that that happens very often). The capacity for choice, adopting goals and values, and all the rest, do not depend on the existence of rights. I don't believe in the fantasy of rights, yet I still choose and have values. http://strike-the-root.com/life-without-rights
  • Thunderbolt's picture
    Thunderbolt 25 weeks 1 day ago Page Paul Hein
    Dr. Hein: You have defined the core problem. Bravo! Taxation is indeed the root of all evil. (F.Chodorov) It is nothing but a glorified mugging at gunpoint.
  • tesla921's picture
    tesla921 25 weeks 1 day ago
    The Law
    Page Paul Bonneau
    I agree. Laws of nature are out there to be discovered and lived with. Man made laws are opinions of men backed by force. Man made laws should be called coercive rules.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 25 weeks 2 days ago
    How Big is Space?
    Blog entry Jim Davies
    Thanks, ReverendDraco! So I wasn't the first to notice the anomaly, and the Big Bangers have explained it by positing an exception to the general rule that "c" is a constant, to apply just in the earliest moments of the Bang.   It still smells fishy, to me. However could that theory be tested? And I had thought that Einstein's theory did propose that light - certainly a form of energy - could not exceed the speed limit of c.  But I'm several decades out of date, and in physics that's a very long time. String theories get me really strung out.   I wonder further: if c is actually variable (by "many times") then c squared would be capable of huge enlargement; and so the energy produced in a nuclear explosion could perhaps become ten or a hundred times greater than anything yet seen. Great! Just what the world needs - a super super government bomb.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 25 weeks 2 days ago
    The Law
    Page Paul Bonneau
    A very good point, emartin; "law" is a word with two very different meanings, and that leads to much confusion. Since those of nature seem to be immutable, I wonder whether the Parasite Class chose the word deliberately, to convey the impression that their rules too were immutable.   We could flip the argument, however; allow that their laws are merely political opinions backed by force, but re-visit the name we give to natural principles. I actually prefer it that way round, for the "law" of gravity, for example, is not immutable or unquestionable at all. On the contrary, it is the very heart of the scientific method to question what appears to be fixed; to observe and test, to theorize, then to test again. Once a principle is found which seems to stand up, the proper name for it is an hypothesis or a theory; hence, the theory of gravity holds that two bodies attract one another with a force proportional to the product of their masses and inversely to the square of the distance between them.   That is not a law! It's a theory, waiting to be questioned and improved. Einstein claimed to have modified it, and maybe he did; but it's vitally important to grasp that one day, someone might.
  • emartin's picture
    emartin 25 weeks 2 days ago
    The Law
    Page Paul Bonneau
    Inertia, gravity, thermodynamics, etc. have laws. They weren't created by humans and can't be repealed by humans. Humans who pretend that a human can create laws are frauds. It would probably be a good idea for those of us that know better to absolutely refuse to use the word "laws" in place of the proper word, which is "rules". Maybe we can establish a new meme that will get the masses to realize that rules are made by rulers.
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 25 weeks 2 days ago Web link Sharon Secor
    As I understand it, if you drop one of these and break them open you are to clear away, call the EPA and or a HAZMAT team to come and clear it away. Simply another plot towards genocide of American people. Buy as many light bulbs as you can.
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 25 weeks 2 days ago
    The Law
    Page Paul Bonneau
    Nice opening sentence. "What would it take to make a conservative condemn the law?" Actually the truth, but the problem with the truth is that it seems to grow into a lie. I like "natural tendencies". maybe "natural emotions" or better yet "psychopathic tendencies towards wisdom", yet, calling them simply psychopathic laws is probably the most appropriate. "Self preservation dictates he behaves otherwise" a fine example wherein reasoning does not come into play, but rather common sense in staying alive. I guess you could break that down into a syllogism if you wanted, but our driver has come to an emotional and creative value of following the custom. To everything there is a purpose. Laws have a purpose, to create surfs, slaves, robots, homeless, helpless, mindless and on ad nauseaum. I subscribe to a site which lists all the current legislation coming up for a vote and or suggested to be voted on. As I read through them I cannot help but to wonder where these individuals obtained their education. It is my speculation their education stopped the day they graduated and the remainder became accumulated through on the job experience, gaining knowledge and wisdom from those psychopaths before them never to pick up a book to read again for the remainder of their--too busy lives of making up stupid laws. I have finally given up on the effort of self-defense via voting, but I persist in writing my idiots in an attempt to instruct them in what little I know. Yes. I realize their monkeys read the script, but the hope here is that one of them will begin to catch onto what is happening and finally depart for greener pastures. Entertaining piece. In closing I must say that I believe there should be a law written that every legal U.S. Citizen be required to carry a firearm of any nature with the exclusion of felons, murders, violent people, crazy people, conscientious objectors and etc.
  • tesla921's picture
    tesla921 25 weeks 2 days ago
    The Law
    Page Paul Bonneau
    When you live in a society where the biggest thief and murderer is in charge of making the "law", you can't win. Unfortunately, all states are like this. If you work for the state, you know what you are.
  • ReverendDraco's picture
    ReverendDraco 25 weeks 2 days ago
    How Big is Space?
    Blog entry Jim Davies
    Well. . . as near as I can tell (and, granted, I'm an autodidact when it comes to physics). . . from the first few Planck Times until the space-time continuum settled down, everything expanded at many times the speed of light - hence, a universe much larger than the amount of Continuum Time that has passed would allow for. Einstein wasn't mistaken. . . Matter is nothing more than condensed energy - there is nothing in Einstein's theory which claims that energy cannot exceed the speed of light - only matter. During the Plank Times (and certainly a bit into Continuum Time) the universe contained, in an area of quantum compactness, "infinite" energy - the same infinite energy Einstein posits is necessary for matter to achieve FTL speeds. So, the matter which constitutes the stars and rocks *could* have traveled (and did travel, in all likelihood) at many times the speed of light in the earliest instances of the universe - both as energy, and, as energy coalesced into matter, as matter propelled by "infinite energy." This inquiring mind had to know. . .
  • ReverendDraco's picture
    ReverendDraco 25 weeks 2 days ago
    The Law
    Page Paul Bonneau
    I wouldn't call your paraphrasing "overheated" - I'd call it an understatement, as you forgot some of the most accurate descriptors of the gang: Scum-sucking bottom-feeders, racketeers, extortionists, con men and larcenists. As there are only 2 *actual* crimes, there is no moral high ground standing in favor of mala prohibita laws. Drunk driving is not an actual crime - the laws against it, on the other hand, *are* actual crimes. Those who support such laws are *actual* criminals. It all comes down to this: Every Crime Needs a Victim. "Just as every husband needs a wife, every child needs a parent, and every teacher needs a pupil, so every crime needs a victim. Not a potential victim or possible victim or a supposed victim, but an actual victim." Manufactured victims don't count.
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 25 weeks 3 days ago
    Abortion
    Page Jim Davies
    Thank you Jim. I deeply appreciate the remark with all sincerity. When people vote for president they seldom if ever vote in relationship to the mans character, but rather the lies he tells us. If he is handsome many women swoon to vote. When I voted I tried to garner the character of the man; is he true to his word and what has he done to demonstrate that quality, and etc. No one I ever voted for ever won. I have finally given up on the idea that voting was my way of self-defense but now see it is more self-destruction. I think of all Boehner spit out about how poor he was and how hard he had to work and now the turns his back on the American people. I will not give up my assault in writing to them and telling them what idiots they are. With all the materials I have gathered here and there I have plenty to assault with.
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 25 weeks 3 days ago
    Abortion
    Page Jim Davies
    Just curious, but how many wrongs does it take to put them right? How long does one have to suffer the injustice until justice is served.
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 25 weeks 3 days ago Web link mhstahl
    To catch a rat one must set a trap. Any ideas?
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 25 weeks 3 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    This is merely the governments forward effort to assert that they are in control of everything and they intend to keep it that way. Moochers, elect looters, to rob from the productive. Ergo, there must be some asset there worth going after or at least that is what the Boy in the White House thinks, if that is at all possible?!
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 25 weeks 3 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    A cryptic news story that leaves the most salient question unanswered: Who are these "advisors" training and otherwise giving advise to?
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 25 weeks 4 days ago Web link mhstahl
    This was the same bureau-rat who promised the We the People Foundation strenuously that there would be a full and open public inquiry of the IRS and Treasury Department at the National Press Club to answer once and for all whether they had the legal authority to impose and collect income taxes on Americans.   Boy, did he ever do some backpedalling right after making those "promises."  So obvious that he was talked to "confidentially," shall I say, in the interim...
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 25 weeks 4 days ago
    Abortion
    Page Jim Davies
    After a year and a quarter, I see that Professor Block has published a "rejoinder" to Becky Akers, Butler Shaffer and myself on this subject; here's the link.   I'm not presently inclined to prolong the discussion, but notice his closing paragraph with respect to the article above. It begins:   "Davies (2012) is a very strange kind of anarchist. He equates this state of affairs with the entire absence of all law: “In the future, when government has vanished there will be no mechanism for imposing anything on everyone else."   "No, no, a thousand times no..."   Anarchism is by definition the absence of a ruler, ie one who imposes his will on other people; the reader can therefore judge easily whether it is Block or myself who is a "strange kind of anarchist."   Nothing I've written about justice in a free society should, of course, allow the impression that wrongs will not be put right - but that process must not be confused, as I fear Block is doing, with "law." Laws are opinions, backed by force. They are irreconcilable with freedom, and I repeat as above: when there is no government, there will be no law.  
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 25 weeks 5 days ago Blog entry Emmett Harris
    Emmett, Where I am all I have available to me is the bird in the sky. You are on a "Fair Access Code" When your clock runs down on your availability of internet it gets shut off for 24 hours. If I watch two minutes of You Tube I loose 10% plus of internet time. Can't figure that one out. Where they get cops like this I don't know, but there are a few good ones, but not enough to outweigh the bad; yen and yang seem to rule the universe.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 25 weeks 5 days ago Blog entry Emmett Harris
    Emmett, I'm not trying to say I place faith in them.  However, in my now going on 12 years of experience here -- and 20+ years of experience there -- they are far less numerous, and far more well-mannered and courteous than their NH counterparts.  The difference is marked.  Completely different attitude and mentality.  That said, the socialist system they perpetuate by being employed in it needs to change without question -- and the sooner the better.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 25 weeks 6 days ago Blog entry Emmett Harris
    That view does seem to be shared by a certain former lady prisoner in Windsor.
  • Emmett Harris's picture
    Emmett Harris 25 weeks 6 days ago Blog entry Emmett Harris
    I wouldn't put too much faith in the police within VT either.  
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 25 weeks 6 days ago Blog entry Emmett Harris
    :-)
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 25 weeks 6 days ago Blog entry Emmett Harris
    Jim:  I don't think you'll have to wonder very hard.  Suffice it to say I'm glad I came here to Vermont.  Have never regretted it.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 25 weeks 6 days ago Blog entry Emmett Harris
    Is this in Seabrook, New Hampshire? But NH is the "Live Free or Die" State!   I wonder what Alex Knight thinks.
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 25 weeks 6 days ago Web link Sharon Secor
    This is the refletion of the cognitive ability of the American Legislators. Just read recently that the Obamacare act, DOJ and another acronym is filing chagres at the Little Sister Nuns for refusal to sign permission slipsforaortion. The GOVERNMENT IS GOING AFTER NUNS FOR GODS SAKE. The only climate prediction I see that is coming near the truth is the one reported in Time magazine around 1976. "An Ice Ag Is comming"
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 25 weeks 6 days ago
    A Glorious Event!
    Page Paul Hein
    Oh, P.S. His drivers licenses is expired also.
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 25 weeks 6 days ago
    A Glorious Event!
    Page Paul Hein
    Ha. You legal eagles. I have a son 37 years old who has been driving around all over the state with an an expired, plate, expired tag,no registration and not proof of insurance. Why he has not been stopped yet is beyond me. If it were me I would be caught the first day. He has been driving this way now for two years.
  • PaulTheCabDriver's picture
    PaulTheCabDriver 26 weeks 2 days ago
    A Glorious Event!
    Page Paul Hein
    Paul, you people in Missouri are so damned lucky! You get colored decals to put on YOUR license plates. And you get TWO license plates too: One for the back and one for the front. Out here in Arizona, we only get one measly license plate. And it's not even embossed. The letters on it are just printed on a flat plate! And we don't get color stickers either. Ours are black and white. It sucks I tell you. I want my money back!
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 26 weeks 2 days ago
    A Glorious Event!
    Page Paul Hein
    When they get laughed at, their fate is sealed. A very nice one, Paul Hein.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 26 weeks 2 days ago Web link Sharon Secor
    Call it the "War on Farts".
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 26 weeks 2 days ago Web link Sharon Secor
    [I find it humorous that there are people that expected their concerns to be addressed.] Maybe they didn't expect it. Meanwhile it is a great embarrassment for the rulers, so it can't be a bad thing.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 26 weeks 2 days ago Web link Sharon Secor
    Some laws just beg to be disobeyed.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 26 weeks 2 days ago
    A Glorious Event!
    Page Paul Hein
    Paul, I can fully appreciate your sarcastic tone in this article. I too feel great pride and reverence when applying the colorful stickers to my plates. Fortunately my state charges a lot less for the privilege to do so ($1,659.07, ouch!) - more like a hundred dollars. Wife bought a new car recently, a Porsche. The dealer asked if we wanted them to drill holes in the bumper to hold the plate. Confused, I asked him if I had a choice (Oregon is not a state with optional front plates). He said legally no, but that some of his customers nevertheless insisted their bumpers not have holes drilled in them, and they just took their chances. I thought we'd give that a try. After all, one gets to the stage where obedience is no longer automatic. The older I get, the less I give a shit about what legiscritters want. For your amusement, "The License Plate War": http://www.ncc-1776.org/tle2013/tle739-20130929-05.html
  • Don Stacy's picture
    Don Stacy 26 weeks 3 days ago Page Don Stacy
    I have yet to see that want ad either.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 26 weeks 3 days ago
    Peace, Spurned
    Page Jim Davies
    The syphilis theory is possible, Lawrence, but I doubt it and hope it's wrong.   His father Randolph may have had and transmitted the disease, but even that is doubtful - a brain tumor is also likely. In Winston's case, if he had a malady he could not help, it makes him less than responsible for the evil be caused; he'd deserve sympathy more than blame.   In any case, Winston's mental powers were stong enough for him to manage the political game until age 80, when some strokes took him out of it. He lived until age 90, despite a lifetime of heavy drinking and smoking. He was almost fearless; his love of warfare was genuine; he fought in South Africa and, after being eased out of government in 1915, volunteered for the front in France.   "Evil" is a mysterious thing. As reasoned here, I reckon it's not so much that people are evil, rather that it's what almost anyone may do when handed power over other people.
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 26 weeks 4 days ago
    Peace, Spurned
    Page Jim Davies
    Yes, I also remember that he once wrote something like the biggest problem with the world was that there weren't enough wars. Do you think he had syphilis of the brain? His father had it bad for a long time, and I have to wonder if it was transmitted to Winston. Even the canonical Manchester bio has that information.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 26 weeks 4 days ago
    Peace, Spurned
    Page Jim Davies
    War-crazy, indeed. Yet he did, for sure, have a way with words. Here's one:   Lady Astor: Mr Churchill, you are drunk! Churchill: Lady Astor, you are right. However, you are ugly. And tomorrow morning, I shall be sober.
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 26 weeks 4 days ago
    Peace, Spurned
    Page Jim Davies
    Thanks Jim, for bringing this to our attention. This is a great instructive story about the lunacy of Churchill.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 26 weeks 5 days ago
    Peace, Spurned
    Page Jim Davies
    Thank you, T-bolt. This was only one of several German offers to end the war. Perhaps it was the most explicit - I've not delved in to the others. Hess' 1941 flight was designed to be interpretable either way; if he succeeded it would be a triumph for the Führer; if it failed (as it did) Hess was to be scorned as a lunatic acting on his own. Don't let's imagine Hitler was a pacifist, of course; he never wanted a 1939 war in the West and wished to end it ASAP, but only so he could focus force on Russia.   The currents of British opinion in this period are interesting. Broadly, the working class hated Fascism out of some sympathy for Communism, the Nazis' stated prime enemy. The aristocracy (not having read von Mises) was terrified of Communism and so saw Fascism as a useful bulwark against it; that was the origin of the Chamberlain - Halifax camp. The middle class wished to avoid war and was generally conservative and patriotic. But in mid-1939 there was a huge swing of opinion against the man who had broken the word he gave at Munich; and from then on, Chamberlain was a prisoner of the voter, and of his own folly in bending to FDR's will in March by "guaranteeing the integrity of Poland."   Had an armistice been agreed in mid-1940, I think the UK public would have swallowed the pill. Horrid memories of 1914-18 were still fresh.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 26 weeks 5 days ago
    Where?
    Page Paul Hein
    You can run, but you can't hide. I am a sovereign state. I have borders across which you must not step without my say-so. Well, I wish you wouldn't. But I'm old and feeble and may not be able to stop you. So please don't. I regard psychopaths organized into that mindless abstraction called "the state" in the same manner that I treat venomous snakes and other dangerous critters. They should be avoided whenever and wherever possible. The cost and discomfort of knee-high boots is like a tax for going to the woods and along the river. I could go barefoot or with sneakers, but snakes observe no property rights, nor do they concern themselves with my convenience or pleasure. Resent it I might, but wear 'em I do. And, considering the bright side, snakes feed on and help control rodents, mosquitoes, and other vermin. So if you're rat and mosquito free, thank a rattler. Sam
  • Thunderbolt's picture
    Thunderbolt 26 weeks 5 days ago
    Peace, Spurned
    Page Jim Davies
    The wickedness --and effectiveness--of public school indoctrination and centralized power radiate in your article. "Such is the high cost of silver political tongues. Such is the wickedness of patriotism." Your grasp of history is amazing. It is striking that I cannot recall having learned that Hitler presented a reasoned alternative to this bloodbath, except from you. In essence, perhaps Germany defeated Britain and the U.S., but it took about 70 years to become apparent.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 26 weeks 6 days ago
    Peace, Spurned
    Page Jim Davies
    Well written, Jim.  Was unaware of the unaccepted dubious olive branch.  As an adjunct, have on the way a 1941-42 1,000 + page volume by Hitler, Mein Neu Ordnung (My New Order).  Should be interesting.  I also have on deck Soldiers of Misfortune.  Please type that into the fff.org search engine and find an excellent series of articles by Jacob Hornberger on that book.  For some reason, I can't provide hyperlinks to STR while using this browser (IE 11).
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 26 weeks 6 days ago
    Vandals
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    Alex--I suffered the batterd mail box syndrome for years. It is an inevitable all over the country. My first box was made of steel welded together. You think that would stop kids from battering the box. Nope. They blew it up with a pipe bomb. Federal offense. Sheriff came out looked around and said. " What do you want me to do about it?" I said "Find the." He said "How. there is absolutely no usable evidence". Down one steel welded mail box. Next was the typical mail box. Smashed, third one was plastic. They melted it with a fire bomb. My last one and still standing is made from oil field pipe 3/8" thick. Well. They blew the hell out of the door but the box remains. It stands today. Oh!. It is mounted into the ground with oil field pipe about 3 feet deep with concrete. If a snow plow were to hit it I am sure it would up root the box, but it would send the truck for a couple of 360 degree turns down the road and maybe into the ditch. Snow plows seem to avoid my mail box like it was a plague because I see wide sweeps away from it. Just a bit of trivia for today, and so you now you are not alone in this disease. Some people around here build a batter board. It is placed to the side of the mail box from the direction traffic flows. 4x4'ss are used and 2x6 are slatted up the 4x4's. In either direction the batter is going to be shaken with a serious reverberation from trying to batter it. This tactic seems to work around here. I've not done it because mine is 3/8" oil field pipe, seven to eight inches in diameter.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 27 weeks 51 min ago
    Vandals
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    Jim, it's a shame the late, great Loompanics Unlimited is now defunct -- I believe you'd be able to sell Michael Hoy on the publication of a slim instructional volume, Mailbox Musk Guns, or something similar.  :-)  The old Johnson Smith Company of 1970s comic book ads comes to mind as well.   For the time being I've rendered the battered box useful once again for both the receiving and sending of government mail.  It's just cosmetically challenged.  Perhaps, given that Uncle Sam arrogantly considers it his property, that is appropriate.  Should another attack occur and make the box nonfunctional, I will then replace it with something far less attractive to an assault.  'Nuff Said.  :-)
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 27 weeks 1 hour ago
    Vandals
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    Great article on L. Neil Smith's site, Paul!  And your suggestions for mailbox fortification, as well.  :-)  Of course my caveat "for the time being" speaks to your first statement, and I agree that it would likely take care of most of the issues right there.  My own further caveat, at the very beginning of my column, presaged your entire reply.  :-)
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 27 weeks 2 hours ago
    Vandals
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    Your misfortune, Alex, has spun the wheels of invention. I've come up with a concept design for a non-lethal defense device. It requires expertese in chemistry, electronics and firearms.   The chemist would concoct a supply of that kind of liquid that a skunk squirts to deter predators. You know, the sort that fouls up the whole neighborood for hours on end.   The circuit to be designed would have two parts, sensory and motor. The sensor would detect the noise made when a baseball bat (wooden or metal) hits a mailbox. Account would have to be taken of amplitude (to prevent false alarm when the flap-door is slammed by a mailman) and the audiographics profile. The motor part would cause a trigger to be released as follows, when the impact noise is detected.   The firearms expert - your goodself - would secure a toy water pistol to the mailbox and to the circuit, painted neutrally (battleship gray might fit well) and positioned to be invisible to approaching marauders. It would be pointed at where the open starboard window of a passing pickup would be, directly after an attack. And it would be filled with the chemist's brew.   With good luck, the resulting squirt will hit the bat-wielder full-face, so reducing him to the Untouchables Caste for the week following - and greatly assisting detectors of his crime. With a little less luck, it will at least enter the pickup cabin, necessitating the heavy use of perfume - which will expose the owner to various kinds of ridicule. At the very least, a wide shot will smear the side of the vehicle so as to make it unattractive to passengers such as dates.   The device, once built and perfected, should be marketable by the million, so propelling you at long last into the 1%. Whaddayathink?    
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 27 weeks 13 hours ago Web link A. Magnus
    "When The State Eliminates Privacy, It Owns YOU" Nonsense. When you fear the state attacks on privacy, it owns you. Roberts is simply wrong about this, and also far too defeatist for my taste. He needs to get control of his fear. http://strike-the-root.com/privacy-conundrum
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 27 weeks 13 hours ago Web link A. Magnus
    In the end, he was arrested because he permitted it.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 27 weeks 13 hours ago Web link A. Magnus
    The sporting opportunities are obvious. Get that shotgun out of the closet and polish those skeet shooting skills...