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  • ReverendDraco's picture
    ReverendDraco 49 weeks 3 days ago Page Paul Bonneau
    "Those homeless dudes should go to the library and enjoy the wonders showered on us all by our betters; keep ‘em out of trouble." Only thing is. . . when they do that, someone inevitably writes a letter to the editor, denigrating the homeless for making use of a service which they helped pay for. Of course, the person is usually a Statist shill or sycophant.
  • ReverendDraco's picture
    ReverendDraco 49 weeks 3 days ago Page PSYCHOTICNUT
    This is similar to the way my wife and I entered into our marriage (5 years this coming May). It was publicly declaring our intent to *work* for our relationship rather than giving up/moving out at the first sign of trouble. The way we see it, when a couple is "merely" living together, it's too easy to say "screw it," and leave - we've both been in those kinds of relationships. . . We both feel an intense dislike for the modern "throw-away" society. We both have cars over 10 years old (hers is 20, and mine is 27); we held on to our CRT television until it died entirely; most of our furniture is family heirlooms. What we see, much too often, are people who treat marriage in the same "throw-away" manner as they treat everything else - whatever is new and shiny must be had; tried-and-true be damned. We also believe that the concept of a "50/50" relationship is nonsense - it's either 100/100 or what the hell are you even together for? Marriage is a full-time job. Funny thing - if you look at the "traditional" wedding vows, they read much like a contract - Do you promise to Love, honor, cherish, obey, for better or worse, for richer or poorer, in sickness & in health, til death. . . the only significant difference is, there are no listed penalties for failing to abide by the terms and conditions. Nothing in the traditional contract stating that, if either party fails to uphold their end of the bargain, the contract is dissolved - no-one gives up X property for breach of contract (you don't find that out until divorce court - or by word-of-mouth). . . Nothing.
  • Scott Lazarowitz's picture
    Scott Lazarowitz 49 weeks 3 days ago Page PSYCHOTICNUT
    "One might say, 'All this may be true, but marriage is good for keeping couples together.' To which I would reply, if you need to force your partner to stay with you through the institution of marriage, it may be better that you split. There is no virtue in force and the institution of marriage is an institution of force."   So a voluntary contract is "force"? (Unless you're talking about a "shotgun wedding"...)   No, marriage is not "force," it is voluntary. There's nothing wrong with a contract associated with personal and/or romantic relationships. (I wonder if you've been through a bad marriage and are resentful, or perhaps no marital experiecnes at all?)
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 49 weeks 3 days ago Page Paul Hein
    These are devilishly tough questions, Darkcrusade!   Seems to me they show what a lot of homework the enemy has done. Mr Gov, at the table, can point to all that in-depth preparation, done over centuries.  Much of it stems, I dare say, from the stroke of the pen of George III, by which he laid claim to North America, and the Treaty of Paris which transferred his declaration of ownership to the winners of the Revolutionary War.   I don't think, though, that they alter Paul's point. The governmental declaration of ownership may go back deep into history, but it's still a declaration and nothing more. Mr Gov has no more just and moral right of ownership than His Late Majesty; he "owns" it only because he says so, and can enforce his claim.   You asked about a remedy, but within the paradigm that government exists, I see none. There is no hope that they will interpret their rules in our favor. Therefore, the only remedy is for it to evaporate. If you're not on board the program to bring that about yet, join now.
  • Thunderbolt's picture
    Thunderbolt 49 weeks 3 days ago Page PSYCHOTICNUT
    Nice article, Steven, with powerful implications. Most men are aware of how badly they fare in divorce court. This is truly a paradigm shift in power.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 49 weeks 3 days ago Page PSYCHOTICNUT
    Interesting history, Steven, and welcome aboard!   I wonder if the idea of marriage as a contract might be given greater prominence. A contract not between a father and the bridegroom, but between bride and groom. A mutual promise to stay together, rather than to part company as soon as turbulence arises.   If so, would you still oppose the honoring of such a contract?    
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 49 weeks 4 days ago Page Paul Hein
    Your delightfully simple scenario, Paul, conceals the fact that behind Mr Gov (or perhaps outside but surrounding the room) stand at his command several Kevlar-covered thugs with an unlimited number if guns, ready to take from you anything and everything you were unwilling to surrender at the table. In other words, Mr Gov is not merely saying "That property is ours because we say so", but also "and if you don't agree, we'll take it by force." He is therefore revealing and exercising the government view of property: that stuff belongs to whoever can acquire, retain or recover it, forcefully. That's another way of saying that "might is right" or that "possession equals ownership" - that is, whoever presently has stuff and can forcibly retain it, owns it. The notions of rights to property, of morality, are foreign to that government view. That ownership and physical possession are two different things, separated by concepts of morality and justice, is not only a fundamental libertarian premise but has antecedents going back centuries, probably millennia. Those who conflate or confuse them are no better than government agents. "Property rights" did not begin with Rothbard, but their denial is a high government priority.
  • ReverendDraco's picture
    ReverendDraco 49 weeks 4 days ago Page Paul Hein
    Just out of curiosity, how do you deal with reposting these articles elsewhere? I would like to repost it, verbatim (including a link to STR and credit to Paul) - but am unsure if it is allowed. All that aside. . . a well-written bit for sure. I can almost see Mr. Gov having an apoplexy. . .
  • Darkcrusade's picture
    Darkcrusade 49 weeks 4 days ago Page Paul Hein
    ''Suppose you are seated at one end of a table, and government is seated at the other. Between you lies your wallet, the deed to your home, title to your car, and all other assets you own.'' Devil's advocate states; Who's image and subscription are upon those Federal Reserve Notes(nots) babelbux within 'your wallet'? Who's control number is upon 'your' deed-simple, that you submitted(applied for) paperwork to generate? Who's control number is upon 'your' (EN-)title(MENT) for your car,from the government, that you submitted(applied for)paperwork to generate? All other assets purchased using the kings currency and Satanic debt-money scheme? Here lies the mystery of why the creator gets control of his creation. He that creates gets to control. Perhaps there is an escape hatch on this Emerald city? http://www.suijurisforum.com/it-doesn-t-work-t174.html
  • John deLaubenfels's picture
    John deLaubenfels 49 weeks 4 days ago Page Paul Bonneau
    Lately I've read several columns with the theme, "We have to be careful not to behave (or advocate) in a way that will cause average people to think we're kooks."  Tucker's offering is another of this genre.  I couldn't disagree more!  This is a game that can never be won, but can only cause its practitioner to water down his own principles until he stands for nothing.  Of course, nobody should act (or advocate) in a way that is gratitously offensive, but the best way to teach the world that liberty works is to live it!  Make and live our choices, even the ones that seem unthinkable to many people.  Show that it doesn't make the sky fall.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 49 weeks 4 days ago
    M for Malaysia
    Blog entry Jim Davies
    Early this morning Wired Magazine published a theory by Canadian pilot Chris Goodfellow about what happened to this flight (and thanks to LRC for the link.)   It makes a lot better sense than any other I've heard - including, alas, my own. It accounts for the aircraft silence right after leaving Malaysian airspace, the long flight somewhere over the Indian Ocean, and the direction it took at least initially; the latter with great accuracy. It does not require either of the crew to have been murderous, nor the presence of a hijacker. Worth a read.
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 49 weeks 4 days ago Page Paul Hein
    Revealing circular logic to a fool typically gets little more than a blank stare, but this profound attempt just may do the trick for some.  Well done, sir.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 49 weeks 4 days ago Web link Emmett Harris
    If I understand this article, it sounds like the undriver license thing is pretty harmless (although a tad preachy). The "commuter trip reduction law", on the other hand, is just another tyrant grab for power.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 49 weeks 4 days ago Page Paul Hein
    "On one side, we have the owner of the property, whose ownership is unquestioned and unquestionable. On the other hand, we have Mr. Gov, who claims a greater right to the property because he’s written down that he is entitled to it, and that by some ineffable power this transfers ownership of the property from its owner, to Mr. Gov." Both notions are wrong. Your property, is just the stuff you can prevent others from taking. :-) http://strike-the-root.com/private-property-vs-your-stuff
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 49 weeks 5 days ago Page Paul Hein
    Thank you, Paul. This is frighteningly simple. You have a great way of clarifying complexity.
  • Sharon Secor's picture
    Sharon Secor 49 weeks 5 days ago Page Paul Hein
    Excellent! I'm adding it to my children's reading list for next week.   Best Regards...
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 49 weeks 5 days ago Page Paul Hein
    "the failure to recognize it among so many people in our society" Oh, I definitely agree with that - it is maddening. But I still don't think of it as slavery, since real slaves, from what I have read, were acutely aware of their condition (read the life of Frederick Douglass for example). It's almost as if the people you describe are on narcotics, blithely unaware of reality, sleepwalking. Here's an article that describes more or less where I am coming from, just posted here on STR. http://betabeat.com/2014/02/outrage-porn-how-the-need-for-perpetual-indi... We have this giant information pipe, the Internet, funneling vast gobs of information (of varying quality) into our brains, but what should be more important to us is the local stuff, what we run into every day in our *actions*. Are we really going to pay a fee and get a permit to replace a damn toilet? Is that particular cop in our own town a bastard? And so forth.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 49 weeks 5 days ago Web link Sharon Secor
    An excellent article. Everyone should read it.
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 49 weeks 6 days ago Page Paul Hein
    Thanks, Paul. Those are all good quotes. I do have to agree that on some days I do not feel like a slave either. On others, however, I feel the full weight of the imposition of government, and perhaps even more daunting, the failure to recognize it among so many people in our society. There is that wonderful book by Milton Mayer, entutledd They Thought They Were Free, about life in Nazi Germany. In many ways, it supports your thesis Because as we sink gradually into the swamp, we lose our sense of what it was like without the swamp in our very nostrils!
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 49 weeks 6 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    For some reason, Oklahoma is kinda weird about guns. In Oregon it is commonplace for legislators and ordinary peons to carry guns in the capitol building.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 49 weeks 6 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Good article, although the author for some reason assumes that there can be such a thing as a legitimate government.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 49 weeks 6 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Well, if we've ever paid a federal income tax, he's already seized some assets. Anyway he's already given himself permission to kill anybody he pleases. I guess I am not going to worry too much about this. I won't keep my trap shut about any damn war either.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 49 weeks 6 days ago Page Paul Hein
    Assange, Snowden and Manning angered powerful and evil men. That is the way to describe them, rather than calling them slaves. I tend to use the word "peon" a lot, to describe our status. I think it is more accurate. There is a tendency to suggest that a single restriction is enough to transform us from free to slave. Although I definitely think that the time to rebel is not when the thousandth restriction is imposed, but when the first is imposed, I still can't look at that as slavery. It is an imposition. Here is a quote I like, by John Dickenson: "Indeed nations, in general, are not apt to think until they feel; and therefore nations in general have lost their liberty: For as violations of the rights of the governed, are commonly...but small at the beginning, they spread over the multitude in such a manner, as to touch individuals but slightly. Thus they are disregarded...They regularly increase the first injuries, till at length the inattentive people are compelled to perceive the heaviness of their burdens. They begin to complain and inquire - but too late. They find their oppressors so strengthened by success, and themselves so entangled in examples of express authority on the part of their rulers, and of tacit recognition on their own part, that they are quite confounded." Of course to be (involuntarily) governed at all is itself a huge imposition. Dickenson was no anarchist, but he makes a point. The time to fight an imposition is at the beginning, ideally. Of course for us, that is a rather theoretical situation. I don't know, I just don't feel like a slave; maybe I'm just being stupid. But here's another way of looking at it: http://strike-the-root.com/government-force-of-nature
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 49 weeks 6 days ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    Sharon, thank you for writing and sharing your experiences with your own children. When I think of contemporary events and look for an answer to the question, Why? I am reminded of what Butler Shaffer writes in his books--and more particularly in Wizards of Ozymandias:   The state owes its very existence to the success it has in fostering division among us. Divide and conquer has long been its mainstay in political strategy. Blacks and whites. Christians and Muslims. Employees and employers. Straights and gays. Men and women. In this separation, the state gains power by exploiting fears and promising its protection.   Taking Butler's lead, we can take it a bit further. The government is always ready to launch a new war to stampede us into fearful obedience, subservience, and worship of the state. As George Orwell showed in his novel, 1984, there will always be a Bernstein to serve as an "official enemy" for us to officially hate and fear. The list of these enemies is long and grows longer each day: A war on drugs. War on poverty. On terror. Intolerance. Child slavery. Skateboarders run amuk. Guns. Lack of "healthcare access." Saturated fats. Goldstein. Goldstein. Goldstein!
  • Sharon Secor's picture
    Sharon Secor 49 weeks 6 days ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    The concept of calling things what they are is one I've been discussing with my children and other people on a regular basis for years now. I encourage the use of very plain, simple language because it brings the message home so much more powerfully. Euphemisms, big words, and pretty language muddy the waters, hide what things are in many cases. Calling things what they are brings clarity to any situation and helps a person to see situations and people for what they are. It is a valuable tool in establishing personal and political values, as well as for decision making in difficult situations.   I stumbled onto the concept years ago, answering questions for my children when they were little. Explaining racism and slavery to a 4-year-old, using words small enough for her to understand, I wept... the small words made it all so raw, so ugly. (No, sweetheart, those children never saw their mommies again...) That child remembers Martin Luther King Day more, I suspect, because it was the first time she'd seen her mother cry than the for actual historical significance of the day.   Simple words reveal the essence of a person. What kind of person chooses to work in a position in which he or she violates the rights of others? What kind of people join professions and inflict pain and humiliation upon others while violating their rights or protect those in their profession that do? Our political "leaders" are murderers (often mass murderers), thieves, and liars. What rational, moral person would feel an obligation of loyalty or obedience to such people or their laws?   Often people ask me what I mean with the phrase/title "Practicing Resistance and Raising Revolutionaries." Teaching the next generation to see things clearly and call them what they are, to resist having their vision and intellect clouded by truth-masking euphemism and propaganda -- I believe these to be among the most important revolutionary acts a person can perform.   Best Regards,   Sharon Secor  
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 50 weeks 22 min ago
    M for Malaysia
    Blog entry Jim Davies
    Now that the Feds (alleging help from Rolls Royce) have declared that MH 370 left Malaysia in controlled flight heading West, that ass of a Prime Minister has laid the blame on the pilot(s).   That's my first pick too, and has been since Tuesday; but he made no mention of the other possibility - that it was hijacked. If hijackers got through his government's security net, he would be to blame; whereas pilot integrity is mainly an airline responsibility.   What a creep! These government morons perform no useful function at all.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 50 weeks 35 min ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Psst! Hey, Vlad, trade in Bitcoin!
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 50 weeks 11 hours ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    Sorry, Paul. I must have been mistaken.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 50 weeks 21 hours ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    Wow, Lawrence, I sure don't know how you got that from my story. I'm not advocating anything of the sort. It's just an anecdote, from 1980 when I hadn't even heard of libertarianism. But even with this imperfect example, it's clear the (entirely) free market would be just as capable of providing security. Not only was this not an example of a uniformly applied government solution, but I'm now someone who does not fly at all, which is arguably better than what you've come up with. If everybody did what I do, TSA would be ended instantly. If everybody did what you do, it wouldn't put a crimp in the TSA at all.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 50 weeks 21 hours ago
    M for Malaysia
    Blog entry Jim Davies
    This morning's news shows that the Malaysian investigators are beginning to follow that lead which I gave three days ago - they are searching the Captain's home, and may soon check that of the co-pilot.   They are still looking all over the world, however, instead of checking Mecca first. Of course I could be wrong about that, but once one understands a bit about governments and religions, it tells one where to look first.
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 50 weeks 1 day ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    As late as the 1970s, people boarded flights at LaGuardia Airport with rifles.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 50 weeks 2 days ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    "airlines were forbidden to enact their own security measures without the blessings of big government."   In the coming free society each airline will of course be free to make whatever safety regulations it wishes, so that the market can express its preferences. Soon after 9/11 I wrote this column, including the suggestion that on entering a plane the host(ess) might say "Welcome aboard! Would you care to borrow a loaded handgun for the flight?"
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 50 weeks 2 days ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    Paul: As I am sure that you will concede, there is a difference between being able to choose to fly with one air carrier as opposed to another and being forced to undergo the molestations of the TSA without any choice. Surely you will recall that airlines were forbidden to enact their own security measures without the blessings of big government. That is how all of this began because of the failure of government control. So it is not quite honest to compare the actions of the government's tax subsidized coercive monopoly and the actions of a competitive marketplace. You have had the opportunity to tell stories about your need to be touched by another human being, even if it was a molestation in an airport. I think that it would be a mistake to try to determine policy for everyone else on the planet because of your needs.
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 50 weeks 2 days ago Page Paul Hein
    Paul, perhaps you just were not very effective in communicating your displeasure about previous presidents. Here are two facts of history. First, Julian Assange is an effective prisoner because he was very effective. Second, Edward Snowdon is also an effective prisoner because he, too, was very effective in letting the powers that be tell about themselves. And a third fact that we can too easily forget. Bradley Manning is in prison because he also was very effective. I recall that when I was in a seminar in graduate school, the president of the Pontifical Institute once said to the class that he was not sure that we were any less serfs or slaves then the medieval peasants. He did not think that he was exaggerating. Slavery and serfdom are all very indistinct concepts. One bleeds off into another. They are complex, and they have multiple dimensions. Let's try not to simplify them too much by basing them up on our limited experience. What is the point of all this? It does not always come down to our own personal experience. The world is much bigger than that.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 50 weeks 2 days ago Page Paul Hein
    Eh, I'll throw in a discordant note, as usual. This kind of piece is OK for libertarians, but I'm guessing it's "a bridge too far" for everybody else, just like Molyneux calling us farm animals. It's just not going to make the sale. It's one thing to say "this looks like slavery" or "this approaches slavery in some respects", another thing entirely to say "this is slavery" or "we are slaves". Beyond the selling points, there are some factual problems. 19th century slaves could indeed sing and dance - until the overseer told them to stop. Buying homes, I don't see how that can be considered slavery in any way. And I have routinely, harshly criticized about every president I was aware of, with no ill effects but with more likely a pat on the back.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 50 weeks 2 days ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    I don't fly any more, for exactly this reason. I have an anecdote I wrote down earlier though: -------------------- Back in 1980, I was working for the French office of an American computer company, and this office covered not only France but also much of Europe and the Middle East. At the time I was in “customer service”, not only installing machines but often fixing them on the spot by troubleshooting them down to the component level with an oscilloscope or logic analyzer - no board swapping for us. One time I had to fly to Tel Aviv to install a machine. El Al flew out of Orly Airport which was near where I was living, south of Paris. When I got there I found that check-in was in the basement; if any Palestinian wanted to blow himself up along with some El Al passengers, he didn’t need to be on a plane to do it, so the airport manager put them downstairs to minimize the damage if that happened. Of course such considerations remain beyond the ken of our stalwart TSA “protectors”. Part of the boarding procedure was a pat-down, my first ever. I went inside a curtained-off area and some Israeli Army private did the deed. It never occurred to me to protest or to be annoyed about it, not only because it seemed a reasonable precaution, given the times; but also because she was an absolute knockout, one of those black-haired, olive-skinned Sephardic beauties. In fact, by the time I left the curtains, I was smiling. No, no, she was quite proper about it; the smile was my imagination at work! Unlike what the TSA does today, I never got the impression that there was some hidden agenda behind the whole thing. It was just what it appeared to be, and I actually did feel safer because of the El Al and Orly Airport procedures. I didn’t get the feeling that the procedures were done for pointless political considerations, nor that it was done for the financial benefit of some ruling class crony, nor that the idea was to create yet another constituency of loyal feeders at the government trough, or make-work for mental defectives and perverts. I didn’t get the impression the whole exercise was an example of animal training, whereby the rulers train the peons to let their minions lay hands on them for no good reason at all - in fact in Israeli society the very last thing they want is a passive populace, and it is commonplace there to see reservists walking around with M16‘s on their back, waiting for a bus, for example.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 50 weeks 2 days ago Web link Westernerd
    Excellent! We need more shunning of brutal thugs.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 50 weeks 2 days ago Web link Westernerd
    I have submitted a critique of this article to STR.
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 50 weeks 2 days ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    Jim, I like the fact that you like to have a good time over this stuff. A good sense of humor is going to help us get through this.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 50 weeks 3 days ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    “dang it, your right, I quit.”   Marvelous! That's actual progress.
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 50 weeks 3 days ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    I was happy to receive the following two posts from readers who emailed me personally. I thought their experiences were well worth sharing!   WRITER #1 Dear Lawrence: Thank you for your suggestions for dealing with the TSA.  If people weren't such sheep, if they opted out in large numbers, this nonsense would stop.   Anyway, being a clergyman, I always travel in my clerical black attire with a collar.  I like wearing dress shoes and a jacket.  They always looked so stunned when I opt out.   When they ask me if there are any parts of my body that are senstive, I always replay in a deadpan: my testicles.  That's not what they expect the priest to say.  What I would really like to do on those occasions when I can't get out of flying would be to memorize a litany of biological terms for every part of the genital/rectal anatomy and rattle it off in reply. The last time I was gate-raped, I took the opportunity to give a mini-lecture on the 4th Amendment.  I engaged my molester with a lot of questions about the 4th.  He didn't know much about it.  I also told him this was security theater as the last time I flew, the TSA had no trouble finding my testicles but missed the Swiss Army knife in my carry on.     On one occasion, when the blue-glove had me in the crucified position, I saw many people looking on in disgust to see a cruciform clergyman being felt up.  This was during the election campaign, so I mouthed "Vote For Ron Paul" as people looked on in disgust.  When the ordeal was over, my wife could still see me from the other side, and I gave a fist pump in defiance.  I kind of thought I was in for more attention, but I wasn't.   On one occasion, they tried very hard to convince me to walk through the porno scanner, kind of a hard-sell.  I called them on it and asked them why they were trying so hard to make me change my mind, as though they were trying to intimidate me, and asked them whether or not it was my right to opt out.  I further explained that I found their behavior very odd, that they would try to make me surrender my rights.  They backpedaled in a hurry.  On that occasion, they were keeping a log of the number of "opt outs."  There were only like three all day.  Sad. Anyway, just a few thoughts.  I really appreciate your suggestions, especially keeping a few Becky Akers articles at the ready!  Great idea!   For liberty, Reverend X from Lousiana   ------------------------ WRITER #2   One commenter tried to capitalize on a presumed homophobia among TSA cultists:   Some of my favorite moments:   One of my co-workers at Indianapolis Airport when asked if he any questions before his molestation said – “yes, are you gay?”  TSA “I don’t have to answer that” My Friend “Well, I am noticing, women are patting down women, men are patting down men, so there must be a prurient interest in this, so I think I have the right to ask if you are gay.”  He told us to just leave.    New Hampshire – Before I was to be molested TSA asked “how are you today” ME:  “Oh it’s another great day in the land of the free, pretending that the fourth Amendment doesn’t exist” – I’ll be damned, TSA boy guy freezes, and says “dang it, your right, I quit.”  He left, I got my stuff, America got freer.   But my proudest moment was flying out of Spokane, a priest in an ephod went through the scanner, but they still put him in the molestation line, and I’m in line behind him.  This poor young priest is getting felt up by TSA idiot – and I said in my just loud enough to be over heard voice “You know, when you are done with this, you should go to Mexico, become a male prostitute and perform fellatio 5 or 6 times a day.  After about a year, possibly your self-esteem will be high enough for you to work at Wal-Mart as a greeter.”  TSA genius looks at me and asks “what’s fellatio”  the whole room laughed their asses off.    The concluding remark? "No, government groping does not make me feel safer.  Armed pilots on the other hand…”  
  • Emmett Harris's picture
    Emmett Harris 50 weeks 3 days ago Web link Emmett Harris
    Exactly.
  • rita's picture
    rita 50 weeks 4 days ago Web link Emmett Harris
    Because people who have lived outside the law most of their adult lives are going to line up, hats in hands, and ask "pretty please" to get the drugs they want. And we all KNOW there's no black market in prescription drugs, right? Oh, wait -- here's an idea -- why not let GROWN-UPS decide for THEMSELVES what substances to put into their own bodies?
  • Thunderbolt's picture
    Thunderbolt 50 weeks 5 days ago
    A Threat to the Dollar
    Blog entry Jim Davies
    Amen, Jim. Also, what fun it would be if Amerikans also substituted Bitcoin for the dollar in both domestic and international trade!
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 50 weeks 5 days ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    Sorry but I believe this is all a conspiracy whose effect will collapse the U.S. thrusting this Nation into a broken down 3rd world country and Russia will dominate the world as the U.S. once did. The crux is "Why should any one nation rule over the rest of the world?"
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 50 weeks 6 days ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    Hello, Bradley. Thank you for explaining. Yes, I can now see that I misinterpreted you. I apologize. I think that's my problem is that whenever I turn on the radio to get a weather report, I hear all of this talk about the poor underpaid heroes military, and whenever I see that word I immediately fill in the blanks If there is any other word located next to it that seems to indicate that train of thought. Again, my apologies.
  • ReverendDraco's picture
    ReverendDraco 51 weeks 12 hours ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    "If all of these news source have the story completely wrong it's scary to think about how much else we read is wrong." It would only be scary if it were a novel idea. . . but it's so ubiquitous as to be more pathetic than scary.
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 51 weeks 13 hours ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    How new is that?
  • Bradley Keyes's picture
    Bradley Keyes 51 weeks 20 hours ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    I believe you've misinterpreted the posting. The majority of it is simply recent history which few seem to know about but certainly is important I trying to understand the situation. My observation at the end was intended to point out  that they gave up almost all options for self defense in return for promises from the US and Russia to respect their borders. They have now become a pawn with limited options for any hope of self determination. Sorry I was not clearer.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 51 weeks 1 day ago
    A Threat to the Dollar
    Blog entry Jim Davies
    What fun it would be if Russia substituted Bitcoin for the Dollar in international trade.