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  • Paul's picture
    Paul 27 weeks 3 hours ago
    Vandals
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    "To begin, for certain, any society will have its share of indiscriminate malefactors – and teenagers blowing off steam on holiday break from the government indoctrination centers (publick skools) they’re forced to regularly attend are one kind we’re for the time being saddled with." In a free society there are no publick skools. This will take care of most of the problem right there, since I've mostly gotten my mailbox bashed the night after skool let out. I disagree there is no other recourse. I have frequently just hammered the box back in shape, and simply not worried about it otherwise. Some folks weld up heavy duty boxes that can't be bent by a 2x4. Some weld up steel frames around regular boxes. Some make the connection to the ground an intentional break-away so you simply pick the little-damaged box back up and position it again. And you could rig up a camera with a flash to take pictures of license plates, or infrared game cameras. All of these work better than getting govco involved. Hey, kids are stupid. I still remember when I was one. ;-) Your story reminds me a bit about a somewhat similar episode, recounted here: http://www.ncc-1776.org/tle2009/tle502-20090118-03.html We don't know how things would work for these kinds of irritations in a free society. The bar is low, though. Most likely things would work better than they do now.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 27 weeks 3 hours ago Page Paul Bonneau
    Heh... Yeah, you have a point. Similar to the apparent conflict I noted between social pressure (aka shunning) and MYOB. I suppose "everything in moderation" is the answer. One does not normally respond with either shunning or MYOB to every provocation. Neither is very pleasant, and both come with costs. But I think, both will be needed and used in a free society. Standing on a soapbox and holding forth, as we do here on STR, probably doesn't rise to the level of invocating MYOB anyway. One can more easily and simply, walk away.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 27 weeks 10 hours ago
    Vandals
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    Hi Jim -- Happy 2014!  I'm already a couple of steps ahead of you, and have done precisely as you suggest with the red flag.  I have even used it once, to mail my 2014 Gun Owners of America members' survey.    There was contained therein, regrettably, no proposed move to arm mailboxes.  :-)
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 27 weeks 11 hours ago Web link A. Magnus
    They're back to this again?  Ten years ago it was the same refrain.  Beyond ridiculous.
  • Thunderbolt's picture
    Thunderbolt 27 weeks 12 hours ago
    Vandals
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    This reminds me of the burglary episode near where I live. I had seen the perp, although did not realize what he was doing at the time. I was interviewed by two policemen and three detectives, who knew the likely individual, but were unable to find sufficient evidence. A thousand dollars of office equipment had been stolen from the politically-connected victim of the burglary. Presuming salaries (stolen at gunpoint) of about $3000/month for each of my intervewers, I calculated the theft of an additional 15K. Eliminate government, indeed!
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 27 weeks 15 hours ago
    Vandals
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    Commiserations, Alex; what a rotten way to welcome you to the neighborhood. Those yobs make up the population pool from which policemen are recruited.   Congrats though on getting a dog. He or she is one fortunate pooch.   Your antepenultimate paragraph is the kicker. Infuriating though such vandalism seems, it's nothing compared to the wreckage government causes. This damage you have already mostly repaired with a hammer; application of a nut, bolt, and a pair of washers may take care of the red flag. Try using a hammer on a b-rat.
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 27 weeks 19 hours ago
    Vandals
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    O.K. Alex. Mybe I should have read your article first before pronouncing my previous judgement. My mail box has been vandalized by drunk teens also. Living in the country is one of the hazards, however, mine could not be battered in with a baseball bat. It had to be blown up with a pipe bomb. Sheriffs department investigated to no avail, especially since bombing of U.S. Mail boxes is a felony offense. Twice has my mail box been blown up. The most recent, a piece of iron pipe 8 inches in diameter. The box is fine but the hinge was blown completely off. I see many boxes now protected by a dual 4x4 post with 2x6 slats making it difficult for drunk teens to bat a box.This is my fourth mail box in about 30 years. Once I found a dead, skinned out raccoon in my box. Think you are enjoying your mail experience wait a few more years. Ha! Don't ever expect authorities to do their "protect and serve bit". Goo luck.
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 27 weeks 19 hours ago
    Vandals
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    I fully and strongly agree with you Alex on this point. How about Hilliary Clinton being voted most popular woman in America for the 12th consecutive year, according to a Reuters poll. God Bless America, and Goddamned the American Government. I just recently closed on a home, and I was nauseated by all the rules and regulations and charges. 8 and 3/4 percent of the value in a closing tax on the home. among other stateist dream laws, rules, regulations and etc that a home owner must pay just to by a house. That tax is higher than the state tax itself. What's up with that.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 27 weeks 1 day ago
    Vandals
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    Reverend:  Well, if you want to talk constitutionalism, last I looked at that piece of parchment it only talks about the establishment of post offices and post roads.  It says nothing about maintaining such (as in "to establish and maintain a Navy"), and when was the last time the USPS repaired or paved a road?   Fact is, as Spooner so sagely pointed out, constitutions are all bunk.  Pieces of paper don't limit or govern psychopaths.
  • ReverendDraco's picture
    ReverendDraco 27 weeks 1 day ago
    Vandals
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    The sad thing is, Postal Service is one of the few jobs delegated to the Feds in the Constitution. . . even sadder, is that they spend more time, effort, and yours (and my) money on things which have *not* been delegated, or even which have been delegated or reserved to State and/or Local governments. . . than they do on those things for which the Feds *do* have a mandate. Burn it down.
  • Tom S's picture
    Tom S 27 weeks 1 day ago Page Paul Bonneau
    MYOB seems to apply to male genital mutilation just fine.
  • Don Stacy's picture
    Don Stacy 27 weeks 1 day ago Blog entry Don Stacy
    Thanks for the introduction to Walter Williams's book on this theme.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 27 weeks 1 day ago Blog entry Don Stacy
    A good one, Don. How, indeed, can the free market be confused with a system of government rules about racial segregation?   Even if Marx invented the term so as to discredit it, I still think "capitalism" is a useful shorthand for the practice of saving money (postponing consumption) so as to grow a business. But like many terms including "liberal" it's sadly necessary to define them when putting them to use.   Walter Williams wrote a good book on this theme a few years back: South Africa's War Against Capitalism.
  • ReverendDraco's picture
    ReverendDraco 27 weeks 2 days ago Web link Sharon Secor
    It was close. It did show the area where I now live - but not where I was born/raised. Weird.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 27 weeks 3 days ago Page Paul Bonneau
    One of your better -- best -- presentations, Paul. But tell me this: where would STR go if all of us would abruptly decide to adhere to the MYOB principle? Scary, is it not? Sam
  • John deLaubenfels's picture
    John deLaubenfels 27 weeks 4 days ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    Let's not get too excited.  This is a small step in the right direction.  A VERY small step.  What the government of Uruguay is NOT saying is, "It's none of our business what you put into your own body, or where you get it, as long as you've done so peacefully."  No, they're saying, "We're graciously allowing you to smoke pot, as long as you pay all the prescribed tributes to your rulers."  Fuck them!
  • Thunderbolt's picture
    Thunderbolt 27 weeks 5 days ago Page Paul Bonneau
    MYOB sounds good to me, Paul. The NAP often has to be explained. Everyone immediately knows Mind Your Own Business. Since nearly everyone despises cops, I am surprised that they are not shunned in businesses such as restaurants. I presume they would extract revenge in the form of tickets and harassment.
  • rita's picture
    rita 27 weeks 5 days ago
    Where?
    Page Paul Hein
    Actually, you can't buy whatever you want, either.
  • mkghandi's picture
    mkghandi 27 weeks 5 days ago Page Paul Bonneau
    NAP, I assume, stands for Non Aggression Principle. MYOB is a meaningless concept to collectivists, and authoritarians. So is NAP. The same as absence of empathy is to a sociopath. Because these people do not understand these concepts, the only exceptions to such principles is to punish those who violate them, and to reward those who honor such principles. They will of course complain (hypocritically) that such discipline is aggression. Fortunately, (or maybe unfortunately) the only people who need to be impressed with this discipline are those who hold power.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 27 weeks 5 days ago
    Where?
    Page Paul Hein
    You nailed it, Paul. With a deal of trouble it's possible to reduce the impact of government, but ultimately the only way one can exercise one's inherent sovereignty is to abolish it. And in my opinion, America is a pretty good place to start doing that.   One way, meanwhile, to reduce its impact is that of the Perpetual Tourist (PT also stands for Previous Taxpayer and other good things.)   The idea is to establish a domicile for tax purposes in a country where income tax is low or zero, while doing business in another where corporate taxes are low or zero, and living most of the year in a third where the climate is favorable. Or something like that. Wiki has more.
  • Thunderbolt's picture
    Thunderbolt 27 weeks 5 days ago
    Where?
    Page Paul Hein
    Dr. Hein: I too have wondered the same thing. Where can one go? I have even considered seasteading or living on a sailboat. Maybe a blimp would work. Both would be very vulnerable to statist thugs, however.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 27 weeks 5 days ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    "Bupkis." In this context, of what the Not So Amazing ones have actually accomplished, perhaps that should be the Word of the Year 2013. Thank you, Lawrence; it's a new one to me. We learn something every day.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 27 weeks 5 days ago Page Glen Allport
    Clearly, I'm going to have to see the Lone Ranger. My education would be otherwise incomplete. Thank you, Glen.   And for all you Johnny Depp fans, don't miss Chocolat. It's delicious.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 27 weeks 5 days ago Page Jim Davies
    At a similar meeting in 1996 I had the pleasure of seeing Harry and Irwin side he by side. The former had just promised to end the i-tax if elected, and the latter handed him a copy of the Internal Revenue Code and asked which law he would repeal, so as to do that.   Harry put on his best Brer Rabbit smile, but couldn't answer; there isn't one.   But he had the last... laugh. They can and do cage people without such a law.
  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 27 weeks 5 days ago Page Glen Allport
    Mark, I agree that most movie critics are liberal statists, and I think it offends them when non-PC truths and positive views of freedom are portrayed on film. And I think both the critics and the public generally felt uncomfortable, even if only vaguely and mostly unconsciously, with the two underlying themes in The Lone Ranger. Growing up and well into my own adulthood, it really didn't consciously occur to me that white Americans had actually murdered most of the Indian population during the late 1700s and throughout the 1800s. We did, though, and I think with books like 1491 and other material out there on the topic, the truth is seeping into public awareness just a bit more than previously. An entertaining movie can probably survive one horrible truth, but TWO may be one too many. 
  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 27 weeks 5 days ago Page Glen Allport
    Good points, Paul, and thanks for "Hell on Wheels." No, I haven't seen it, and if it's half as solid as Firefly -- one of my favorites -- I'm sure I'll enjoy it.
  • Thunderbolt's picture
    Thunderbolt 27 weeks 6 days ago Page Jim Davies
    Thank you, Alex. I agree that Harry Browne was very careful about what he said regarding income tax. He was aware that people who fight on legal issues always lose: fifth amendment, voluntary tax, and so forth. The judges, cops, prosecutors and even god are all part of the conspiracy to take your money at gunpoint (God has lately become a libertarian). I was all the more stunned to find Harry saying that there are legal ways to avoid income tax, found embedded within the tax code, but he was deliberately vague on the issue. (Cannot find the quote, yet). I have a friend who has never paid income tax, since she did what I suggested could be done: structured all her financial affairs as loans. She has been audited, and always passed. Banks and governments lend money, knowing that they will never be paid back. That is not the intent. Acquiring assets and influence might well be. Borrowing and lending money is, on a personal level, entirely legal and voluntary for both parties. Each must be careful to document what he is doing. Video and attorneys might be a good idea, as well. Nonetheless, interest-free loans are neither reportable nor taxable. Surprisingly, the mafia appears to be afraid of fighting on this issue, since it is meat-and-potatoes for their own strategies. If you let your imagination run a little, you can see where bitcoins in a dark wallet might mesh nicely with this concept. Banks become an unnecessary road hazard. The subtle difference between getting paid and receiving a loan is very powerful. Both are legal. One is taxable.
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 27 weeks 6 days ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    Yes, it does leave a great opportunity for ridiculing Obama, now that you mention it. Do you think it will ever reach the proportions of Al Gore's "invention" of the Internet or of Dubya's WMDs or his hilarious "fool me once..." gaff?
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 27 weeks 6 days ago Page Jim Davies
    Thanks for the article, Jim. This reminds me of years ago when there was a Libertarian presidential candidate called Jim Burns. Do you remember him? He to went to jail for fighting the tax. I wrote to him when he was in jail, and I inserted a bunch of stamps so that he could write back to me and to anyone else he took a mind to. The jail confiscated those stamps as contraband. Can you imagine? I'm glad that this idea is getting out, and as the government acts more insanely by the day, mor and more people will come on to this truth. There will come a point when everyone is disgusted and refuses to cooperate with government any longer, and I don't want to be the last person paying taxes do you?
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 27 weeks 6 days ago Page Jim Davies
    Thunderbolt:  Harry Browne emphatically denied the absence of any income tax law, and I personally and publicly confronted him about it in Nashua, NH during his 2000 presidential run.  If he changed his mind about it later on, I was unaware.  For what it's worth, I think in his heart of hearts he knew, but saw no benefit in openly acknowledging it.  Sad.  But otherwise he was a great man, a great mind and writer, and did truly believe in liberty.
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 27 weeks 6 days ago Page Glen Allport
    Good take Glen and I wondered the same thing about the critics panning this movie.  I thought perhaps that  too many critics are simply tired of yet another loopy Johnny Depp character, but I thought this was a brilliant adaptation and performance. I also considered perhaps Americans no longer go for westerns unless they involve mean, dirty, cruel men having massive gun fights in slow motion only to be saved by agents of the state bringing "civilization" to the inwashed.  However, I think that you may have hit the nail on the head, as audiences seem to like it better than critics: it makes the critic weenies uncomfortable on the two related subjects of mass genocide and corporate-state malfeasance.  Most movie critics are liberal statists who have long hated westerns, especially when they glorify the "rugged individualist" and show corporate-state minions as the bad guys they were, and are.
  • Emmett Harris's picture
    Emmett Harris 27 weeks 6 days ago Web link Emmett Harris
    Exactly.  As with the Colt when facing individual rogues, the AK (and weapons like it) help to equalize the playing field against militarized states.
  • Emmett Harris's picture
    Emmett Harris 27 weeks 6 days ago Web link Emmett Harris
    Indeed.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 27 weeks 6 days ago Web link Emmett Harris
    I don't know... I can't think of one thing, except possibly invention of the Internet (thanks Al Gore!) that helps freedom more than the invention of personal military rifles. Kalashnikov is a saint, along with John Moses Browning.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 27 weeks 6 days ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    "on the other, we have bizarre and phantasmagoric events such as Obama receiving the Nobel Prize" And think of what a great gift that was, such a juicy target for ridicule. On net, I bet the ruling class now wishes they hadn't rigged the game for Obombya to receive that prize...
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 27 weeks 6 days ago Page Glen Allport
    "but I don't understand if you're contesting that or just don't feel it would be a reason for many people to be unhappy with the film." No, I'm not contesting that (my comment about "fascist history" wasn't very clear, I guess). The film could allude to the true historical reality - in fact, I think it pretty much did that - but still have so many flaws as to turn people off, even if they agreed with that allusion. In other words, I don't equate widespread rejection of the film, with acceptance of the government school historical narrative. Yeah, I know, blockbusters aren't that realistic anyway, but I still think they have to have some connection to reality - if not so much to the laws of physics, then at least to the motivations of the players. For some reason, I'm much more forgiving of the violations of the former than of the latter, and I suspect that is true for others as well. After all, 2/3 of all films made seem to invoke the supernatural, zombies or vampires - yet we still watch the silly things. The best treatment of early railroad practices and corruption I think is the series, "Hell on Wheels". If you haven't seen it, take a look. I put it close to Firefly in quality, and the acting is superb.
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 28 weeks 13 hours ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    Thunderbolt, I have to admit your analysis has quite a bit in it to chew on. The ascendancy of the United States to a role as sole superpower has proven Lord Acton's assessment that power corrupts and absolute power tends to corrupt absolutely.
  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 28 weeks 18 hours ago Page Glen Allport
    Hi Paul -- I'm not sure what to make of your comment about "fascist 'history'" -- I'm pretty sure we actually killed off most of the Indians (something sure did) and corporatism at the federal level DID take a huge step forward with "regulation" of the railroads at about the time this story was set, but I don't understand if you're contesting that or just don't feel it would be a reason for many people to be unhappy with the film. Either way, I'll agree with you that there are plenty of other reasons people might not like a particular film, inclluding this one. The "nobody would act that way" line is crossed repeatedly in every summer blockbuster and would-be blockbuster; think of any of the Batman movies, for instance -- or for that matter Avatar, one of the highest-grossing films in history, and in which behavior, including combat tactics, often makes no sense other than to move the story along as the director wants it to go. Again, people like or don't like a film for any number of reasons, and I know that plenty of people just felt, as you did, that Lone Ranger is a so-so film. I personally LIKED the film and especially much of the acting but my growing and originally mostly unconscious discomfort about the underlying horrors of the story really came to a head after seeing it a second time when I watched it at home. I do wonder how many people felt a similar discomfort and whether that discomfort played a role in people's views (and reviews) of the movie. Perhaps I should have expanded on my thesis but I wanted this one to be short. I certainly agree with you about Depp's character -- he's terrific in the role, and Tonto is more solid and nuanced than the loopy, lightweight drunk he brings to life in the "Pirates" films.
  • Thunderbolt's picture
    Thunderbolt 28 weeks 23 hours ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    I have been thinking that the Russians should step in to protect Iran. Possibly even China should step up to the plate. The Israelis clearly have a madman at the helm, who will have his war, no matter what anyone thinks. How the hell did these people gain control of the U.S. government!!!! I presume the NSA can confirm that the Israelis are bribing U.S. congressmen with the billions of dollars of aid that we send to them annually. History suggests that anyone not having nukes will be invaded, and at least a few states have noticed.
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 28 weeks 1 day ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    Glock: Yes, may there be many more Snowdens, and yes, these truth-tellers should be recognized as heros. Like you, I roll between disgust and hope: on one hand we have the brave Bradley (Chelsea) Manning and Edward Snowden (there are more), and on the other, we have bizarre and phantasmagoric events such as Obama receiving the Nobel Prize--another example of the Dodo "prizes" as cited above from Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Does he really have no sense of shame? And why does the public not turn its back to him whenever he enters a room? And the crazy Marie Antoinette Michelle Obama! Enough said there. It really is an upside-down world, isn't it? But the limits of this farce are rapidly approaching--on all fronts. I wonder if the Syria scenario can play out again with regard to Iran and if Americans will act like adults and stop this attempt to once again demonize that longsuffering populace. The chickenhawk neo-cons (in both parties) cannot get more insane as they yet again try to deep-six the possibility of normalized relations with Iran, whose real (but unacknowledged) "sin" is that it dared to spurn the useless Fed-created pseudo-money by daring to suggest an alternative"world currency" in payment for oil (bitcoin or one of its manumitted children?). I wonder how much longer the rabid neocons will be able to trot out that crazy fear-mongering mantra against Iran, namely that Iran is only "months away" from having a nuclear bomb. They've been using that canard for about 15 or 20 years, haven't they? I can't believe it still works on the rabid talkies and their acolytes. Is the memory hole really that big and effective in Amurrrrika? Oy vey!
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 28 weeks 1 day ago Web link Emmett Harris
    In effect this is good news. If Congress is not passing laws then it is to our benefit. All in all it might better be to have a government that does nothing than to do something to which the People would come to regret.
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 28 weeks 1 day ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    Paul: Yes, we can only hope, as Butler Shaffer would say, that the "sclerotic state" is choking on its own state of entropy. I just wish it would hurry itself along and get to the "other side" so that civilized people can once again thrive without its malign influence.
  • Thunderbolt's picture
    Thunderbolt 28 weeks 1 day ago Page Jim Davies
    Nice, indeed. I have had some experience along these lines. During the Vietnam debacle, I decided that it is immoral to fund these monsters. Eventually, they caught up with me and did the usual. I met some nice people there. I was in for 400K, but another person was there for the same period for 5K. For the short term, I suspect that working under the table for bitcoins or cash is the approach most likely to succeed. Furthermore, interest free loans are not reportable and not taxable. This is likely the target of a reference by Harry Browne that somewhere in the tax code lies the secret to legally not paying the mafia. Why not structure all your affairs as a loan? I will hand you that new Craftsman wrench to hold for thirty years as collateral for a loan of twenty dollars, subject to review or automatic renewal. Ditto for hotdogs, washing cars, flipping burgers, etc. As George Bush correctly pointed out, no document will make any difference to all the players on the take, including the judges, cops, prosecutors, and in most cases, the defense.There is no law that requires one to have employees and none that requires one be an employee. Perhaps you are in training and need a subsistence loan periodically until you are qualified to be an employee, say, in thirty years or so. Of course, I was too stupid to see that no one wins playing by traditional statist rules. One attorney told me he had not won a federal defense case in five years. Fighting in court is a waste of time. I have high hopes for Bitcoins in a Dark Wallet.
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 28 weeks 1 day ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    There should be more Snowdens. Those peons in government have the prime opportunity to unveil the corruptness of government. I have hopes there will be more who to expose the phoney secrets they hold so dearly to their hearts. I am having a terriable time between optimism and pessimism, frustration and disgust. I subscribe to a site in my state that exposes all the bills the state house and state senate bring up. At least half or more as really stupid, ideas--something that would come out of a seventh grade class. Snowden should receive special protection and a medal for the audacity to perform the task he did. He has done more for the American people than any legislature has performed.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 28 weeks 1 day ago Page Glen Allport
    Well, there are lots of reasons a movie like that might be panned, not all of them having to do with acceptance of fascist "history". For example, there is often a fine line where a plot must not cross, having to do with reality. If as a film watcher you say to yourself, "Nobody would act like that", then the film is going to be downgraded. I think this film crossed that line multiple times. It may also be that the whole thing was too formulaic. For example, it's long been common to show films sympathetic to Indians, and I don't think that is a bad thing - but portraying them as angels is going overboard and again strains credulity. It also irritates people to be preached at. Cheer up, Glen; it was just a so-so movie. I did like Depp's character though.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 28 weeks 1 day ago Page Douglas Young
    I am thrilled with zero tolerance policies. There is no better way to undermine government legitimacy; and look, they are doing it to themselves, in government schools! A lesson is indeed being taught to these children, but it's not the lesson the rulers think is being taught. Thank heaven it's not like the old days, when it appeared to school children that the government actually made some sense.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 28 weeks 1 day ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    Well Lawrence, I wouldn't be so pessimistic. Seems to me the reason those in government have so worked themselves into a frenzy is that a large and growing percentage of the peons have escaped their grade-school programming. I don't see so many ordinary people frothing at the mouth saying Snowden ought to be shot. In fact I was surprised when one of my acquaintances actually criticized him - surprised because it was so unusual. "You know: a real crime such as murder, rape, theft, fraud, or assault—the kind of things that ought to be illegal..." Or to look at it another way, the kind of things governments routinely indulge in. "I see no principled reason not to do that." A law professor and apologist for the regime, talking about principle; now there's a laugh...
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 28 weeks 1 day ago Web link Emmett Harris
    Removed double post.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 28 weeks 1 day ago Web link Emmett Harris
    As it says in the article: "Blame the Nazi Germans for making me become a gun designer," said Kalashnikov. 'I always wanted to construct agricultural machinery.' " That kinda sums it up for me. How many of the world's best engineers devote their efforts toward drone technology or missle guidance systems and the like rather than more useful practical inventions.
  • Emmett Harris's picture
    Emmett Harris 28 weeks 1 day ago Page Jim Davies
    Nice!