Recent comments

  • Peter McCandless's picture
    Peter McCandless 3 years 8 weeks ago
    Let's Get It Over With
    Page Paul Hein
    Paul, your "apology" has half the sincerity but twice the humor of what could be found on a typical episode of Monty Python.
  • Michael Kleen's picture
    Michael Kleen 3 years 8 weeks ago Web link Don Stacy
    Why on earth would conservative, big business forces want to "hijack the concept of anarchism"?
  • jd-in-georgia's picture
    jd-in-georgia 3 years 8 weeks ago
    Let's Get It Over With
    Page Paul Hein
    For any politician to make a comment on a "hatred of God" is most hypocritcal. The difference between a politician and God is that God does not believe himself to be a politician.
  • Gwardion's picture
    Gwardion 3 years 8 weeks ago Web link Don Stacy
    Probably one of the worst articles on anarchism or anarcho-capitalism that I have ever read. It was so riddled with assumptions, inaccuracies and just flat out crap, that the only thing i can use it for is an examination into the mind of an "anarchist" who doesn't understand that voluntary market exchange is the basis of anarchy. I think the guy that wrote this article needs to read the STR article put up today about the Orwellian altering of the meaning of words to displace proper political debates.
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 3 years 8 weeks ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    Thanks, golefvre. Those mind- and spirit-numbing camps are so dismal. As a school-age kid, I only had one teacher that made a connection -- and not for the reason she would have thought. She seemed to actually view us a real people.
  • golefevre's picture
    golefevre 3 years 8 weeks ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    Time to abolish compulsory schooling too! Impressive ideas Lawrence. I wish you all much success with this endeavor!
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 3 years 8 weeks ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    We're trying to "break the cycle" of statism with this approach. It fits in with Glen Allport's "Doctrine of Love and Freedom" scenario. With this approach, we're hoping for fewer "broken" children. It's time to connect the dots...
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 8 weeks ago
    Iraq's New Death Squad
    Web link Jad Davis
    And, who are the "bad guys"? Anyone who disagrees, resists or opposes, them or their master(s); "They are just like us". "Accusations of human rights abuses, killings and politically motivated arrests have surfaced, including assaults on a university president and arrests of opposition politicians."
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 8 weeks ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    They called that shut down off, partly because Anonymous hacked into BART's system. By the way, we finally have a photo of some of the members of Anonymous.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 8 weeks ago
    Natural Law
    Web link Don Stacy
    ...the natural law is fundamental to human existence... ~ C.S. Lewis According to Clive, it is the "deep magic" that everyone knows.
  • rita's picture
    rita 3 years 8 weeks ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Yawn. Johnson didn't invent anything -- the public's so-called "right to safety" has been used for years as an excuse for the systematic annihilation of both 2nd and 4th Amendment "rights." It's not a right if someone can take it away.
  • jd-in-georgia's picture
    jd-in-georgia 3 years 9 weeks ago
    Inferno, Part II of II
    Page tzo
    Tzo, As usual, your words do not promote emotion or reaction. They only promote ideas and thinking. Outstanding.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 3 years 9 weeks ago Web link Mike Powers
    Thanks, Co Op. I remember once I bartered 2 pk K ration smokes in a Korean village for a much needed Ernie Pyle hat that the supply chiefs simply couldn't get, or so they said. I was freezing my ears off (not to mention my butt) in that miserable place**, and the mama-sans saved my bacon. Best .40 I ever spent (I think a carton of smokes at the PX was around a buck -- that would be a silver buck, of course -- at the time, but I gave all my ration stamps away). Sam ** IT was not a miserable place, I should correct that. US infiltration was miserable in what was a gentle, friendly village of farm folks trying to stay out of the line of fire. I had no business being there intruding upon their way of life; and, although a draftee, I would have found a way NOT to be there had I known what I know today. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 3 years 9 weeks ago
    Ron Quixote
    Page Mark Davis
    Mark: Thanks for posting this link over at HaleBobb. Although you wrote it 4 1/2 years ago, it is perhaps more poignant today at the outset of the 2012 dog and pony show as it was in 2007. I must have been "off the air" at the time. Sam
  • cooperativesingularity's picture
    cooperativesing... 3 years 9 weeks ago Web link Mike Powers
    In WW2 a single pack of cigarettes was used for the purposes of barter. It changed hands many times with it's final purchase being a home. This seems to indicate the extremely addictive nature of tobacco as it relates to human nature.
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 3 years 9 weeks ago
    Inferno, Part II of II
    Page tzo
    This is a classic tzo. Well done!
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 3 years 9 weeks ago
    Inferno, Part II of II
    Page tzo
    Tzo: This is belated, but I've been "off the air" for a time. Your essay, particularly part II, is the best I've read. Hands down. You've put lucidity into what I've wanted to say, have tried to say, have rather clumsily said not a few times. The idea that I am not "required" to "be a citizen" -- to lend my name to the crimes of an egregious beast -- is freeing once comprehended. I'm gratified to know I do not need to emigrate away from those I love -- my family, my colleagues, my friends -- to be free. I have no need to migrate to, say Costa Rica (Inferno in the making??), nor to petition agents of state (ambassadors, consulates) for "official" permission to leave or arrive anywhere. I can declare myself a sovereign state. I can be free. Sam
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 9 weeks ago Web link Mike Powers
    KenK, there was no mention of "constitutional arguments" in that story. And, to maintain continuity of thought, you should have, in my opinion, written, "A "right" you can't exercise without being rousted isn't a right". Unfortunately, it would still have been just as untrue a statement, however; just because the bully-in-the-schoolyard is capable of taking your lunch money, does not mean that you do not have a "just claim" to it, i.e. a "right" to it. ________________________________________________________________________________________ roust ...2 informal treat roughly; harass : the detectives who had rousted him the night of the murder ~ Oxford Dictionaries
  • rita's picture
    rita 3 years 9 weeks ago Web link Mike Powers
    In a free society, certainly in a sane one, ALL drugs would be treated the same as any other commodity. Unlike most illegal drugs, tobacco really is addictive and harmful, but for decades the tobacco industry has helped to underwrite a massive campaign of false advertising against other drugs (check out the anti-meth posters at your local post office or police department), and now THEY'RE whining about THEIR freedom? They don't want THEIR relationships with THEIR customers invaded by the state? How perfect. Welcome to my world, Mr. Marlboro Man, the world YOU helped create.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 3 years 9 weeks ago Web link Mike Powers
    Amazing. It's stories like this that have persuaded me that constitutional arguments are just water treading. Sooner or later you'll get tired and sink. We have the same problem in my area with open carry. Certain sheriffs and police chiefs just don't like it even though they admit it's legal and so you get rousted for it no matter what. A "right" you can't exercise without permission isn't a right.
  • tzo's picture
    tzo 3 years 9 weeks ago Web link Mike Powers
    Maybe cigarettes as they are currently manufactured are dangerous, but maybe smoking pure tobacco is mostly harmless. http:// en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_additives_in_cigarettes (remove space in address line above)
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 3 years 9 weeks ago Web link Michael Dunn
    Suverans2: Thanks for pointing out the absurdity of KenK, the troll.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 9 weeks ago Web link Mike Powers
    And, the human beings responsible would be held accountable for adding man-made toxic chemicals, which cause harm, to their tobacco. They could not hide behind "corporation" veils.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 9 weeks ago Web link Mike Powers
    G'day rita, You may already know this, but in case you don't, you can click on the "edit" below your post and make corrections.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 9 weeks ago Web link Michael Dunn
    "He...comes across to most people as a kook whenever he opens his yap..." ~ KenK Your slip is showing, KenK. Spoken like a true collectivist. Just sayin'.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 9 weeks ago Page Glen Allport
    Thumb in the air for Paul.
  • rita's picture
    rita 3 years 9 weeks ago Web link Mike Powers
    Yeah, I know, I misspelled "government." I do that when I think faster than I type.
  • rita's picture
    rita 3 years 9 weeks ago Web link Mike Powers
    "It's incumbent upon the officer to make contact" -- and whether the contact turns into detainment depends on the circumstances encountered by the officer. It's been my observation that the people most likely to be "detained" for resisting arrest are the ones who have broken no law. Gee, I wonder why the governemt is broke.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 9 weeks ago Web link Michael Dunn
    G'day Sam, Words of wisdom, my friend.
  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 3 years 9 weeks ago Page Glen Allport
    This is an excellent bit of commentary, Paul. I believe I understand your position and certainly respect it (because it respects others, and is both intelligent and well-intentioned). I have a very unusual perspective -- meaning only that I don't know many people who share it -- and THAT, along with issues of wording, are mostly what we're talking about, in terms of differences between our views. On people being damaged: they are, that's the simple truth, and I say that plainly. I don't conceal this from them. You, Paul, are damaged. So am I. If it's easier to hear, the word "hurt" is just as accurate. People ARE hurt in early life -- if there are any exceptions to this, I don't think I have met them -- and no, for the most part, I don't think people are going to get "fixed." I certainly don't think anyone is going to get fixed or cured by reading anything I might write, because "getting cured" involves deep feeling of whatever repressed experiences someone is carrying around. The number of people willing to do that, or who even know that such a thing might be possible, is close enough to zero as to make no difference in the world as a whole. On the off-chance that anyone reading this might be interested in the idea, check out anything by Dr. Arthur Janov, starting with 1970's The Primal Scream. Janov's blog (Google it; the STR spam filter blocks almost every URL I try to add) is worth reading and is a good, bite-size-at-a-time introduction to his ideas. The basics are this: Neurosis is the repression of feeling, and the remedy is to feel. Not to talk about feelings, or come up with insight about feelings, or change your behavior, but to actually FEEL those things that were too much to feel when they happened, long ago. As I said, the number of people on the same page is, basically, zero. What people CAN do, fairly easily, is change their behavior towards pregnant women, newborns, infants, and children. You don't have to get well to do THAT. You don't have to get well to support smaller government (or no government), either. If enough people begin to understand that both freedom AND compassion are important, then they'll change their behavior accordingly, to whatever extent feels right to them (which includes whatever extent their psychological defenses allow). THAT is how the world can change for the better, even without trying to fix (most of) what's wrong with the world now, and without expecting people to get "fixed" or "cured" when, in fact, almost none of them are even interested in trying to do that. So I agree completely, Paul: it really has to come from inside. That means, to me, that future generations must be treated better than ours has been -- if so, then THEIR "insides" will be healthier, and with any luck at all, that trend will continue. We can help kick-start the process; your writing and mine, and the freedom movement in general, can help put people today in touch with the real part of themselves -- the part that knows, despite the lifetime of propaganda and repression, that both love and freedom are what every human being needs, and are what the WORLD needs if we're ever to have something better than the global tyranny being planned for us.
  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 3 years 9 weeks ago Page Glen Allport
    "People generally aren't influenced by argumentation" -- I agree, Paul, but, like you, I write anyway. One of my points is that getting a more accurate paradigm or framework into people's minds dramatically increases the chance that they will understand the world in that more accurate way; repeated exposure to the new paradigm is, however, needed. Ten or twenty years of exposure isn't uncommon before someone sees something that has been right in front of them all along; I'm thinking of people I know who were certain the drugwar was necessary despite all the data showing how harmful it is, and only after many, many exposures to the idea that ALL THAT DATA had an explanation did it pop into their heads that yes, coercion and violence against drug users and sellers might not be a good idea. "I am pretty doubtful of this notion of "damaged people"" That's what the links and references are for. Believe me, the science is overwhelming that trauma (pain, be it emotional or physical) early in life leads to unhealthy emotional, behavioral, and physical consequences. The paper on the ACE study linked in Section 7 above is reasonably short but absolutely makes the case: The Relationship of Adverse Childhood Experiences to Adult Health: Turning gold into lead. There is an ocean of other data from many sources, and it all points to this: emotional damage (much of which is caused by the State, as anyone who lost a family member in a drone attack could tell you) is [edit: among other things] a powerful tool for keeping the State in power and for molding all those unthinking (or badly thinking) supporters of the State and its demogogues. "My view is that people are generally going to stick with their worldviews until some shock breaks them out of it." Many paradigm shifts have happened without such an apparent shock (the new paradigm kinda IS the shock, really) -- the Enlightenment, Newton's laws, the germ theory -- such things changed minds because enough evidence had built up to support a change in view and the new paradigm fit the new data extremely well. This column was written to show that The Doctrine of Love and Freedom meets that criterion: it explains a large number of important facts that the paradigm of Left-Right Statism clearly does not, and which the libertarian framework itself is only partially able to explain. "Many more will come around when the empire crashes" I hope you are right, but I don't see much evidence for that in history. Russia isn't much more free now than under the Soviets -- it sure isn't anything like a libertarian oasis -- and every dictator who has toppled in recent decades, from Marcos to the Shah, has been followed by more tyranny. The faces and rhetoric change but wrecking a nation and replacing the power elite with another group of psychopaths doesn't really bring much improvement.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 3 years 9 weeks ago Web link Michael Dunn
    I emailed my kids the Jon Stewart article and clip yesterday. Theirs (and Stewart's) angst over the situation is, of course, part -- a very small part -- of the reason I would never "vote". I would never vote because voting is a violent act. I would probably vote for Dr Paul if I were forced under penalty of death to participate in the bread and circus presentation called an "election". My vote be an attempt to coerce all those who want to be subservient to agents of state to submit to Ron Paul. And to me. Under threat of violence. Under the circumstance I would need to believe that Ron Paul, if elected, could tame the beast of political authority. I don't. It would also depend upon enough of "the electorate" joining me inaugurating him gang leader. They wouldn't. But why would a sane individual get involved in this crazy making Jon Stewart so aptly pointed out? In a sense I admire Dr. Paul and my sons and daughters-in-law and grandchildren for plunging ahead in the eye of this lunacy. I would like to think they might succeed in being a major force in bringing about the collapse of state. I hope more Jon Stewarts come to see and have the cojones to report as he did the absurdity of the political frolic. If so expect to see riots and dissension sufficient to snarl the state into extinction sooner than we expect. Be prepared, however, to whet your sovereignty skills in face of what will most certainly rise up to take the place of this beast called the state. It won't be pretty, but we can survive in freedom. Yes, we can. Sam.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 3 years 9 weeks ago Page Glen Allport
    "repeated exposure to the new paradigm is, however, needed." Agreed. But the point I am trying to make is that it matters what form this exposure takes. If you look at people as damaged, even if they are, and that you are going to fix that damage, you are not going to connect with them. If you look at this as simply a marketing problem, or a question of more effective evangelism, you are not going to connect with them. I say it is better to not think of people as being damaged - instead, to think of them as a combination of their genes and their thoughts and their experiences, both good and bad. The advantage of this is that at least you can be honest with people. If instead you look at people as damaged, you have to conceal what you are about. Could you go up to someone and say, "I think you were damaged by your upbringing, but if you listen to me, I can fix this damage of yours?" Of course not, that would get you nowhere. But if that is what you are thinking to yourself, you are not being straightforward with people, are you? I went through most of my life trying to fix the world, but the world was not having any of it. And now I think I was wrong to do that. I don't want to fix the world any more; I just want to live the rest of my life as free as I can be, and ideally without fear. If others see what I am doing and decide on their own they want that too, well good. But it is not necessary that they do. I have only a very low standard for them, that they can easily meet: leave me alone. That's not to say I don't argue for freedom; obviously I do. But I do it because I enjoy it and hope others can get the point. If they don't, that's OK too. I don't think people can be voted free, or argued free either. It really has to come from inside.
  • Darkcrusade's picture
    Darkcrusade 3 years 9 weeks ago Web link Robert Kaercher
    The spook agency tying up the 'loose ends' and sanitizing the operations. Looks like they are gonna need a few more guys who will ''eat their guts and beg for seconds.'' I suppose you cannot trust the bullet stoppers to keep their mouths shut.Also they might wake up and join the right side,Can't have any rambos fighting for the otherside. Ventura does serve a purpose tho....... http://artapp.net/Jesse-Ventura's-New-B ... t-....html Among the 25 U.S. special operations forces killed in Wardak province were 22 Navy SEALS, considered to be the "best of the best." Seven Afghan troops also died. http://www.cnn.com/2011/WORLD/asiapcf/0 ... ?hpt=hp_t1 The majority of the Navy SEALs who died belonged to the same covert unit that conducted the raid that killed Osama bin Laden in May, though they were not the same men, the military official said. The troops died during a "quick reaction" mission to assist military personnel pinned down by insurgents in a fierce firefight, a U.S. military official told CNN. How many freedom fighters,opps i mean UNFRIENDLIES were killed?
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 3 years 9 weeks ago Web link Michael Dunn
    Isn't politics fun? Of course the media can ignore Paul all they want to. It's their media after all. But there is going to be a cost in doing so. They are sacrificing what little credibility they have left.
  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 3 years 9 weeks ago Page Glen Allport
    Great comment, tzo. "teach the next generations properly from an early age" -- yep, and of course that's why every State insists on running or regulating the education process. But it's not just education; preventing emotional damage begins in the womb (there's a relevant study featured at today's PhysOrg.com about prenatal stress affecting the children of the stressed mothers, in mice for this particular study; url removed in hopes of getting this comment past STR's over-vigilant spam filter), during birth, during infancy and of course throughout childhood. Modern, hi-tech birth practices -- including the now-record number of C-sections being performed (over 25% of all US births) often cause trauma, block or weaken the mother-child bond, and otherwise cause emotional repression of pain that lasts a lifetime -- and which makes people more likely to fall victim to demogogues who promise to provide the things that stand in for what the people didn't get when they were small (love, compassion, etc) and to pin blame for whatever is unpleasant in life on scapegoat groups. The emotional repression and diminished sense of connection also make it much easier for people to support, and even to cheer on and insist upon, repressive, police-state measures (for "security" or other supposed benefits) and assaults on other groups, be they drug users or those with the wrong political views.
  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 3 years 9 weeks ago Page Glen Allport
    Thanks, Suverans2! Good marketing/promotion info.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 3 years 9 weeks ago Web link Michael Dunn
    Because he has no chance whatever perhaps? He's in his late seventies and comes across to most people as a kook whenever he opens his yap. Just sayin'.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 9 weeks ago Web link Michael Dunn
    "We're in the business of kicking candidates out of the race..." That is correct. "Likening media consolidation to that of the banking industry, [Dan] Rather claimed that “roughly 80 percent” of the media is controlled by no more than six, and possibly as few as four, corporations." ~ http://www.corporations.org/media/media-ownership.gif
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 9 weeks ago Page Glen Allport
    The Fear of Loss is More Powerful Than The Hope For Gain!
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 9 weeks ago Web link Michael Dunn
    G'day Samarami, Has anyone you happen to know seen this clip? The first seven, or so, got it right, you are not supposed to even mention your opponent's name, thus making him non-existent, the last talking head from CNN, I believe, was merely an idiot. If all else fails, try . . . Subversion Definition: Preventing your opponent from getting a hearing. Catch-phrase: Head 'em off at the pass. ...Gaining control of the media and pretending your opponent doesn’t exist.... http://creationsafaris.com/images/BM-BD-Subversion.jpg
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 9 weeks ago
    Oroborus
    Web link Michael Dunn
    I've got a fricken' headache after listening to this...but the lyrics are REALLY meaningful. http://www.lyricsmode.com/lyrics/g/gojira/oroborus.html ROFLMAO
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 3 years 9 weeks ago Web link strike
    From the article: 'McKinley describes himself "as a small government, free-market focused owner of a small business," but...' Don't you just love that "but"? It's always there. What he means is that he's for the free market, except when he's not. There are also state programs for the same thing. Wyoming, the most "conservative" state in the nation, arguably, has the same sort of program. It's just a scam, welfare for airport and airline people.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 3 years 9 weeks ago Web link Don Stacy
    "School choice" is just another euphemism for government "education", funded by theft.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 3 years 9 weeks ago Page Glen Allport
    While I am in general agreement with this article, I have some quibbles with it. First, the notion that if we only craft our message properly, more people will sign up. Nock's essay "Isaiah's Job" warns that maybe this is the wrong way of looking at it. But even if you don't break humans down into "Remnant" and "Masses", there are problems. People generally aren't influenced by argumentation, not outside their area of expertise. I don't agree that there are a few thinking people and many who don't; instead my view is that virtually everyone thinks in some area, that I call their "area of expertise", but outside of that they just depend on a worldview to give answers. For example a mechanic may know an amazing amount about how to get power with reliability out of an engine; but he just takes his worldview's default when the subject of war comes up. And arguing against a person's worldview is pretty hopeless. As Dale Carnegie put it, "You can't win an argument". I am pretty doubtful of this notion of "damaged people", although of course in extreme cases that is so. I think people are actually quite resilient. A good thing too, otherwise no one would survive their parents! I think we have a tendency to look at people who don't agree with us and say, looking down our noses, "He must have had a terrible childhood." Or we try to evangelize freedom, just like the leftists used to do back in the seventies - remember that old phrase, "consciousness-raising", as if the people they were targeting for their evangelism were unconscious? That always struck me as a bit presumptuous, yet here we are doing the same thing. I also don't think we have been underemphasizing compassion all that much. It's usually part of the discussion whenever freedom comes up. My view is that people are generally going to stick with their worldviews until some shock breaks them out of it. When the worldview fails them, only then are they going to be open to another paradigm. And that will happen soon. I don't think there is anything irrational about this behavior, because no one has unlimited time in his life; he must default some opinions to what his worldview tells him. I don't think people are stupid, or damaged or anything else of that nature. They are just being people, that's all. That's the sort of beast we are. Anyway if people could be so easily swayed by argument, they'd be swayed back the next time they ran into a statist with a plausible line. The wonder is not that what we have been doing has gotten so little result; but, given how humans work, that it has gotten so much. Let's not be impatient. Many more will come around when the empire crashes.
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 3 years 9 weeks ago Page Glen Allport
    Glen, thank you for writing this piece. It's the perfect complement to your other writings on the need for both the sina qua non of the nonaggression axion/self-ownership concept and the equally valid perception about the value of empathy and love. PS: At the upcoming Libertopia festival in San Diego (http://libertopia.org/), there will be a presentation by the Summum Bonum Learning Center (a learner-driven learning center), which is now being organized around an educational process that recognizes this two-fold need in the education and raising of children. This educational venture will not be launched until September 2013, but those involved in its development are keeping these twin aspects of liberty at the heart of this learner-centered mode of education.
  • tzo's picture
    tzo 3 years 9 weeks ago Page Glen Allport
    I agree very strongly with you that the emotional component is ultimately important, as emotions will overpower logic for deeply-held beliefs. Throwing data at an unwilling freedom-convert results in an emotional wall of defense. Logic will almost NEVER break down that wall. The human part of humans is emotion. If you can connect with the emotions of an unwilling freedom-convert you will have a much better chance of working with him. How to do that? How to convey the data of your argument and at the same time appeal to emotion without triggering the automatic emotional defense? That's the tricky part, and I imagine it's different with every person. That's why it's important that sites like STR are around, pumping out a stream of arguments that come in from every angle, because there is no small set of arguments that will universally make an impression. And this is another great article, Glen, reminding everyone not to forget about the human connection that is necessary to spread the ideas of freedom and compassion. It is all too easy to get angry at people who won't listen, but I am coming to believe that many people can't listen, especially to overly-assertive arguments. Many are so emotionally damaged that demanding logic from them in certain areas of thought is like demanding that a person with a broken leg sprint across a field with you. It just won't work. You have to take the time that is necessary to fix the damage to the point where you stand a chance of moving forward. Nothing else will work. Of course the easiest route is to teach the next generations properly from an early age so they do not sustain such crippling damage, and then after all us old codgers die off they will be in a better position to shift the paradigm.
  • John deLaubenfels's picture
    John deLaubenfels 3 years 9 weeks ago
    Inferno, Part I of II
    Page tzo
    Excellent, right on target. You have an engaging style as well. Hope your work finds an audience beyond the choir!
  • tzo's picture
    tzo 3 years 9 weeks ago
    Inferno, Part I of II
    Page tzo
    I changed the 60-Minutes link to a video link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FbIX1CP9qr4
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 9 weeks ago
    Inferno, Part II of II
    Page tzo
    "Quit the club! Don’t participate! It is your prerogative! Your psyche, your Being, your Self, is at stake. If you believe in the soul, then that too, is on the line." ~ tzo "Wherefore come out from among them, and be ye separate, saith the Lord, and attach not to the morally impure thing; and I will receive you, And will be a Father[1] unto you, and ye shall be my sons and daughters, saith the all ruling controller."[2] __________________________________________________________________________________________ "And I heard another voice from the sky, saying, "Come out of her, my people, that you be not co-participants of her offenses, and that you receive not of her strokes (punishments/calamities)."[3] ___________________________________________________________________________ [1] Father ...(2.) A name applied as a title of respect to a chief, ruler, or elder, etc. ~ Easton's Bible Dictionary [2] Literal translation of 2Corinthians 6:17-18 [3] Literal translation of Revelation 18:4