Recent comments

  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 21 weeks ago Web link Mike Powers
    Half way where?
  • Emmett Harris's picture
    Emmett Harris 3 years 21 weeks ago Web link Mike Powers
    54% of respondents live off the victims of theft, otherwise known as taxpayers.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 21 weeks ago
    Caveat
    Page tzo
    Delete double-post.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 21 weeks ago
    Caveat
    Page tzo
    Thank you, Tony Pivetta.
  • Tony Pivetta's picture
    Tony Pivetta 3 years 21 weeks ago
    Caveat
    Page tzo
    Non-Aggression Principle. I fully embrace the NAP, even if citizenship in the NAP territorial monopoly of non-force eludes me (even as coerced citizenship in the American territorial monopoly of force saddles me yet).
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 21 weeks ago
    Caveat
    Page tzo
    The primary practical objective of the juristic study of natural law is to propose rules or practical principles that, if followed by human beings, are likely to maintain, strengthen and restore respect for the natural order of the human world. They are the principles and rules of justice. ~ Natural Law by Frank van Dun, Ph.D., Dr.Jur. - Senior lecturer Philosophy of Law
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 21 weeks ago
    Caveat
    Page tzo
    Paul, what is NAP? Having been in sales in my former life I am familiar with Dale Carnegie's training, but I can't recall the acronym NAP.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 21 weeks ago Web link Don Stacy
    G'day jd-in-georgia, Some things that some individuals may not know about that verse you quoted. First, according to Noah Webster (c.1828) the etymology of the word "kingdom" is, [king and dom, jurisdiction.] Secondly, the VERY FIRST definition Thayer's Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament gives for the Paleo-Greek word, kosmos, translated "world" in that verse is "1) an apt and harmonious arrangement or constitution, order, government". Thus, Jesus [sic], in my opinion, was telling Pilate, the Roman procurators of Judea, that his authority was not of[1] Pilate's "jurisdiction", in other words, that his authority did not come from the Roman "government". And, for the record, my authority does not come from the United States Government or any of its franchises. __________________________________________________________________________ OF, prep. 1. From or out of; proceeding from, as the cause, source, means, author or agent bestowing ~ Webster's 1828 American Dictionary of the English Language
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 3 years 21 weeks ago
    EMPs
    Web link Michael Dunn
    A bunch of hogwash. The 2011 version of the "missile gap". The ruling class will try anything to get our attention focused on anything but them.
  • rita's picture
    rita 3 years 21 weeks ago
    EMPs
    Web link Michael Dunn
    So say "many Senators, Congressmen and terrorist experts" -- well who wouldn't belive THEM? It's not like they've ever lied to us before, right? Right?
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 3 years 22 weeks ago
    Caveat
    Page tzo
    I know Molyneux has made an attempt to build a proof of natural law, but I am not entirely satisfied with what he has done and his critics are pretty convincing that he's not succeeded. It's well worth the study, but the fact is, the world IS based on "might makes right". Always has been, right back to the dawn of life. We humans (some anyway) would like to get away from that, and it might even happen that some day virtually all will live by something better. But for now and a long time to come, it's merely a theoretical exercise. I don't take it as a given that there "exists a set of objective, ethical rules that can be discovered". I think there might be, and life would be better if there were and if people adhered to them consistently, but I don't think life would end if it were not possible to prove them. Some obvious rules of thumb already exist (NAP, stuff Dale Carnegie has written for getting along with other human beings, etc.) and that may be as good as it gets. And that is pretty good, maybe good enough. Even if there is a proof out there, 99.99% of the human race will never understand it. They can grasp a few rules of thumb though.
  • jd-in-georgia's picture
    jd-in-georgia 3 years 22 weeks ago Web link Don Stacy
    I really got a kick out of the "What would Jesus cut" reference. This alone should send up a red flag for Chistians. After all, Jesus told Pilate, "My kingdom is not of this world." Personally, I do not need government telling me how to show charity. Government charity is earthly charity and is now as it always has been, doomed to fail. Why? Because real charity is freely given and not taken from one to be redistributed to another. (My comments do not necessarily reflect ideas and opinions of STR or the readers of STR, but my last sentence speaks volumes, regardless of one's beliefs.)
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 22 weeks ago Web link Don Stacy
    "One cannot remain an anarchist and take part in...government." ~ Carl Watner "Take part in...government" seems to mean, to Carl, at least, that One can maintain membership in, and be entitled to, the privileges doled out by the government...so long as One "does not vote" or "compete for a position of power". I put forth, that if One hasn't withdrawn from membership in the body politic, then One IS "a player", and IS already in a "position of power", regardless of whether One utilizes that "power" or not, i.e. whether One votes or not. If, however, One's vote does not have the "power" to "alter or abolish" the government, as some here contend, (with which I agree), then One withholding his or her vote is a virtually meaningless act. And, I can only begin to imagine some of the interpretations "...or support the players of the game in any other way" might engender, so I will stay away from that can of worms, for the time being.
  • GregL's picture
    GregL 3 years 22 weeks ago
    The Oslo Attacks
    Web link Westernerd
    Geoffrey, Thanks for your interesting and informative reply. You make several points that I hadn't considered before. - Greg
  • GeoffreyTransom's picture
    GeoffreyTransom 3 years 22 weeks ago
    The 'Muslim Menace'
    Page Jim Davies
    The brutal fact is, unless you're prepared to tie yourself in logical knots, the primary works of all the major religions are palpably hogwash. We are all atheists when it comes to the other guys' gods - which means that the average religious person is only one god away from an actual sensible view of things. By all means, wonder at the beauty of nature: I'm all for that, be it a bunch of mountains or the unmistakeable evidence of intelligence in the eyes of an orang-utan. But if you then want to appropriate the role of sole interlocutor with some putative higher power: fuck you and the ass you rode in on. The other thing I find abhorrent about religious types is that - at root - it is about worship of power. If HWHY didn't have the ability to kick serious ass, nobody would be cutting the end off their cock to appease him. (Srsly - is that even a thing? It's retarded). Douglas Adams may not have coined the term 'the fundamental interconnectedness of everything', but the first time I read that phrase was in a book of his ("Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency") - I am absolutely open to the possibility that we are all wi-fi enabled, but some of us are out of range of the router or have the wrong password.... or that there are multiple routers. What I am NOT open to, is the idea that from the hundreds of quintillions of stars in the tens of billions of galaxies that we are aware of, the 'Creator' chose our ludicrously tiny ball of rock. And I am even LESS open to the idea that he chose an incestuous Mesopotamian goatherd to father the Master Race, in exchange for cock-snippings-in-perpetuity (plus burnt offal, blood sprinkling on the altar, a campaign of genocide... and the sine qua non: mindless obeisance). And given the (sensible) idea that the fruit of a poisoned tree is not to be trusted, anything that derives from that story is ipso facto to be rejected. And if that makes baby Jeebus cry, then no doubt he can call in a predator Drone strike to generate some more blood for his lunatic Dad. One last word on the 'fundamental interconnectedness of everything'... whoever maintains the router for the likes of Blair, Cheney and Sarkozy needs to have their admin password hacked.
  • GeoffreyTransom's picture
    GeoffreyTransom 3 years 22 weeks ago
    The Oslo Attacks
    Web link Westernerd
    Hi Greg, BitCoin and Tor have a HUGE impact on the viability of "Liberty Pools", in the same way that they have helped 'Silk Road' undermine drug prohibition. It's still early days, but it's clear to me that legislation cannot make demand disappear - it can only raise prices and risk premia - and as a result, there will be a proliferation of pseudonymous payment processes as the market develops. They (the pools) existed before BitCoin and TOR, but payment mechanisms were necessarily convoluted, involved multiple middle-men who facilitated transfers, and were prone to fraud and infiltration by 'law' enforcement... but they did function satisfactorily for those who did the appropriate level of due diligence. In fact Jim Bell's original tract - entitled "Assassination Politics" - required (and forecast) the existence of pseudonymous untraceable payment mechanisms. (And people should be aware, pseudonymity and traceability are two VERY different things. Likewise, TOR does a very good job of obfuscating the origin of data - but if the data is unencrypted, exit node sniffing can extract it). In reality, AP/LP is simply a system of private bounty: and I notice today that George Monbiot has backed a pool for the citizens' arrest of Tony Blair: there is $10k ion the kitty, sourced from donations which were optionally-pseudonymous. Although I support the idea of LP/AP, it does require careful handling given the absence of the requirement for an evidentiary basis for establishing pool. (Some pool managers differentiate between OrgA pools - which have evidentiary bases - and OrgB pools, which are simply 'hit' pools and often have only one bettor). The reason I say that caution is required: prices for 'adverse life events' (ALEs) are plummeting. Back in the 1980s, that sort of thing was really costly unless you were inside the 'wrong' social milieu: anything from $15k upwards, and no less than $2k for a severe beating (e.g., broken nose/ribs/knees/hands). These days those costs have fallen by 2/3rds (put simply: there are a lot of violent people out there who enjoy the opportunity to pursue violence as a paid career). As the risk premium embedded in these markets is driven to zero, the price of any ALE will fall to the marginal cost of its provision - which is equal to the amount of cash required to fund travel and so forth, plus a small premium to overcome the perpetrator's squeamishness. That is a VERY low number: the final payment to the actual perp in most non-lethal ALEs is of the order of $300 - and that has been the case for two decades... the rest of the money goes in risk premia and margins to middle-men. To use a different example: I am not one of the Chicken Littles who think that legalisation of drugs will cause an explosion of demand (the demand curve will change, of thatI am certain - but so will the supply curve)... but even if it did, it would be people doing things to themselves. However if there was an explosion in demand for ALEs in response to a fall in the price, the system will be used to enable cheaper AGGRESSIVE violence (as opposed to defensive or retributive violence - both of which I support). That said, the prime user of aggressive violence in our society is the State, and it already has the lowest cost base - it foists the costs on the victims of its violence. Cheers GT
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 3 years 22 weeks ago
    The 'Muslim Menace'
    Page Jim Davies
    All are a menace except for the likes of thee, and me... ...and I'm not so sure we should trust thee. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 3 years 22 weeks ago Web link strike
    Absolutely. Declare sovereignty. Don't be impressed (or intimidated) by phony "big bucks". Sam
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 22 weeks ago Web link Jad Davis
    "Power corrupts and absolute power corrupts absolutely", because power attracts corrupted/corruptible individuals. "I had a step-grandson who used to set fires....played with GI Joes until he was 16...and molested my two natural Grandchildren. He admitted the molestation to the thugs(pigs) and was NOT held accountable...perhaps because his father was a firefighter and part of the thug brotherhood. He is now in his twenties and....drum roll please.....has become a pig...in louisiana, no less!!!! ~ Comment by Beloved Infidel
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 22 weeks ago Web link strike
    "If you live in USA[sic] this is also your personal credit card bill; you are responsible along with everyone else[sic] to pay this back." ~ WTFnoway.com Correction: If you [are a citizen of the] USA this is also your personal credit card bill; you are responsible along with [all the other citizens] to pay this back.
  • Darkcrusade's picture
    Darkcrusade 3 years 22 weeks ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Double post please delete! wt???
  • Darkcrusade's picture
    Darkcrusade 3 years 22 weeks ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    HaHa SHUT IT DOWN! Minnesota Gubbermint was shut down for three weeks and crime went down. no surprise.
  • morristhewise's picture
    morristhewise 3 years 22 weeks ago
    The 'Muslim Menace'
    Page Jim Davies
    The voice of Racism at Oslo was loud and clear. But that voice will be quieted as the killer spends years in his prison cell. The only sound will be the sound of his voice asking the guard to open the gate, so he can spend some time in the prison yard. He would gladly accept Multiculturalism if given a few less years of prison time.
  • GregL's picture
    GregL 3 years 22 weeks ago
    The Oslo Attacks
    Web link Westernerd
    Geoffrey, What I've seen written so far about the Oslo killings mostly suggests that Breivik acted alone, so your conjecture about it being a team effort provides some good food for thought. It will be interesting to see how this story develops. On a different subject: I responded to a post you wrote a few weeks ago about OpEgypt in which you mentioned "Liberty Pools". In case you didn't see my response, I'm curious as to whether you have any opinions about what impact Bitcoin and Tor might have regarding ""Liberty Pools". - Greg
  • GeoffreyTransom's picture
    GeoffreyTransom 3 years 22 weeks ago
    The Oslo Attacks
    Web link Westernerd
    Full court press by "Morris the Wise" on this guy who is the Norwegian Martin Bryant (although Bryant was a bit of a goofball, and there's no evidence of that in Breivik's history). Same thing is happening over at Zerohedge, with recent registrants pouring reams of 'look at the lone nut' material into Oslo-related threads. As I said elsewhere, for a solo shooter to kill 80 people using light infantry weapons is as near to impossible as makes no odds. As the survivor testimony makes clear, people on the island clearly had cellphone signal - they sent messages and Twitter updates... so they are likely to have called police, too. So whoever did all that killing would have know they had a limited time budget. A man who has never killed, becomes a better life-taker than a professional JSOC/SEALTeam6 sociopath? Sorry, no sale. This has the hallmarks of a team effort - to get that kill count you would need five well-trained experienced killers, and twenty minutes or more (people run like fuck when crowds get fired upon, and moving targets are VERY hard to hit with assault weapons - even if it's not your first kill).
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 3 years 22 weeks ago
    Where's My Contract?
    Page Paul Bonneau
    Paul: "As we get older and naturally shed such obligations (<== child rearing, etc), we can afford to become more hard-core about these things. One of the few benefits of getting old is that you don't have to back down. **************************************************** Excellent point, Paul -- and congratulations on a very well-written essay. I can "afford" (I'm 75, grandpa 23 times, great grandpa of 5) to spout off, refuse to get drivers' license, etc.; to "be a sovereign state". I can rant and I can rave against "government" -- but I must maintain empathy and respect for those I love. Thankfully, 3 of my 7 children are homeschoolers, shielding 13 of the 23 (soon to be 24) grandkids from government ("public") school's harm. I can take credit for cheering them on in that pursuit, but it's the kids' "doing". It's important for me to remember that. I'm aware that they still have to interface with state school officials in submitting to testing (all grandkids test far above mean "normal" scores), allowing "inspections", etc. Two of my sons are "at the helm" -- active in Ron Paul's "campaign" -- and I support their efforts (with my mouth shut for the most part). They've both quit haggling me to get involved or "vote" (although they insist a vote in the "Iowa Straw Poll" wouldn't be considered an "act of violence"), and they know I respect Dr Paul and them for supporting him. I'll help with the younger grandchildren during the upcoming straw poll -- and I'll restrain myself from negativity. Sam
  • morristhewise's picture
    morristhewise 3 years 22 weeks ago
    The Oslo Attacks
    Web link Westernerd
    Evidence will show that the Oslo shooter was politically confused. He was suffering from a childhood trauma due to being sexually abused by an elderly housekeeper. His motive for the shooting had nothing to do with politics but only by a desire to become famous.
  • morristhewise's picture
    morristhewise 3 years 22 weeks ago
    The Oslo Attacks
    Web link Westernerd
    Many want fame and fortune but fortune is difficult to come by. The sociopath at Oslo had no other motive except to become famous and he was successful. His political views were strong but his desire to obtain fame was stronger.
  • Paul the cab Driver's picture
    Paul the cab Driver 3 years 22 weeks ago
    All Sail And No Anchor
    Web link Westernerd
    Yup. he was right. The only solution for this horrible choice between the chaos of democracy and the tyranny of despotism is the elimination of coercive government.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 22 weeks ago
    Where's My Contract?
    Page Paul Bonneau
    Thank you for your response.
  • morristhewise's picture
    morristhewise 3 years 22 weeks ago
    The Oslo Attacks
    Web link Westernerd
    The massacre at Oslo has awakened all peace loving people. Never before has society become aware of the triple threat that is challenging its sanity. Mad bombers, mad shooters, and mad rapists have been showing their ugly heads. Unfortunately the police are not mind readers and these sickos cannot be detected and stopped beforehand. But thanks to the long hands of justice this insane trio will be caught and punished.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 3 years 22 weeks ago
    Where's My Contract?
    Page Paul Bonneau
    Suverans, please see tzo's response below, starting with "When coercion is used..." I couldn't have said it better. I don't particularly disagree with your point about fear of loss of material wealth; in fact I have advocated disengaging from government as much as reasonably possible (note the qualification). I don't agree with Molyneux's view that one should not inconvenience oneself at all (thereby justifying any and all compromise with the state). I think Atlas should shrug. On the other hand, there are limits to this stance. For example, if one has a family, one has an obligation to defend it. Checking off a box on a sheet of paper in order to buy a gun is philosophically obnoxious, as is getting a permit to carry. But one is sometimes forced to make unpleasant choices to get one's most important obligations taken care of. The point is, government is nothing but a very powerful criminal gang. We do not compromise ourselves by dealing with that reality and keeping our current priorities straight (obligations of child rearing first for example). We have not proclaimed the criminal gang's legitimacy in doing so. As we get older and naturally shed such obligations, we can afford to become more hard-core about these things. One of the few benefits of getting old is that you don't have to back down.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 22 weeks ago
    Where's My Contract?
    Page Paul Bonneau
    G'day Paul Bonneau, I've not had a gun put to my head, (and I doubt many here have), but I have had a taser put against my chest directly over my heart, by some no-neck thugs disguised as "peace officers", and I still said, "NO!" "If I have to check a little box that means nothing to me or offends me, to be able to engage in some commerce, I will play their game and check it." ~ Paul Bonneau [Emphasis added] This is not intended as a condemnation of you or anyone else, but as I wrote in a previous post, "(...I perceive that greed, i.e. the fear of the loss of material wealth, is greatest coercive force for many, if not most, of us)".
  • jd-in-georgia's picture
    jd-in-georgia 3 years 22 weeks ago
    Optimism
    Web link Michael Kleen
    I liked this one Michael. I could use a little optimism after hearing about Norway. There is a right way and a wrong way to effect change.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 3 years 22 weeks ago
    Where's My Contract?
    Page Paul Bonneau
    My prescription exactly. Add to that the mental preparation to go to war if war is brought to one. Fred Reed wrote an excellent article about disengaging here: http://lewrockwell.com/reed/reed210.html BTW seeds are taking root all over the place, these days.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 3 years 22 weeks ago
    Where's My Contract?
    Page Paul Bonneau
    Thanks John. See my other articles, listed here: http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001979944563#!/note.php?note_id=105937936152694
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 3 years 22 weeks ago
    Where's My Contract?
    Page Paul Bonneau
    Yeah, that's my reading too. And even if it wasn't, Suverans, you ignore the implicit coercion in the question. If I have to check a little box that means nothing to me or offends me, to be able to engage in some commerce, I will play their game and check it. It does not negate the reality, which is that they are illegitimate. They are putting a gun to my head, and contracts where a gun is on the table are not valid. I bet if they pointed a gun at you and asked you if you were a citizen, you'd say "yes" too.
  • rita's picture
    rita 3 years 22 weeks ago Web link Michael Dunn
    Actually, the first person I always called was my dad -- where I was they don't even let you look at a phone book. My point was that speed dial doesn't do you any good in jail; the longer they can hold you without anyone knowing where you are, the more damage they can do. And doing damage is what they do best.
  • rita's picture
    rita 3 years 22 weeks ago Web link Michael Kleen
    Most of the time I spent in court I spent wondering why the judges even botrher to show up. The prosecutors run the courts and the police run the prosecutors. Seriously, is there anything the cops CAN'T do?
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 3 years 22 weeks ago Web link Michael Kleen
    What is amazing is that the cops have no interest at all. Sure they're tight on resources now but still...
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 22 weeks ago
    Caveat
    Page tzo
    "The science of mine and thine --- [the natural law of man] the science of justice --- is the science of all human rights; of all a man's rights of person and property; of all his rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. It is the science which alone can tell any man what he can, and cannot, do; what he can, and cannot, have; what he can, and cannot, say, without infringing the rights of any other person. It is the science of peace; and the only science of peace; since it is the science which alone can tell us on what conditions mankind can live in peace, or ought to live in peace, with each other." ~ Natural Law by Lysander Spooner ________________________________________________________________________________ "Nowadays, the study of natural law virtually has been banned from the training of lawyers. What remains of it in the academic curriculum of most law schools is no more than a little bit of 'intellectual history', which is devoted mainly to the works of a handful of ancient, medieval and early modern writers and philosophers. Often, students get the impression that natural law is something that can be found only in books (in the same way that statutory law, the verdicts of courts and international treaties are mere texts). They are led to believe that the natural law is nothing but a collection of theories of natural law. It is not. Nor, of course, is the physical universe nothing but a collection of theories of physics. The practice of natural law also has been eliminated almost completely by the legal profession. Very often, the study and the practice of natural law are scorned if not ridiculed." ~ Natural Law by Frank van Dun, Ph.D., Dr.Jur. - Senior lecturer Philosophy of Law. [Emphasis added]
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 22 weeks ago Web link Michael Dunn
    Yup, the ones with no video or audio equipment on board.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 3 years 22 weeks ago Web link Michael Dunn
    Of course at the end it sounded as if he got to enjoy a ride in one of those police elevators I became very familiar with before I quit drinking 30+ years ago. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 3 years 22 weeks ago
    Caveat
    Page tzo
    You've pulled out the essence of the lengthy article and used it as an excellent summary. Sam
  • tzo's picture
    tzo 3 years 22 weeks ago
    Caveat
    Page tzo
    The relationship between entities (cause and effect) is determined by the characteristics of the entities involved. This is no less true of human entities than any other. Even a cursory look quickly reveals that imposition upon personal preference by initiation of force and/or coercion produces the effect of resentment and hostility. It logically follows that if peace and harmony is the objective, refraining from initiation of force and coercion is the natural law means to achieve and sustain this end. How can any truth be more visible and irrefutable? ~Delmar England   
  • rita's picture
    rita 3 years 22 weeks ago Web link Michael Dunn
    Thanks.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 22 weeks ago Web link Michael Dunn
    Very good, Sam. Did you hear that agent, "...we are allowed to lie in interviews"? The rule is, if their lips are moving they are lying. So, other than identifying who you are, keep your mouth shut...unless of course you are like the Articulant Motorist.
  • Suverans2's picture
    Suverans2 3 years 22 weeks ago Web link Michael Dunn
    "...memorize your attorney's phone number..." ~ rita Memorize this, rita, "your attorney", whether (s)he is appointed by the court or paid for by you, is, first and foremost, an officer of the court.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 3 years 22 weeks ago Web link Michael Dunn
    And remember this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6wXkI4t7nuc&feature=player_embedded Sam
  • tzo's picture
    tzo 3 years 22 weeks ago
    Caveat
    Page tzo
    You had pointed out this paper a few days back, and I buzzed through it rather quickly. I think there's a lot of good things there, and I agree that it needs some editing, but it will need a more careful reading on my part, which I plan on doing. I think I want to like it. :>