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  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 7 weeks 6 days ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    See below.
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 7 weeks 6 days ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    Hello, Psychoticnut: I'm glad you liked this piece, and I think that your assessment of the Irish King as more of an arbitrator than a dictator is correct. I am not, however, an expert on Irish kingship, although I am aware that Irish society in general was more anarchic then we realize. The situation with the king here reminds me of the Old Testament story regarding the replacement of judges by kings--a big mistake! The reference to that story is in chapter 8 of 1 Samuel (1 Kings, chapter 8 in the Catholic scriptures). I believe that even Stephan Kinsella would agree with this argument as presented by the king as it addresses only the understood use of an object between two people. Usually a request to copy a book took place in an overt manner. In many cases during the Middle Ages, a book was lent out for copying, and in return another book was lent back to the original lender so that they could make a copy as well. Sometimes the copier would also provide the lender with a new copy as well as returning the original. In the case of a particularly rare book, the lender could demand a higher "price" of this type. This was a very reciprocal form of trade. In the case of this tale, St Columba clearly violated the well-understood norm that St. Finnian was insisting upon, and it corresponds to much of what Kinsella wrote. It is important not to confuse this kind of just restriction regarding the use of a physical object with current copyright restrictions that bind parties who have no contract. Kinsella spells this out very well in his papers. I sent a link to him, so he will probably say something on his site. I will mention it when it comes up.
  • PSYCHOTICNUT's picture
    PSYCHOTICNUT 7 weeks 6 days ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    I'm also curious to hear whether you think the Irish king made the correct judgement.
  • PSYCHOTICNUT's picture
    PSYCHOTICNUT 7 weeks 6 days ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    That was an excellent assessment Larry. It does bring to mind another question however. I'm wondering if this story isn't evidence of the failing of private arbitration. It's true that they went to a king (head of a government) to make the determination but they did agree to allow his arbitration. In fact it was Saint Columba, according to this, who chose the arbiter. When his arbiter chose not to side with him, he still resorted to violence. The fact that the king could not thwart Saint Columba's refusal to comply seems to be more evidence, in my opinion, that this government was not a strong controller of the people of such a kind that we perceive of governments today. I'm interested to hear what you make of that.
  • zygodactyl's picture
    zygodactyl 8 weeks 1 day ago Page Paul Hein
    I have no intention of engaging with anyone in the government more than what is absolutely necessary because it is a real waste of time. I did fall into temptation a few years ago when Texas at first passed the anti-groping law. I e-mailed the local Missouri state level Republican representative and requested that our state do the same thing or else I just might move to Texas. I also had noticed the hundreds of bills listed on-line that were being considered, so I also expressed strong disapproval for big government growth at the state level as well as at the federal level despite our bad economic times. He never even bothered to reply back to me, and the pathetic Texas politicians caved to the feds, so I still live here. I think that a more effective way to plant seeds in the minds of some people is by calling your local talk radio morning shows. I live close to a lake that has quite a few resorts, so my closest radio station chats about the local events around the lake, along with some politics with a Republican slant. I don't bother listening to that one, but I do listen to one that is just beyond the reach of my portable radios' antenna via computer entitled The Gary Nolan Show. His show is based in Columbia, Missouri which is very close to the state capital, and is on-air from 9 AM to noon M-F. Gary Nolan , unfortunately, is a minarchist who still believes that most cops are good people, and believes the official version of the 9-11 events. He also ran for Presidency as the Libertarian candidate in 2002. I disagree with him about many things, but his show is far better than Rush Limbaugh's show, and you can actually call into the show and talk to him. The two times that I have called in so far were when Jim Babka, President of Downsize DC dot org sat in for Gary. I'm sure that many heads within the listening area were exploding when I said that Constitition should be disposed of properly, that the founders illegally replaced the Articles of Federation with the Constitution, that the first three Presidents violated the Constitution without being punished, and a few other things. I ended by saying that I believe in genuine self-government as opposed to the pseudo self government that we now have. Surprisingly, Jim said that my dream was beautiful and he invited me to visit his Zero Aggression Project website.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 8 weeks 1 day ago Page Paul Hein
    That's OK, I suppose, if you've got nothing better to do with your time. I made some similar suggestions here: http://ncc-1776.org/tle2013/tle745-20131117-04.html However I question being motivated by the minions' annoyance. They are usually pleased if you engage them, because engagement itself confers legitimacy. Maybe better to ignore them. That's bureaucrats, by the way. As to politicians, I see little profit in wasting time with them.
  • Log from Blammo's picture
    Log from Blammo 8 weeks 1 day ago Page Paul Hein
    While the phrase is essentially mock Latin to begin with, I believe it is usually "illegitimi non carborundum." Corundum, as emery, is a useful abrasive in its own right, but as ruby and sapphire is considered a precious stone. Carborundum, otherwise known as silicon carbide, has been grinding things down for 120 years as a synthetic mineral, and is only known to jewelers as moissanite. It still works either way. But the reason why it works for them is that nickel-and-diming the human livestock is how they earn their livelihoods. They can spend six hours a day chipping away at us and still goldbrick among themselves for another two, while the people like you and me are still trying to do something useful at our day jobs. Pestering the government happens on our own time and on our own dime, and competes with hours that could be used on something else. And it is about as rewarding as fishing for muskellunge in an inflatable kiddie pool, or painting a wall just to watch it dry. That is how we can be ground down by a gang with far fewer numbers. They simply have more man-hours in the day to wear away at our resolve, not having any more useful occupation that could otherwise turn their labor into wealth. Having rejected the proposition that we might take the necessities of life without offering back anything in return, we give to the economy, that we might get something back. That is why I do not endorse fighting fire with fire, in a war of attrition. They have so much time to waste, they must have load of extremly ironic meetings about how to waste less time. If we make an overt attempt to waste their time, they might simply opt to hire another person away from the productive economy just to dream up more bureaucratic snipe hunts. That is why it is best to use the state's propensity for wasting time against itself. Bureaucrats are *experts* at wasting time. How about we play let's you and him fight? Turn some of those government guns back toward the government, and they are no longer pointed at us.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 8 weeks 2 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    eugenedw: "...Iraq, and places like Somalia, illustrate what happens when government disappears, but not people's desire for or belief in it..." And that, my friend, underscores the tipping point for all history. And it is the entrée, or liberty to enter, for anarchy (<== pdf). I don't know how many readers place credence in a Book called the Hebrew Bible. And that's really not important. It remains the world's best-seller, which makes It unwise to dismiss out-of-hand. Many see It as writings of old, long dead but superstitious men. To an extent they may be correct. Others base their entire life's philosophy upon It (or what they think they know and believe about It -- which is a unique topic in itself). So they, too, must be heard, since they represent the greatest percentage of religious folks in this part of the world -- and a large segment of the world's total religious. I submit The Book is a treatise on anarchy -- anarchy is its center core and theme. And the fulcrum, or code, of the entire Book rests on this short passage. In my humble opinion (which ain't so humble, so I'm told). For a discourse on the endless conflict you mention from the beginning of recorded history, please spend some time with this (it's not a real easy read, because he chops most professing anarchists off at the knees). It's by the late Delmar England, who at first appears to be an atheist -- but I believe he was more anti-religion than he was atheist. That, also, is a topic for discussion. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 8 weeks 2 days ago
    Untitled
    Page Joseph S. Bommarito
    War is the Health of the State. Please, please -- do not "...thank me for serving..." I served nobody. I did disservice to everybody. And I regret that it took me the better part of 70 years to come to this understanding -- and another almost 10 years to forgive myself. Sally, you can be thankful for Joe's memory. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 8 weeks 2 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Opening paragraph: "May 23, 2014 (Tony Cartalucci - ATN) - Life goes on as normal in Thailand's capital of Bangkok the day after the Royal Thai Army declared it was taking power from the diminished, ineffectual "caretaker government" Thursday. Businesses and offices were open as usual on Friday with no discernible difference for Thais. TV programming is expected to be returned to normal today as well." Think about this: let's say the same "royal army" (or its equivalent) thoroughly defeated and "took over" the District of Collectivism and its "Pentagon" and all it's gargantuan appurtenances (probably no such luck, but let's play house anyhow). Would "...life go on as normal.."??? Yes, it would. Citizenship is a directed mirage. There is no jurisdiction except at the muzzle of a firearm. Sam
  • eugenedw's picture
    eugenedw 8 weeks 2 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Steve: Yes, in a case like this, it seems to me the best anarchist opinion is neutrality. The Thai people have gone from the frying pan into the fire, and so it will endlessly continue until they realize they need neither a democratically elected government, nor a military dictatorship.
  • eugenedw's picture
    eugenedw 8 weeks 2 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Iraq, and places like Somalia, illustrate what happens when government disappears, but not people's desire for or belief in it. Then everyone and his dog wants to be president, leading to endless conflict.
  • Steve's picture
    Steve 8 weeks 2 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    This article suggests that the US killed 1M Iraqis in the 2003 Iraq war, which is simply false. The total number was far lower, and the violence was mostly between Sunnis and Shiites, though the US certainly shares responsibility for having removed Iraq's previous flawed government, with a very flawed transition plan. Such hyperbole discredits an argument that is otherwise worth attention. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casualties_of_the_Iraq_War
  • Steve's picture
    Steve 8 weeks 2 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Thaksin "is unelected and therefore a dictator"? Say what? "The coup has so far been peaceful and well-organized." Peaceful coup--now there is a new oxymoron for the collection. Apparently the king has blessed it, so that makes it even more legitimate.  I never thought to see an article at STR, even an external one, celebrating a military coup. Yeah, Thailand is a mess. Neither the red nor the yellows have the moral high ground.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 8 weeks 3 days ago
    The Compromise
    Page Paul Bonneau
    "...But I save my curses for the good people who, through their misguided efforts, keep the whole ugly mess going. The simple, basically decent, weak-willed and indoctrinated people who take the easy way without considering the bill that will have to be paid some sad future day..." About all we can do for now is to urge our family, neighbors and friends (and them "good" folks out thar in radio land) to abstain from beans. If 80% or 90% of them would observe that little recommendation much of the "battle" (pun intended) would be won. They won't. And, of course, you need to continue to publish hard-hitting essays such as this one. Don't ever sell yourself short in your understanding of the positive influence you have on me and many, many others -- including, I'm sure, members of your own family. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 8 weeks 3 days ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    Paul: "It's not that people don't care; it's that they understand reality" I believe you've hit the nail on the head, Paul. Daily Bell describes it this way. More and more there appears to be no shortage of folks on the web who see the dilemma and are willing to outline the plight of those who suffer from tyranny. The daily entrées here at STR are filled with those examples; although I believe the attempt to rectify that was made here with the STR "blog" (I'll admit that I have perused it but not used it). Mencken may have died with his hit song still in his heart. I made a comment on another forum a few minutes ago -- let's see if I can reproduce it here: Holiday of the Hoi Polloi Inbox 12:34 PM (4 minutes ago) to Bobbers, Splinter Passing this on for what it's worth. I personally am more inclined to treat all the white man's public holidays with the indifference they deserve. But friends and neighbors will all be in a "celebration mode" -- few with any inkling of the bizarre nature of such "holidays" (why they exist, who is behind their promotion, etc etc). All I can really do effectively is to urge you to abstain from beans. That's the place to start. I could also encourage you to cease making "voluntary" confessions to the white man, and to refrain from what the late Delmar England called the "...language of slavery..." (referring to thievery as "tax", confessions as "returns", submitting to the coercion with what is supposed to sound like a legal term: "filing", etc etc). My friend -- our friend -- Irwin Schiff tried that, and see where it got him. But that would be going beyond the pale. For now I'll merely let you read Jeff's take on his public holiday: http://dollarvigilante.com/blog/2014/5/24/in-memory-of-those-killed-by-t... Sam
  • Sharon Secor's picture
    Sharon Secor 8 weeks 3 days ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    Exactly. 
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 8 weeks 5 days ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    It's not that people don't care; it's that they understand reality: "People do not expect to find chastity in a whorehouse. Why, then, do they expect to find honesty and humanity in government, a congeries of institutions whose modus operandi consists of lying, cheating, stealing, and if need be, murdering those who resist?" -- H.L. Mencken
  • eugenedw's picture
    eugenedw 8 weeks 5 days ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    Yet another WTF moment, brought to you courtesy of your friendly local government office.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 8 weeks 6 days ago
    The Compromise
    Page Paul Bonneau
    An excellent, concise one, Paul.  Needs to be shared far and wide.
  • Log from Blammo's picture
    Log from Blammo 8 weeks 6 days ago Web link Westernerd
    The problem is that being a cop is one of the better jobs that a poorly educated person can get, especially if they have self-control issues. Compared to the alternatives for that specific demographic, the pay is good, the physical demands are low, and you have a lot of daily autonomy. It is no surprise that cops will be eager to please their bosses, to the detriment of their "customers". By their reasoning, it is far better to oppress the poor and be absolved of responsibility than to join them. The Milgram Obedience and Stanford Prison Experiments practically provide a blueprint for how to make your employees switch off their own ethics while on the job.
  • Log from Blammo's picture
    Log from Blammo 8 weeks 6 days ago Web link Westernerd
    I'm wondering why Reason felt the need to needlessly interject "already underpaid and underappreciated" into their narrative about police. That is emphatically an editorial opinion, and it conflicts with the narrative that police are routinely killing family pets without provocation, remorse, or consequence in multiple cities of the U.S. And police are hardly homogenous across the whole country. Andy Griffiths--if they even still exist anywhere--may be underrated, but I imagine that some residents of Albuquerque would opine that their cops are murderous swine, and overappreciated, while California residents may wonder why ex-cops, retired at the ripe old age of 55, are drawing 6-figure pensions. Hitting that phrase was like stepping into a deceptively deep pothole in a wintry parking lot.
  • Log from Blammo's picture
    Log from Blammo 9 weeks 18 hours ago Web link A. Magnus
    The pig/chimp hybrid hypothesis actually made me laugh out loud. It suggests that a "geneticist" is unfamiliar with how species work. The essence of humanity is not the sum of its DNA. I, for one, would not mind tinkering with my own genes. For instance, if I were to assemble a retrovirus that targets the phi-GULO pseudogene and repairs it, using a gene copied from practically any other mammal, my liver would begin producing vitamin C and peroxide. Is that "corruption"? It seems to me that the corruption was losing that capability in the first place, and having insufficient interbreeding humans to repair it from within our own gene pool. This particular djinn is already out of the jar. If you need to be alarmist, bang the gongs against misfolded protein prions arising from newer sciences such as preoteomics. It takes significant computing resources to calculate how a given gene sequence translates to a particular protein, and even more to design a protein and calculate backwards to a gene that creates it. This is coming within our grasp. If you are afraid of animal DNA corrupting the genome, cower in horror at the prospect that we can now design entirely novel genes. Why, imagine what could be done! You could design a venomous baby! Make a virus that kills only the Miller family! Cure a profitable cancer! There's really no more to fear here than any other potentially useful technology. You will likely not even notice it, unless your child chooses to become a bioengineer.
  • eugenedw's picture
    eugenedw 9 weeks 20 hours ago Web link A. Magnus
    Mostly alarmist nonsense. As for Dr. Eugene McCarthy, I have to wonder whether he even exists, and if so, when last he has taken his medication. :-)
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 9 weeks 1 day ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    If you send your kids into the belly of the beast for "education", you can't complain over this sort of thing. Homeschool. Sam
  • Sharon Secor's picture
    Sharon Secor 9 weeks 1 day ago Web link Sharon Secor
    You're right, the illegal zip-lock bags was humorous, all things considered. However, I should say, since it seems you're writing from South Africa, that I'm pretty sure the law doesn't apply to standard use sizes, like sandwich-sized, quart and gallon. I'm betting that what is illegal in that state are what you have to ask for using the term jewelry bag in most other places, the tiny ziplock bags that people sell small amounts of pot and other substances in. But, who knows, I don't ive in that state and there's no telling what drug war zealots have made illegal there. They very well may have legislated against all ziplocks -- you know, think of the children and all.
  • eugenedw's picture
    eugenedw 9 weeks 2 days ago Web link Sharon Secor
    Cops abusing their power to enrich themselves is pretty much standard practice in Third World states all over the planet, including here in South Africa. We have lots of street vendors here, and for the most part, their businesses are technically illegal, though often tolerated. But now and then, out of the blue, the cops raid them, kick over their stalls, and blatantly steal their merchandise. I have to say though that what I found the most astonishing about the article was that it is illegal in Pennsylvania to sell zip-lock bags! Well, that one made me laugh - it sounds quite literally like something out of a Monty Python sketch.
  • wkmac's picture
    wkmac 9 weeks 4 days ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    You might also want to add this lady to the list. http://www.macon.com/2014/05/14/3097249/former-nw-georgia-judge-indicted...
  • eugenedw's picture
    eugenedw 9 weeks 5 days ago Page John deLaubenfels
    The thing is, in the modern world it has become so difficult to enforce copyright that the law has in any event become somewhat irrelevant, whether we like it or not. Then there is this bit: "Yes, J.K. Rowling would probably have made enough from writing Harry Potter books to justify her efforts, but struggling writers would be pushed from barely eking out an existence into giving up writing, if theft were legalized." ---I doubt this very much, because who would bother to copy the work of a failed writer? It's the successful books and movies and music that get copied. "Failed writers in the past are not seen today, and so it is easy to pretend that they never existed, provided one has sufficient motivation to do so." ---But did they fail because they had no copyright protection, or did they fail because they were just not very good at writing things that people actually wanted to read? One must in any event take a look at the history of copyright law: it was never intended as a way to reward writers. Right from the start, it was a tool for the state with which to exercise control. Then there is one last point: to enforce copyright law costs money, which the state gets from me. But personally, I have no use whatever for copyright law. So why the heck should I pay to have it enforced? If you don't want your stuff to be copied, don't publish it. It's that simple.
  • eugenedw's picture
    eugenedw 9 weeks 5 days ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    This is it! I am patenting oxygen! ("A new method for using oxidation in the generation of biochemical energy.") You want to breathe, you'd better pay me first...
  • eugenedw's picture
    eugenedw 9 weeks 5 days ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    I notice that he heads an organization called Stop Common Core Nevada. Now, if he spends all the time and energy that he lavishes on that organization on educating his own kids instead, he wouldn't have so many problems...
  • eugenedw's picture
    eugenedw 9 weeks 5 days ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    There is one thing that should perhaps be brought up here. I wonder how many of the victims described in the article, if you had interviewed them just an hour before they became victims, would have approved of the idea of a powerful government. How many of them are anarchists? How many became anarchists or libertarians after they fell victim to the system? Should we necessarily have much sympathy with statists when they become the victims of the very thing they so fervently approve of? Either way, it may be useful to start a sort of contact organization, that makes a point of contacting victims such as the ones mentioned in the article, and then attempt to convert them to anarchism. They might make easy converts. :-)
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 10 weeks 7 hours ago Page Lawrence Samuels
    We've all heard that truth is the first casualty of war. Once conflicts begin to arise people in their own hearts begin to rewrite history. I think the reason we tend to do that sort of thing is because often we're not happy with what we said or what happened or what we did. So we'll lie awake in bed at night rewriting the script of what happened the preceding day. We'll spend that hour or two or maybe three hours before we wind up getting to sleep at night rehashing the scene, justifying what we said -- explaining to ourselves why we did certain things. And in the process of it we'll come to believe something entirely different about what happened from what really happened. Most of us also agree that war is the health of the state. German National Socialism (NAZIS) and Italian Fascism are about war. Almost all of what we know of as "world history" defaults back to war. Because war is what grand wizards of states do. And virtually all of history is flawed -- self justification. Even sincere writers like yourself have to try to decipher the machinations of questionable sources. And you can rest assured Wikipedia is not overseen by tame, truth-seeking volunteers. Here is a classic example. Dr. Andrew Wakefield has been exonerated by many substantive studies, but Wiki will not take down their falsehood. Lots of recent articles regarding the manipulation of web content and search results by Google and the majors. I don't envy your attempt to seek valid information concerning a conflict that has been raked over by multiple millions of "authors". WWII "buffs" proliferate even 75 years hence. The late Harry Browne had this to say about the divide-and-conquer left ("liberal") vs right ("conservative") phenomenon: Conservatives vs Liberals Conservatives say government cannot end poverty by force, but they believe government can use force and threats of violence to make people moral. Liberals say government cannot make people moral, but they believe government can use force and threats of violence to end poverty (redistribute wealth). Neither group attempts to explain why government is so clumsy and destructive in one area but a paragon of efficiency and benevolence in the other. ~Harry Browne Liberty A-Z p 35 Sam .
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 10 weeks 9 hours ago Page Paul Hein
    "Apparently, the fact that they have written down their wishes justifies their belief that I must obey them. Why?" It's a religious thing. We need to find out what the rulers want, and do the opposite, as much as we can. It's for our mental health.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 10 weeks 10 hours ago Page Lawrence Samuels
    It's funny leftists don't want to own up to this, but they undoubtedly have to account for Lenin and Stalin, so not all is lost. I suspect they are recasting Mussolini and Hitler as rightists to have enemy icons that everybody can hate. Easier than making Locke or Jefferson into an enemy! But the left-right notion is not very useful after all. Leftists often sound like rightists and vice-versa, so that over the long run there seems little difference. Its utility seems to boil down to a "divide and conquer" tactic by the ruling class, and little else. Those folks in Wikipedia ought to be a bit more careful. Having a bias is not good for the reputation of encyclopedists (or whatever they are called). Next time they hit me up for a donation I will have to refer them to your article.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 10 weeks 10 hours ago Page Paul Hein
    From the essay: "Freedom is impossible when assorted strangers claim the power to dominate you--and you accede to their demands." The key phrase here is "...and you accede to their demands..." I'm an advocate of what's called the "Serenity Prayer" -- where a Power greater than I is asked to help give rise to... "...the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, The courage to change the things I can, And wisdom to know the difference. I'm an over-the-road trucker. You mentioned Jefferson City, indicating you're Missourian. I stopped at a restaurant down in Kennet, MO, one day last fall. As I was sitting there I sensed there was something different about the place. Then it dawned on me: there were ash trays on the table with butts still in them. Then I looked around and realized several of the customers were smoking. I felt like standing up and cheering! Kennet is located far down in the "boot-heel" of MO (almost in Arkansas on two sides, and within 20 miles of TN to the east). I figured the owners must have decided to ignore the state "law" against smoking, calculating the psychopaths probably wouldn't venture that far into the remote outreaches of MO to "enforce-the-law". Like you, I'm not a smoker. In a free society I would be one to choose a "non smoking" cafe -- or one with ventilated zones for smokers. Smoking is an act that takes into consideration nobody but the smoker. The owner of the establishment, however, is the only individual who can legitimately allow or ban smoking, based upon his or her ability to satisfactorily accommodate both types of customers. Your property is not our property. Anybody who says otherwise should be ignored when practicable. Sam
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 10 weeks 10 hours ago Web link A. Magnus
    You can turn an old computer into a router that is not so compromised, by loading it with pfsense. See pfsense.org.
  • eugenedw's picture
    eugenedw 10 weeks 1 day ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    Glock: When I was a kid, I knew old folks who harvested some rain water from their roof in an open tank. Soon after the rain, sediments would settle in the bottom and the water was crystal clear. Certainly good enough for washing, and if you boil it, you could surely drink it too. Even from a smallish roof and in a fairly dry climate, you can harvest thousands of liters of water from your roof every year. If, that is to say, you don't get arrested for doing so.
  • eugenedw's picture
    eugenedw 10 weeks 1 day ago
    The National Non-Debt
    Page Paul Hein
    Around here (South Africa) there are lots of jewelry stores that sell necklaces made of 9 carat gold. These are fairly cheap, and the chains are rather simple in design and machine-made, so I would guess that most of the value resides in the gold itself rather than the value added by turning it into chains. It seems to me that these may be an affordable way for people who live on a very low budget (like me!) to invest in gold, and should there be an economic collapse, bits of such chains can easily be snipped off and used as medium of exchange. But I don't really know - would be interested to hear further comments on this.
  • Thunderbolt's picture
    Thunderbolt 10 weeks 1 day ago Page Paul Hein
    Dr. Hein: This is really striking at the root of the entire game! Glock is correct here also. Who gave them the authority to take your money? Jim Davies has created a list of various government employee types, to whom one can send an explanation about how their employment is immoral. It is to be found on his Anarchist Alternative site.
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 10 weeks 1 day ago Page Paul Hein
    What about all those IRS agents who received healthy bonuses and don't pay taxes. How do they do that? I don't want to pay taxes, but they will be after me if I don't and then take double or tripple that in fines, fees, and other hidden costs.
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 10 weeks 1 day ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    I like that Sam. Seven to eight cars ahead. I would venture two to three cars behind is that is managable, the of course there are those side roads, but your eyes should have noted them a long way back. I do hope your eyes and ears are far better than Mine, I am one of those who needs seat belts and a knife to cut the belt to get out.
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 10 weeks 1 day ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    I like that Sam. Seven to eight cars ahead. I would venture two to three cars behind is that is managable, the of course there are those side roads, but your eyes should have noted them a long way back. I do hope your eyes and ears are far better than Mine, I am one of those who needs seat belts and a knife to cut the belt to get out.
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 10 weeks 1 day ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    Why not start your own garden using heirloom seeds and saving those seeds, Next year another species and so on till you have your seeds. I do it every year and never spend a cent of packaged seeds. Have you seen the price they are asking for just ten itty bitty seeds?
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 10 weeks 1 day ago
    Never Say Die
    Web link Bradley Keyes
    I thought that waas a science fiction piece, B grade movie. You are always in my thoughts Sam.
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 10 weeks 1 day ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    Ha! That s--t has already started in Michigan. The Michigan Agricultural Commission has now extended to local authorities to criminalize gardens, small animals as chickens, rabbits and goats. You have to be, currently, 250 feet away from your nearest neighbor. If you are a suburbanit and raised a garden your days are numbered here in Michigan. Not much different than Colorado criminalizing catching rain water in buckets or barrels. (P.S. If you catch rain water from your roof, please don't use it. Birds and squirrels and other critters poop on your roof and it all comes down into your barrel)
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 10 weeks 1 day ago
    The National Non-Debt
    Page Paul Hein
    If you do not mind Paul. Would you share with us what form of monetary exchange you are using. Some say I am stupid, but I am collecting bottels and bottle's of liquor as my medium of exchange for what I need. I just picked up a bottle of 12 year old scotch for half the price listed. In times to come I am guesstimating it will be worth three times the face value. Of course if you don't drink I could be poop out of luck. I would go tobacco, but that goes bad in a short period of time unless you can freeze it. Toilet paper is a good one also, but for now I an standing over the edge of the cliff with an alternative under me.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 10 weeks 2 days ago
    The National Non-Debt
    Page Paul Hein
    "What passes for money today is not mined, or extracted from the earth. It is created by the banks with a few keystrokes." What is amazing to me is how long this farce continues. Print up some paper notes with dead presidents on them, and people continue to take them indefinitely - because others continue to take them as well, and because they can "always" be traded for things of actual value. Until they can't. And even those who understand the farce won't last forever, continue to use them. We are like those cartoons of Wile E Coyote, who has just run off the cliff in pursuit of that annoying bird, standing in mid-air with nothing beneath us.
  • eugenedw's picture
    eugenedw 10 weeks 5 days ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    One can only hope that enthusiasts of heirloom varieties will create an underground network in which seeds are exchanged for other seeds, or freely given away. Of course, that will also be illegal, but far more difficult to control than commercial operations.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 10 weeks 5 days ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    Just now I posted a rant at another site over Yahoo's attempts at "big brotherism" (and my distaste for that entire collectivist robotic phenomenon) -- overriding my links with "drops" that have been programed with their recent formatting: "we-know-what-you're-trying-to-say-better-than-you-know-what-you're-trying-to-say". My kids accuse me of just being old, senile, and resistant to change. I accuse them of robotic collectivism. Somehow I think we're both (all -- I've got 7 kids) correct. Collectivists (particularly state costumed and dangerously armed DOT and Highway Patrol types) incessantly chant slogans: "Seatbelts-Save-Lives!" etc. Their mission is to pull truckers over (most of whom know more about highway safety than any or all of them individually or collectively will ever know) for, of all stupid things, "safety checks". Of course parasites are not the least concerned they're taking up an hour or more of your precious drive time -- their hourly pay from the monopoly upon violence that employs them is quite arresting (pun intended). "Police Presence" is their byline ("we're watching you!"). It is important to them that their flashing lights present a warning to all onlookers -- along with their swagger. They didn't teach the swagger when I went through State Patrol Academy in Virginia in the 50's (as a condition of receiving an early discharge from the military). As far as "seatbelts-save-lives" goes, the only way by which a seat belt can save your life is if you're slamming into something or somebody. If you plan on that, I recommend them. What is going to save your life is knowing what's going on 6 or 8 car lengths ahead and avoiding the accidents unfolding out front of you. But, like in the article, one might retort: "...b...but what about the guy who plows into you?"; to which I respond: "if you're not professional enough to have seen that coming, you're one who should definitely wear a seat belt!" Sam