Recent comments

  • mjackso6's picture
    mjackso6 24 weeks 4 days ago Web link KenK
    "We are trying to pass legislation that would require cities and townships to comply with the law" WTF?! So we're working on passing a law to make other lawmakers obey the law?! The sad thing there is that I doubt that the average Joe even sees anything wrong with that bass-ackwards oxymoron of a sentence, much less breaks out snickering when they read it (my immediate reaction). Sometimes I swear that I know exactly how Nero felt when Rome burned... Guess I need to learn how to play a fiddle while I still can...!
  • mjackso6's picture
    mjackso6 24 weeks 4 days ago Web link KenK
    "We are trying to pass legislation that would require cities and townships to comply with the law" WTF?! So we're working on passing a law to make other lawmakers obey the law?! The sad thing there is that I doubt that the average Joe even sees anything wrong with that bass-ackwards oxymoron of a sentence, much less breaks out snickering when they read it (my immediate reaction). Sometimes I swear that I know exactly how Nero felt when Rome burned... Guess I need to learn how to play a fiddle while I still can...!
  • mjackso6's picture
    mjackso6 24 weeks 4 days ago Web link KenK
    "We are trying to pass legislation that would require cities and townships to comply with the law" WTF?! So we're working on passing a law to make other lawmakers obey the law?! The sad thing there is that I doubt that the average Joe even sees anything wrong with that bass-ackwards oxymoron of a sentence, much less breaks out snickering when they read it (my immediate reaction). Sometimes I swear that I know exactly how Nero felt when Rome burned... Guess I need to learn how to play a fiddle while I still can...!
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 24 weeks 6 days ago Web link Westernerd
    Sounds like a must-see movie to me!
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 24 weeks 6 days ago Web link Westernerd
    "Here to stay"... sounds like those guys predicting in 1988 that the Soviet Union would last forever.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 24 weeks 6 days ago
    Weltschmerz, Anyone?
    Page Paul Hein
    "difference between the way things are, and the way they should be." There is no "should be". There is only the way we (individually, and differently) prefer them to be. If "they" outlaw cash, who cares? Just get around it or ignore it. It's probably going to flop shortly just like everything else they try. Remember when FDR confiscated gold? How many actually turned it in? Don't we now have gold, if we want it? "Our rulers seem totally oblivious to the destruction they are wreaking..." I don't think "oblivious" is quite the right word. They simply don't care. BTW Sam, I use the word "ruler" as a synonym for "parasite". "Even worse, if that’s possible, is the acceptance by so many Americans of this homicidal behavior." Why be surprised? The indoctrination apparatus is gigantic and entrenched. Anyway I think you mistake resignation for acceptance. Most people think we should get out of Afghanistan, etc. Most individuals understand their opinion on the matter affects nothing. As to people getting creative with gender issues, why is that anyone else's business? Yes, public figures always will generate comment, no problem there, but for the rest of them? I look at that and I see liberty, even if I might question the aesthetics or taste.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 24 weeks 6 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    I don't think of America as an experiment, much less as an experiment that failed (anyway experiments do not fail in the usual sense, but simply by failing to convey accurate information, in which case they are simply called "inconclusive"). I am in the process of reading this book: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0300152280?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_... In it, the author makes the case that states were difficult to set up in SE Asia since they depend on concentrations of exploitable humans in compact areas - in that case, where rice cultivation predominated. Well, what was America? In effect, one gigantic rice paddy. The population shot up like a rocket, production became enormous, and vast amounts of cash started flowing toward the governments. Is it any wonder we ended up as we did? How could it have gone otherwise? There is no failure here (other than the fantasies of constitution, "rights" and all the rest). There is just the normal progression of human societies. There *are* some differences, that I have written about here: http://strike-the-root.com/how-americans-are-exceptional And there are no doubt other differences. Are they enough to steer us into new territory, something different than the normal human progression? I believe so, but at my age, I won't be around to see. Oh well...
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 24 weeks 6 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    "I feel kinda bad for the teacher..." Ha ha. :-)
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 24 weeks 6 days ago
    A Paradise Lost
    Page Anarchoblake
    In my drives through Oregon, I once ended up here: https://www.google.com/maps/@42.77176,-120.3734781,2632m/data=!3m1!1e3 I got out of the car. There was no wind, no con trails in the sky, no birds, nothing. Just blessed quiet. I felt like the last man on earth. The only sign of human presence was a little-traveled gravel road. I just stood there for a while, basking in the nothingness. It's strange that such a nowhere place remains in my memory. I can definitely agree that a person needs solitude now and then.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 24 weeks 6 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    As Thoreau nicely put it, "Trade and commerce, if they were not made of India rubber, would never manage to bounce over the obstacles which legislators are continually putting in their way; and, if one were to judge these men wholly by the effects of their actions, and not partly by their intentions, they would deserve to be classed and punished with those mischievous persons who put obstructions on the railroads." It's hard to imagine the human race without markets. I suppose it is in our genes...
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 24 weeks 6 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Why all the pessimism? I see all sorts of changes in the direction of liberty. Hang out in any forum for a number of years and you can detect it. Yes, there is a lot of doom and gloom out there, and yes the state is using every means possible to cement its position, but that is natural in "end of empire" times. It's all a house of cards. "The vast majority of the population have never even considered our ideas." As a distinct, complete program, you are right. But that is almost never (in my opinion) how ordinary people learn. They accumulate bits and pieces of the truth over time, without even realizing what is going on. I think you are way too pessimistic. But even a pessimist can follow Sam's prescription.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 24 weeks 6 days ago Web link TheMPP
    Google It For Your Self how a book code works if you want to know more.
  • Kevin Van Horn's picture
    Kevin Van Horn 25 weeks 8 hours ago Web link A. Magnus
    I think that the "catastrophic" and "anthropogenic" parts of "catastrophic anthropogenic global warming" are probably being exaggerated, especially the former, but I also think the comment accompanying the article gives a bogus argument. There is both considerable year-to-year variation and considerable geographic variation in temperatures. You can't conclude much about long-term global temperature trends from one data point like this.
  • Brian Mast's picture
    zygodactyl 25 weeks 21 hours ago Web link TheMPP
    Please expand what you mean by GIFYS because I can't find any meaningful search engine results that explain what that acronym means in terms of communicating with other individuals privately. Written books are usually intended to be read by many people and therefore your mentioning them has no obvious relevance to my comment. It seems to me that only a Statist busybody snoop would question my "want or need" for anonymity at an Anarchist website.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 25 weeks 23 hours ago Web link TheMPP
    A simple "book code" (GIFYS) is way easier to use than all this stuff if you really want or need that level of privacy.
  • Brian Mast's picture
    zygodactyl 25 weeks 1 day ago Web link TheMPP
    I have learned how to use GNUPGP on TOR by reading the instructions. There, I have e-mailed a couple of people successfully. I would like to practice using it more on the clear web, but the problem I run into is finding other people to communicate to that also know how to use it, or are interested in learning.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 25 weeks 4 days ago Web link KenK
    It's been some 50 years since I've owned television. And almost that long since I've accepted a "duty" to accompany students or kids to any kinds of events at stadiums or coliseums. Long before I began getting my feet wet in libertarian and later anarchist thinking I began to feel uncomfortable -- intellectually violated would be an appropriate term -- at subjection to spectator sports. It just felt wrong. The star-spangled malarkey to open the event, the incessant half-time or 7th inning subtle statism, the unrelenting fireworks (with accompanying state themes in the form of "the red, the white and the blue") to send the unwashed masses home with a healthy appreciation for state wars and explosions and murder and slaughter -- all gave me queasy feelings that I couldn't identify at the time. This started long prior to any exposure I had to the web, STR, Lew Rockwell, et al. So this "Senate oversight report" is no surprise. Whoredom is indeed accurate. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 26 weeks 1 day ago Web link TheMPP
    The "comments" section is the scary part. If that is indeed a cross-section we've certainly got our job cut out for us. Sam
  • Anarchoblake's picture
    Anarchoblake 26 weeks 1 day ago Web link TheMPP
    This is one of the most comical, ridiculous examples of indoctrination I've read in a while. The idea that people can be so ingrained with illogical thoughts is astounding. When an armed man stops you on the road and confiscates your weapon for your "own" safety, and retains his own weapon while you expect him to rob you, and he has a change of heart when he realizes you have he same boss, it is not some act of kindness. It is a ridiculous atrocity that is committed time and time again. An armed thug choosing not to rob you, instead robbing the next victim is by no means any less a thug.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 26 weeks 4 days ago
    Weltschmerz, Anyone?
    Page Paul Hein
    I, too, am octogenarian, subject to weltschmerz (melancholy). It's natural, I suppose, as we get older, to think of childhood and youth ("simpler times") with wistfulness. Because The-Good-Old-Days were filled with an anarchy, or liberty, few of us questioned. It was "what we had". We had not yet been faced with the challenge of child rearing and the need to become "good" parents. "Good Providers" etc etc. Our needs were mostly met by others -- non-invasive others -- others who loved us and cared for our well-being (in spite of their constant nagging and bellyaching for us to "behave"). The-Policeman-Was-Our-Friend. The Germanic folks had some other techniques by which they made indelible a condition we here at STR have come to call "statism". The use of terms such as "the-rulers" (or, more obnoxiously, "our rulers") is one example. The-Rulers do not exist -- "they" are superstition. Well, they might be your rulers (I can't speak for you), but they are not "our" rulers. I remember early in my trek toward anarchy I almost took the opportunity to move lock, stock and barrel to Costa Rica. I had the means by which to do that. My sister-in-law did. She finally ended up in Belize. She owns a large (and I guess prosperous) resort there. After two divorces and leaving everybody she loved and cared about (and who loved and cared about her) behind. Somehow it came to me that if I were ever to become free I had to be free. Here. Where I am. Now. Thanks, Mark Davis (and all you other Root-Strikers -- wherever you ended up). It gradually began to sink in that all "government" was illusory in nature, but with dangerously armed defenders. That war was produced, promulgated, and the health of what we call "statism", or the state. Once that hurdle was overcome I could treat psychopaths hiding under the mantle of "the state" in the same manner that I recognize rattlesnakes. When I go to the woods I wear boots. And I watch where I reach (I got bit when I was young on my left hand, the fang and surgery marks still remain). Basic precautionary measures -- same as if I take a trip to the area of the Gulf Coast or other places near "borders" (fictitious lines in the sand). I no longer mourn something that never was. Oh, my youth pleasurable enough. I had not recognized the nature of government to metastasize; and, therefore, I "respected" the policeman and the soldier. I've even repented and forgiven myself for my "roll" (I was a draftee). I refuse to resent the ignorant lunatics to this day. The policemen and the border patrolmen probably have among the best jobs in town, and their overtime pay makes it advantageous if I hassle them and "try-to-make-them-accountable". But I'm not going to change my plans to visit relatives in the place they're calling "Louisiana" if I so choose. Sam
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 26 weeks 5 days ago Web link KenK
    The pantywaists in the U.K. won't put an end to all this hoplophobia until the entire population are in Matrix-style cocoons 24/7 dreaming about what a great world they live in. It might now be too late for Old Blighty.
  • Anarchoblake's picture
    Anarchoblake 26 weeks 6 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    I've tooken to creating new words myself, and the most entertaining part is when I hear the mass of children I work with using them. As far as teacher exemplifying what's wrong with america, working at a school deigns those in the profession as the most hobessian and totalitarian among us. They would be elated if they could beat the kids, as their resource officers are allowed to do.
  • tomcat's picture
    tomcat 27 weeks 7 hours ago
    Weltschmerz, Anyone?
    Page Paul Hein
    Modern Media bundles several "Trans"-Minorities which are quite different from each other and puts them in one sack. I dare to say that many of the people inside this sack have at least one thing in common.They are more of the calm kind and are trying their best to maintain a low profile, yet in the Media usually a pesky and nerve-racking Drag Queen is presented as a prime-example for this whole bunch of people. "Only a few decades ago, such behavior would have been considered madness, if, indeed, it was ever considered at all." Oh these good old days! You know what happened in the 1930ies up until 1945 in Germany if someone got to know your little secret?.->Gassed and burned!. Even after WWII in Western Democracies you had good chances of imprisonment and forced medication. Additionally you had in all countries what the German Nazis called "Gesundes Volksempfinden": The Judgement by the Lynchmob provided that all the members of the mindless herd had the "proper moral values" in their hearts.Sentenced to harassment, physical violence, even killing. During my younger active Sporting Days(Olympic wightlifting and Powerlifting) I got to know two women with "a boy inside" who "mutilated" their Bodies with excessive Wightlifting. Today I have one "Kathoi" Ladyboy in the Family of my wife. These Human beeings dont do harm to anybody. You dont have to like these people or understand them. But if you have any Ideas about "re-educate", punish them or make them go away by the means of the bad old days then you are utterly wrong.
  • mjackso6's picture
    mjackso6 27 weeks 21 hours ago
    Weltschmerz, Anyone?
    Page Paul Hein
    I really could give a fig less about folks expressing whatever gender-bending proclivities they feel, or any noises for or against that others might make, so long as those aren't shoved down my throat (no pun intended) with the caveat "or else!" added. Unfortunately that's exactly the state of affairs these days.
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 27 weeks 1 day ago Web link KenK
    No more cricket games. Got to get rid of the bat.
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 27 weeks 1 day ago
    Weltschmerz, Anyone?
    Page Paul Hein
    Paul--"Have the Church leaders surrendered their teaching of morals to the rulers?" The thrust of your dismay seems to have answered that question buried in the sentence above. It is being taken away from them are not surrendering. Local authorities challenge and arrest persons (in certain geographical locations, for holding bible studies), legislation is introduced to force churches to hire persons of deviant behavior as pastors, or youth leaders, Chaplin's in the military are being dismissed (the Navy one got his job back though). I cannot remember all the items under the bill they are attempting to strangle religious belief while promoting Islamic faith, then of course there is the House Boy pretending to be President? How many crimes against the nation has he committed under his "Fundamental transformation of America"? It seems clear and obvious that the House Boy is leading this fundamental transformation of America via any avenue he can find. Every tragedy, the House Boy finds a use in fundamentally transforming the nation. Had this creature not been elected I honestly believe we would not be faced with half the problems we are currently seeing. I know many on STR boo me for having anything to do with the Constitution, but as I have studied it, the Constitution would work if and only if the men and women elected would full-fill their oath to it, however, there are many legislators ignoring the Constitution as Representative Paul Ryan has clearly implied, but that is not the topic.
  • John deLaubenfels's picture
    John deLaubenfels 27 weeks 1 day ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    I feel kinda bad for the teacher, who is cast into a role of exemplifying What's Wrong With America, all because of a quick half-apology.   Nevertheless, your point about the timid mindset of most Americans is without question correct.   I enjoy making up new combinations of syllables, and when my wife asks, "Is that a word?", I always answer "It is now."  
  • tomcat's picture
    tomcat 27 weeks 4 days ago Web link KenK
    Consequently the next step to safety would be to take their lighters and matches away and let them eat their food only with plastic cutlery.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 27 weeks 5 days ago Web link KenK
    Molon labe!
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 28 weeks 4 days ago
    A Paradise Lost
    Page Anarchoblake
    Your article hints at my ongoing slogan, "if it's going to be, it's up to me". Whether I'm in Walden or just wandering out to the local corn or cotton patch, I've gotta be free. Nobody can make me free. That's up to me. Nobody can stop me from being free. Like you, I enjoy seclusion -- being away from the crowd. Just the thought of going to, for instance, a stadium full of cheering, jeering halfwits nauseates me. Many of those morons pay big bucks to attend "the-big-game", and you couldn't pay me to sit there -- particularly to have to endure the sickening halftime war promotions. I've got the choice if predators want to collect for visiting a historical site. I can decide to pay, or stay away. I tend to sidestep all "historical" sites. Keep striking at the root. Sam
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 29 weeks 1 day ago
    Yes or No?
    Page Paul Hein
    Sam. Liked the "Loner" article. Reminds me much of myself. I can count all my friends on one hand. I have a lot of associates, but very few friends. Former New York Mayor, something Dumberg is here in my state and has gotten some legislatures riled up that they have created legislation to start confiscating our firearms for no legitimate reason and we have no due process to lean upon. Two House bills and two senate bills to be considered. Since we are a state heavy into hunting I am hoping for a special season to be announced. Anyway, when a cop comes knocking at my door he's not selling light bulbs, or checking my special season permit.
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 29 weeks 1 day ago Page Batu Caliskan
    Excellent insights throughout and well written, Batu. In addtion to your fine conclusion, this thought was spot on "In other words, these academics advocate the forced integration of free individuals and cement patterns of coercively-conditioned associations in an attempt to actualize a personal vision of egalitarianism. These thinkers have long admitted to the implausibility of complete material equality between individuals, so the only equality left to consider is the equality between collectives." It is difficult to know how much of their own bullshit most academics truly believe, but they sure milk assigned collective divisions for all they're worth.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 31 weeks 3 days ago
    Yes or No?
    Page Paul Hein
    This is a couple weeks old, but since nothing's going on here nowadays I'll reflect a thought or three. I abstain from multiple choice exams. That includes yay or nay questions. The writer(s) of the exam(s) will virtually always redirect "bad" thinking (in her opinion) to "more acceptable" thinking. Participants are thus not-so-surreptitiously propagandized throughout the entire gamut of multi-choice testing. This works nicely in the case for the state (which does not exist -- only psychopaths hiding behind that abstraction exist). One can grade a ton of multi-choice easily, which makes them popular. Plus, if one of your superstitions is "statistics" you can arrange large numbers of square pins in round holes without anyone challenging the linear representation. That's handy. All multiple-choice questions are loaded. They can be nothing but. As a repentant government ("public" ha ha) educator I certainly can see why all questions should be rigged from their point of view. Government "schooling" is in place for that purpose. One of the several definitions of government is "obfuscation" (another is "entrapment" -- another "murder"). "Written will of the legislature" and "Rules-written-by-the-government" are non sequiturs, since "legislature" and "government" are merely collectivist denotations. Only people have wills and can write rules. Reflecting on this has caused me to examine just how far out of mainstream I've percolated in my dotage. Not just in mainstream conventionality, but anarchist and libertarian orthodoxy as well. Paul states that this is a questionnaire for "...my public servants..." If he considers lunatics acting under the guise of senators or "representatives" at a place they're now calling "Missouri" as "his", then my comment is off base. I an commenting from the perspective that I have no "public servants" -- in that part of the world, or anyplace else. The inveterate anarchist inherits the nomenclature of loner. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 31 weeks 6 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    "...It will likely take take many, many generations before enough men will finally believe in themselves and their fellow men such that faith-based institutional violence simply fades away...." The problem, for me anyway, is that I'm octogenarian. I don't have time to wait for "generations" to quell institutional violence. The clock is ticking. If freedom's to be, it's up to me -- not thee. So I've had to learn to be free now. Here. Today. Where I'm "at". I am a sovereign state. I think I first began using the term "state" to stir up and watch the knee-jerk reaction "libertarians" manifest when they hear the word "state". Later it dawned upon me that I'd better get myself into a "state" of sovereignty before I set out to engage in the monumental task of attempting to persuade the other 99.9% that they would do well to take the first step: abstain from beans. Thus, my "sovereign state" -- with borders across which you must not step without my permission (or I wish you wouldn't, since I'm getting too old and feeble to put up much of a fight). In fact, I couldn't (and haven't) even been successful in the task of cajoling my own former Ron Paul supporting kids or grand-kids to cease voting in political elections. I think this next year may show some improvement on that score -- I don't drill them about voting, so I probably won't even know unless they set up a braying for this or that "candidate" for grand wizard of the klan. I did ask one of my sons a couple days ago if he was still active in the local Republican Party (his participation of which gave rise to lots of "grandpa duty" on my part), and he said a vehement "no" -- and that Christa (his wife, my daughter-in-law) has given up her county chairmanship. Alex (from the article): "...But what if we never get there?..." I think you two fellows need to take credit for your own personal efforts -- and understand that you ARE "getting there". Mark, for instance, has been a cyber friend for several years. We've not met face to face, although I've trucked through and past his city many times. Easy to say when you're trucking, "I should stop and look up Mark". Much harder to arrange when you consider time, parking, etc etc. But Mark well knows the effect his old article, "Be Free" had on me shortly after I landed on STR -- and several others as well. I wouldn't try to estimate the number of times I've quoted in various "comments" on other forums the portion: When you go into the voting booth, the only meaningful significance that your action will have is to show that one more person supports the state. ~Mark Davis From Be Free, by Mark Davis July 10, 2005. http://www.strike-the-root.com/52/davis_m/davis1.html Same with you, Alex. All we can do is to do what we can. And take credit for the effort. Sam
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 32 weeks 9 hours ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Alex, I've been thinking along the same lines of late. It is hard to remain positive about even the most wonderful proposals when they remain hidden in plain sight due to seemingly willful ignorance. We continue to shine a light on sound principles for social organization, yet the majority of people pull  blankets over their own eyes trying to avoid the bright light. It is hard to get a critical mass, and I agree that 10% of the population is a good estimate, when people simply refuse to consider ideas that go against the status quo. The bias towards, and emotional attachment to, the status quo social organization results in many seeing it as "reality" or "the real world". Tradition is a double-edged sword that depends greatly on how ingrained a tradition is in a culture. I used to think that the American Tradition/Culture was based on logic and reason elavating the natural desire for personal liberty. But I have come to realize that it is based on lies justifying authoritarian social constructs perpetuated by elite guidance (e.g. worshiping the Founding Lawyers). In short, I no longer expect that the intellectual curiosity and reasoning abilities of the average man is sufficient to overcome a lifetime of conditioning (to respond favorably to their masters). We can open the gates and remove the chains from today's clueless slaves providing guiding enlightenment as to liberty, but they will be afraid of liberty and will not trust their innate abilities to assume responsibility for their own lives. Slavery is, alas, a warm blanket that soothes their fear of the world. Still, men of principle must support what's good and oppose what is evil in spite of whether others see/believe it or not. The libertarian ideal of non-agression, that men should not murder and/or steal, is worth keeping alive until future generations can, perhaps, overcome the superstitions that allow agents of social institutions like the state to get away with murder and theft. It will likely take take many, many generations before enough men will finally believe in themselves and their fellow men such that faith-based institutional violence simply fades away.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 32 weeks 2 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Rappoport brings up interesting stuff. If everybody owns everyone, nobody will have to work for anybody. What a gay life (pun intended). In my dotage I've come to see my life as having been filled with various "fixations". Were I a politician, I would definitely fit what "you-the-people" think of as a flip-flopper. (I ceased years ago wishing to be included in a "we-the-people" collective mentality. Perhaps "you-the-people" is unfair -- I should start using "they-the-people" so as not to include you, presuming you might be of the same sentiment). I've been ultra-liberal, ultra-conservative, ultra-religious, ultra-agnostic -- you name it, I've practiced it. In spades. Since last time I ever participated or voted in a political election (1964 -- over a half century ago, for Barry Goldwater) I've steered a relatively steady course toward anarchy, with some tacks along the way. Of course I had to go through the wailing and gnashing of teeth stage and whining over "our-country-is-declining-into-a-police-state". Later I came to see that the moment I think in terms like "our-country", I've lost my bearings to the course toward liberty. All rulership collectives (dubbed "countries", "nations") harbor the seeds of totalitarianism. Lately "jurisdiction" has been my fascination. There are two ways jurisdiction can be in force: consent, and force of arms. Nobody has enough firepower to subdue and/or rule an entire population, so the science of rulership must weigh heavily upon consent. The early emperors -- our true "forefathers" -- understood this. Étienne de La Boétie also understood this. His treatise is as valid today as it was nearly 500 years ago. It's probably time for more of us to take charge of our own lives and well-being and of those we love. And above all, abstain from beans. Sam
  • mjackso6's picture
    mjackso6 32 weeks 6 days ago Web link Emmett Harris
    "Although “the legislative environment is very hostile today,” the intelligence community’s top lawyer, Robert S. Litt, said to colleagues in an August e-mail, which was obtained by The Post, “it could turn in the event of a terrorist attack or criminal event where strong encryption can be shown to have hindered law enforcement.” There is value, he said, in “keeping our options open for such a situation.”" Gee, anyone care to bet on what the ~next~ false flag event is going to be about?
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 32 weeks 6 days ago Web link Emmett Harris
    How many of "your fellow human (beings)" have any idea of what Albert J Knock knew 80 years ago -- the year I was born? http://archive.lewrockwell.com/orig3/nock1.html Sam
  • emartin's picture
    emartin 32 weeks 6 days ago Web link Emmett Harris
    Why was he murdered by police? Because most of your fellow humans want it that way.
  • richyankee's picture
    richyankee 32 weeks 6 days ago
    Yes or No?
    Page Paul Hein
    Paul, I do believe that this is an accurate strike, at the root so to speak. I question whether the integrity of the intended recipient of this treatment could withstand the treatment. In the context of living in that saturated environment of lies and deceit, can a person recover his senses? It's a pleasant and heartwarming dream, one I have had many times. Yet, there they are, like sick dogs. I'm not suggesting euthanasia. Cheers, Rich
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 32 weeks 6 days ago Blog entry Alex R. Knight III
    I guess we'll have to agree to disagree on this. Never mind; one way or the other, the FedGov did it.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 33 weeks 8 hours ago Blog entry Alex R. Knight III
    Jim:  We've been over all of this before, of course.   That the definition of Silverstein's reference to "pull" might've been subjected to 11th hour revisionism after the PBS special doesn't remove the fact that video has long been public of the detonating flashes on Building 7.  No matter how they want to spin it, 7 was "pulled" with explosives.  If they now want to claim Silverstein wasn't responsible, fine...but they haven't done that, or anything even close.  And Silverstein himself refuses to talk about it any further.  No matter:  One look at the video footage of that building says it all.  Ditto, for that matter, the Twin Towers, but 7 is especially indisputable.   The classic fallback of 9/11 Skepticism seems to always be, "How could the government keep something that big secret for this long?"     Answer?  They have.  How?  I don't know.  I only know what all the rest of the evidence -- over 650 pieces of it -- tell us about the events of that day.  And Building 7 is one of the less ambiguous pieces of the overall puzzle.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 33 weeks 14 hours ago Blog entry Alex R. Knight III
    Following the guidance of Mr Occam, I heard that Mr Silverstein's command "pull" meant that Building 7 seems so unstable that it would be wise to pull out of it those firefighters who were still inside, rather than to advise the firing of hypothesized demolition explosives.   I also heard that  B7's collapse followed not just the many fires raging within, but in particular the destruction of a key support structure at one end, caused by falling debris. Once that end had given way, the weakened remainder followed domino style.   Without question, the FedGov caused the disaster. But it's just not smart enough to execute a plan that complex without flaw and without leakage. It did so by provocation of fanatical Muslims for over sixty years, and then by standing aside, if and when it heard rumors of a pending attack. Its hands are covered with blood, no question; but that interpretation is vastly easier to reconcile with its known characteristic of bungling incompetence.
  • TheMPP's picture
    TheMPP 33 weeks 1 day ago Web link TheMPP
    I thought the author did a good job of highlighting the liberal hypocrisy of someone demanding that he kill himself, with a #LoveWins hashtag. But yeah, he is definitely wigged out.  Hyperbole much?
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 33 weeks 1 day ago Web link TheMPP
    "Blaze" readers could never imagine libertarian thinking. Some might grasp Libertarian-ism (note upper case "L"). Slightly. So the social engineers are having a heyday with religionists over this "gay" thing. Most of us reading this on STR understand: with psychopaths of state penguins are elephants and cats are squirrels. In is out. Up is down. Bad is good. Etc etc etc But this guy is wigged out about it. I mean, "our" government must do something! These gays are taking over for pity sake! Religionists (as I've observed them -- your mileage may vary) simply can't separate human government systems from marriage. For them, it's in the book. So there isn't much sense in discussing this US Supreme Court thing with them. They firmly believe psychopaths in black dresses have "authority" over them. And you. And me. And that's what makes them rather dangerous. Sam
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 33 weeks 5 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Vermont sounds a lot like Oregon. "Liberals with guns"... I spent time living in Wyoming, allegedly the most conservative state in the nation. The personal taxation is less there, but the government is largely supported by the severance tax (on extraction of minerals - which of course raises the cost of those minerals and depresses their market). This gives rise to an (apparently) odd phenomenon, a conservative legislature that spends like a drunken sailor while the state finances remain viable. Yet what happens when the market turns down and the severance tax no longer covers the state boondoggles? We already know, because that happened in the '90's: rather than dumping the spending programs, taxes are raised to cover the programs, that have now developed a constituency to keep them going. Wyoming has the highest per capita government employment in the nation. Bottom line, there really isn't much difference between conservative government and liberal/socialist government.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 33 weeks 5 days ago
    Symbols
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    Sam, back in 1980 I was in Paris. One restaurant had a men's and ladies room in the basement, but the men's urinal was actually outside the two, just a wall of tiles where some water dripped out of a pipe, that the ladies walked by on the way to their room. Then there were the pissoirs on the sidewalks... :-) I mentioned the flag thing back in this article, coming to much the same conclusions as you: http://strike-the-root.com/libertarians-are-nothing-special Flags are much like choosing respresentatives in elections. They are a package deal; the good comes with the bad. But I think most people use them as landmarks to orient themselves with, or to find other members of one's tribe. I too find them not very useful although I have long had a hankering for the Gadsden flag.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 33 weeks 5 days ago Web link KenK
    The inmates considered her services a feature not a bug.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 33 weeks 6 days ago
    Symbols
    Page Alex R. Knight III
    I've watched "symbolism" germinate and grow exponentially over my 80 years. Divide-and-conquer is the agenda. Much of the "gay" phenomenon and sexuality in general is symbolic in nature. "Sexual orientation" only entered the vocabulary in the recent 20 or 30 years. I often wonder of aborigines in the tropics who run around naked all their lives are as perplexed in those areas as we in "civilized" parts of the world -- if they feel a need to ponder over their "orientation". An interesting sidelight: I recently took a job at Wal Mart -- mainly for the daily bike ride and to keep my head oriented (don't have to worry about sex orientation :-]). During my first week while on an errand at the front of the store I decided to duck into the men's room. I went in, all the stalls were occupied. I pushed on one or two to make certain (not wanting to stoop over and peek for feet). Eventually a stool flushed and out stepped a young lady -- in Wal Mart garb, one of the gals working in the front. I was petrified! I rushed out, looked at the door (thinking, "...what the hell is SHE doing in the MEN'S room for pity sake???...") I had walked into the ladies room of all stupid, embarrassing blunders(!). In the back where I work the men's is on the right. In the front the men's is on the left. Easy to mistake when you're in a rush and not using your head. But also symbolic. What's the big deal about using the bathroom that every owner of public establishments has to invest in two separate bathrooms? Pretty soon they'll also need a separate one for gays, and I suppose one for transgenders or transexuals or whatever they're calling themselves nowadays. In Japan when I was there in the 50's men and women used the bathroom together. There were no "men's" and "women's". The bible-belt culture has now forced them to westernize, I suppose. Between religion and sex, it's a wonder any of us have remained sane. Sam .
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 33 weeks 6 days ago Web link Serenity
    Thanks for posting this brilliant essay by Murray Rothbard. Seems it might have been on the board in the past, but not recently. It is so easy for anarchists and/or libertarians (I've yet to read a viable definition outlining the difference) to become soothed into thinking that if "we" just get more heavily involved in the state (politics) at some level, "we" might just make a difference. Perhaps "we" should all go back and start voting again -- see if "we" can help the voting public to do "our" civic duty and get a higher grade of elected officials this time around -- if "we" will all just pitch in (and get all our friends and neighbors involved also). Not. I used quotes around "we" in deference to an excellent article written some years ago by Jeff Berwick. The article disappeared from the archives of his website once he began to dabble in partisan politics (he and Walter Block). There may be no connection between his dabbling and the disappearance, but I felt at the time that it was the most effective article Jeff ever wrote. I googled a copy that happened to be preserved at a non-related Yahoo Group forum. You can read it here: https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/FPE/conversations/messages/61165. As I see it, the prime enemy of "the people" is their faith (dependence) in central political "authority" -- the state. It is that faith that must be exorcised. The "authority" (there is no authority if there is no faith) appears about to implode upon itself, and will no doubt take many casualties in its wake. Until that takes place we are relatively powerless to put an end to the abstraction we call "the state". But faith is the real enemy. That is something we can identify and address. Rothbard in this article "contributed his fair share" (pun intended) toward exposing the state -- the large group of psychopaths who make up that brainless abstraction. Sam