Recent comments

  • Log from Blammo's picture
    Log from Blammo 29 weeks 6 days ago Web link Westernerd
    I'm wondering why Reason felt the need to needlessly interject "already underpaid and underappreciated" into their narrative about police. That is emphatically an editorial opinion, and it conflicts with the narrative that police are routinely killing family pets without provocation, remorse, or consequence in multiple cities of the U.S. And police are hardly homogenous across the whole country. Andy Griffiths--if they even still exist anywhere--may be underrated, but I imagine that some residents of Albuquerque would opine that their cops are murderous swine, and overappreciated, while California residents may wonder why ex-cops, retired at the ripe old age of 55, are drawing 6-figure pensions. Hitting that phrase was like stepping into a deceptively deep pothole in a wintry parking lot.
  • Log from Blammo's picture
    Log from Blammo 30 weeks 1 day ago Web link A. Magnus
    The pig/chimp hybrid hypothesis actually made me laugh out loud. It suggests that a "geneticist" is unfamiliar with how species work. The essence of humanity is not the sum of its DNA. I, for one, would not mind tinkering with my own genes. For instance, if I were to assemble a retrovirus that targets the phi-GULO pseudogene and repairs it, using a gene copied from practically any other mammal, my liver would begin producing vitamin C and peroxide. Is that "corruption"? It seems to me that the corruption was losing that capability in the first place, and having insufficient interbreeding humans to repair it from within our own gene pool. This particular djinn is already out of the jar. If you need to be alarmist, bang the gongs against misfolded protein prions arising from newer sciences such as preoteomics. It takes significant computing resources to calculate how a given gene sequence translates to a particular protein, and even more to design a protein and calculate backwards to a gene that creates it. This is coming within our grasp. If you are afraid of animal DNA corrupting the genome, cower in horror at the prospect that we can now design entirely novel genes. Why, imagine what could be done! You could design a venomous baby! Make a virus that kills only the Miller family! Cure a profitable cancer! There's really no more to fear here than any other potentially useful technology. You will likely not even notice it, unless your child chooses to become a bioengineer.
  • eugenedw's picture
    eugenedw 30 weeks 1 day ago Web link A. Magnus
    Mostly alarmist nonsense. As for Dr. Eugene McCarthy, I have to wonder whether he even exists, and if so, when last he has taken his medication. :-)
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 30 weeks 1 day ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    If you send your kids into the belly of the beast for "education", you can't complain over this sort of thing. Homeschool. Sam
  • Sharon Secor's picture
    Sharon Secor 30 weeks 1 day ago Web link Sharon Secor
    You're right, the illegal zip-lock bags was humorous, all things considered. However, I should say, since it seems you're writing from South Africa, that I'm pretty sure the law doesn't apply to standard use sizes, like sandwich-sized, quart and gallon. I'm betting that what is illegal in that state are what you have to ask for using the term jewelry bag in most other places, the tiny ziplock bags that people sell small amounts of pot and other substances in. But, who knows, I don't ive in that state and there's no telling what drug war zealots have made illegal there. They very well may have legislated against all ziplocks -- you know, think of the children and all.
  • eugenedw's picture
    eugenedw 30 weeks 2 days ago Web link Sharon Secor
    Cops abusing their power to enrich themselves is pretty much standard practice in Third World states all over the planet, including here in South Africa. We have lots of street vendors here, and for the most part, their businesses are technically illegal, though often tolerated. But now and then, out of the blue, the cops raid them, kick over their stalls, and blatantly steal their merchandise. I have to say though that what I found the most astonishing about the article was that it is illegal in Pennsylvania to sell zip-lock bags! Well, that one made me laugh - it sounds quite literally like something out of a Monty Python sketch.
  • wkmac's picture
    wkmac 30 weeks 5 days ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    You might also want to add this lady to the list. http://www.macon.com/2014/05/14/3097249/former-nw-georgia-judge-indicted...
  • eugenedw's picture
    eugenedw 30 weeks 5 days ago Page John deLaubenfels
    The thing is, in the modern world it has become so difficult to enforce copyright that the law has in any event become somewhat irrelevant, whether we like it or not. Then there is this bit: "Yes, J.K. Rowling would probably have made enough from writing Harry Potter books to justify her efforts, but struggling writers would be pushed from barely eking out an existence into giving up writing, if theft were legalized." ---I doubt this very much, because who would bother to copy the work of a failed writer? It's the successful books and movies and music that get copied. "Failed writers in the past are not seen today, and so it is easy to pretend that they never existed, provided one has sufficient motivation to do so." ---But did they fail because they had no copyright protection, or did they fail because they were just not very good at writing things that people actually wanted to read? One must in any event take a look at the history of copyright law: it was never intended as a way to reward writers. Right from the start, it was a tool for the state with which to exercise control. Then there is one last point: to enforce copyright law costs money, which the state gets from me. But personally, I have no use whatever for copyright law. So why the heck should I pay to have it enforced? If you don't want your stuff to be copied, don't publish it. It's that simple.
  • eugenedw's picture
    eugenedw 30 weeks 5 days ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    This is it! I am patenting oxygen! ("A new method for using oxidation in the generation of biochemical energy.") You want to breathe, you'd better pay me first...
  • eugenedw's picture
    eugenedw 30 weeks 5 days ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    I notice that he heads an organization called Stop Common Core Nevada. Now, if he spends all the time and energy that he lavishes on that organization on educating his own kids instead, he wouldn't have so many problems...
  • eugenedw's picture
    eugenedw 30 weeks 5 days ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    There is one thing that should perhaps be brought up here. I wonder how many of the victims described in the article, if you had interviewed them just an hour before they became victims, would have approved of the idea of a powerful government. How many of them are anarchists? How many became anarchists or libertarians after they fell victim to the system? Should we necessarily have much sympathy with statists when they become the victims of the very thing they so fervently approve of? Either way, it may be useful to start a sort of contact organization, that makes a point of contacting victims such as the ones mentioned in the article, and then attempt to convert them to anarchism. They might make easy converts. :-)
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 31 weeks 14 hours ago Page Lawrence Samuels
    We've all heard that truth is the first casualty of war. Once conflicts begin to arise people in their own hearts begin to rewrite history. I think the reason we tend to do that sort of thing is because often we're not happy with what we said or what happened or what we did. So we'll lie awake in bed at night rewriting the script of what happened the preceding day. We'll spend that hour or two or maybe three hours before we wind up getting to sleep at night rehashing the scene, justifying what we said -- explaining to ourselves why we did certain things. And in the process of it we'll come to believe something entirely different about what happened from what really happened. Most of us also agree that war is the health of the state. German National Socialism (NAZIS) and Italian Fascism are about war. Almost all of what we know of as "world history" defaults back to war. Because war is what grand wizards of states do. And virtually all of history is flawed -- self justification. Even sincere writers like yourself have to try to decipher the machinations of questionable sources. And you can rest assured Wikipedia is not overseen by tame, truth-seeking volunteers. Here is a classic example. Dr. Andrew Wakefield has been exonerated by many substantive studies, but Wiki will not take down their falsehood. Lots of recent articles regarding the manipulation of web content and search results by Google and the majors. I don't envy your attempt to seek valid information concerning a conflict that has been raked over by multiple millions of "authors". WWII "buffs" proliferate even 75 years hence. The late Harry Browne had this to say about the divide-and-conquer left ("liberal") vs right ("conservative") phenomenon: Conservatives vs Liberals Conservatives say government cannot end poverty by force, but they believe government can use force and threats of violence to make people moral. Liberals say government cannot make people moral, but they believe government can use force and threats of violence to end poverty (redistribute wealth). Neither group attempts to explain why government is so clumsy and destructive in one area but a paragon of efficiency and benevolence in the other. ~Harry Browne Liberty A-Z p 35 Sam .
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 31 weeks 16 hours ago Page Paul Hein
    "Apparently, the fact that they have written down their wishes justifies their belief that I must obey them. Why?" It's a religious thing. We need to find out what the rulers want, and do the opposite, as much as we can. It's for our mental health.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 31 weeks 16 hours ago Page Lawrence Samuels
    It's funny leftists don't want to own up to this, but they undoubtedly have to account for Lenin and Stalin, so not all is lost. I suspect they are recasting Mussolini and Hitler as rightists to have enemy icons that everybody can hate. Easier than making Locke or Jefferson into an enemy! But the left-right notion is not very useful after all. Leftists often sound like rightists and vice-versa, so that over the long run there seems little difference. Its utility seems to boil down to a "divide and conquer" tactic by the ruling class, and little else. Those folks in Wikipedia ought to be a bit more careful. Having a bias is not good for the reputation of encyclopedists (or whatever they are called). Next time they hit me up for a donation I will have to refer them to your article.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 31 weeks 17 hours ago Page Paul Hein
    From the essay: "Freedom is impossible when assorted strangers claim the power to dominate you--and you accede to their demands." The key phrase here is "...and you accede to their demands..." I'm an advocate of what's called the "Serenity Prayer" -- where a Power greater than I is asked to help give rise to... "...the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, The courage to change the things I can, And wisdom to know the difference. I'm an over-the-road trucker. You mentioned Jefferson City, indicating you're Missourian. I stopped at a restaurant down in Kennet, MO, one day last fall. As I was sitting there I sensed there was something different about the place. Then it dawned on me: there were ash trays on the table with butts still in them. Then I looked around and realized several of the customers were smoking. I felt like standing up and cheering! Kennet is located far down in the "boot-heel" of MO (almost in Arkansas on two sides, and within 20 miles of TN to the east). I figured the owners must have decided to ignore the state "law" against smoking, calculating the psychopaths probably wouldn't venture that far into the remote outreaches of MO to "enforce-the-law". Like you, I'm not a smoker. In a free society I would be one to choose a "non smoking" cafe -- or one with ventilated zones for smokers. Smoking is an act that takes into consideration nobody but the smoker. The owner of the establishment, however, is the only individual who can legitimately allow or ban smoking, based upon his or her ability to satisfactorily accommodate both types of customers. Your property is not our property. Anybody who says otherwise should be ignored when practicable. Sam
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 31 weeks 17 hours ago Web link A. Magnus
    You can turn an old computer into a router that is not so compromised, by loading it with pfsense. See pfsense.org.
  • eugenedw's picture
    eugenedw 31 weeks 1 day ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    Glock: When I was a kid, I knew old folks who harvested some rain water from their roof in an open tank. Soon after the rain, sediments would settle in the bottom and the water was crystal clear. Certainly good enough for washing, and if you boil it, you could surely drink it too. Even from a smallish roof and in a fairly dry climate, you can harvest thousands of liters of water from your roof every year. If, that is to say, you don't get arrested for doing so.
  • eugenedw's picture
    eugenedw 31 weeks 1 day ago
    The National Non-Debt
    Page Paul Hein
    Around here (South Africa) there are lots of jewelry stores that sell necklaces made of 9 carat gold. These are fairly cheap, and the chains are rather simple in design and machine-made, so I would guess that most of the value resides in the gold itself rather than the value added by turning it into chains. It seems to me that these may be an affordable way for people who live on a very low budget (like me!) to invest in gold, and should there be an economic collapse, bits of such chains can easily be snipped off and used as medium of exchange. But I don't really know - would be interested to hear further comments on this.
  • Thunderbolt's picture
    Thunderbolt 31 weeks 1 day ago Page Paul Hein
    Dr. Hein: This is really striking at the root of the entire game! Glock is correct here also. Who gave them the authority to take your money? Jim Davies has created a list of various government employee types, to whom one can send an explanation about how their employment is immoral. It is to be found on his Anarchist Alternative site.
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 31 weeks 1 day ago Page Paul Hein
    What about all those IRS agents who received healthy bonuses and don't pay taxes. How do they do that? I don't want to pay taxes, but they will be after me if I don't and then take double or tripple that in fines, fees, and other hidden costs.
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 31 weeks 1 day ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    I like that Sam. Seven to eight cars ahead. I would venture two to three cars behind is that is managable, the of course there are those side roads, but your eyes should have noted them a long way back. I do hope your eyes and ears are far better than Mine, I am one of those who needs seat belts and a knife to cut the belt to get out.
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 31 weeks 1 day ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    I like that Sam. Seven to eight cars ahead. I would venture two to three cars behind is that is managable, the of course there are those side roads, but your eyes should have noted them a long way back. I do hope your eyes and ears are far better than Mine, I am one of those who needs seat belts and a knife to cut the belt to get out.
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 31 weeks 1 day ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    Why not start your own garden using heirloom seeds and saving those seeds, Next year another species and so on till you have your seeds. I do it every year and never spend a cent of packaged seeds. Have you seen the price they are asking for just ten itty bitty seeds?
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 31 weeks 1 day ago
    Never Say Die
    Web link Bradley Keyes
    I thought that waas a science fiction piece, B grade movie. You are always in my thoughts Sam.
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 31 weeks 1 day ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    Ha! That s--t has already started in Michigan. The Michigan Agricultural Commission has now extended to local authorities to criminalize gardens, small animals as chickens, rabbits and goats. You have to be, currently, 250 feet away from your nearest neighbor. If you are a suburbanit and raised a garden your days are numbered here in Michigan. Not much different than Colorado criminalizing catching rain water in buckets or barrels. (P.S. If you catch rain water from your roof, please don't use it. Birds and squirrels and other critters poop on your roof and it all comes down into your barrel)
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 31 weeks 1 day ago
    The National Non-Debt
    Page Paul Hein
    If you do not mind Paul. Would you share with us what form of monetary exchange you are using. Some say I am stupid, but I am collecting bottels and bottle's of liquor as my medium of exchange for what I need. I just picked up a bottle of 12 year old scotch for half the price listed. In times to come I am guesstimating it will be worth three times the face value. Of course if you don't drink I could be poop out of luck. I would go tobacco, but that goes bad in a short period of time unless you can freeze it. Toilet paper is a good one also, but for now I an standing over the edge of the cliff with an alternative under me.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 31 weeks 3 days ago
    The National Non-Debt
    Page Paul Hein
    "What passes for money today is not mined, or extracted from the earth. It is created by the banks with a few keystrokes." What is amazing to me is how long this farce continues. Print up some paper notes with dead presidents on them, and people continue to take them indefinitely - because others continue to take them as well, and because they can "always" be traded for things of actual value. Until they can't. And even those who understand the farce won't last forever, continue to use them. We are like those cartoons of Wile E Coyote, who has just run off the cliff in pursuit of that annoying bird, standing in mid-air with nothing beneath us.
  • eugenedw's picture
    eugenedw 31 weeks 5 days ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    One can only hope that enthusiasts of heirloom varieties will create an underground network in which seeds are exchanged for other seeds, or freely given away. Of course, that will also be illegal, but far more difficult to control than commercial operations.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 31 weeks 5 days ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    Just now I posted a rant at another site over Yahoo's attempts at "big brotherism" (and my distaste for that entire collectivist robotic phenomenon) -- overriding my links with "drops" that have been programed with their recent formatting: "we-know-what-you're-trying-to-say-better-than-you-know-what-you're-trying-to-say". My kids accuse me of just being old, senile, and resistant to change. I accuse them of robotic collectivism. Somehow I think we're both (all -- I've got 7 kids) correct. Collectivists (particularly state costumed and dangerously armed DOT and Highway Patrol types) incessantly chant slogans: "Seatbelts-Save-Lives!" etc. Their mission is to pull truckers over (most of whom know more about highway safety than any or all of them individually or collectively will ever know) for, of all stupid things, "safety checks". Of course parasites are not the least concerned they're taking up an hour or more of your precious drive time -- their hourly pay from the monopoly upon violence that employs them is quite arresting (pun intended). "Police Presence" is their byline ("we're watching you!"). It is important to them that their flashing lights present a warning to all onlookers -- along with their swagger. They didn't teach the swagger when I went through State Patrol Academy in Virginia in the 50's (as a condition of receiving an early discharge from the military). As far as "seatbelts-save-lives" goes, the only way by which a seat belt can save your life is if you're slamming into something or somebody. If you plan on that, I recommend them. What is going to save your life is knowing what's going on 6 or 8 car lengths ahead and avoiding the accidents unfolding out front of you. But, like in the article, one might retort: "...b...but what about the guy who plows into you?"; to which I respond: "if you're not professional enough to have seen that coming, you're one who should definitely wear a seat belt!" Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 31 weeks 5 days ago
    Never Say Die
    Web link Bradley Keyes
    Blammo: "...You can twist your brain up in knots on that one..." I'll start with makin' it to 1,000 (I'm near octogenarian now and counting up fast) -- will I still suffer the perplexity of racking my brain to remember why it was I came into this room??? :-( Sam
  • Log from Blammo's picture
    Log from Blammo 31 weeks 5 days ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    I'm glad that America would never submit to such foolishness. No, in America, the law would close that blindingly obvious "seed club" loophole by also criminalizing mere possession of unregistered plant material, rather than just sales to the general public. This seems like more Codex Alimentarius nonsense, and we have already been repeatedly told that it was not just the first step on a slippery slope. Yet here we are, making seed merchants into criminals, by political decree. I'd like to catch the bus to interstellar space, please. Earth is doomed. And also apparently full of dangerous unregistered plant material.
  • Log from Blammo's picture
    Log from Blammo 31 weeks 5 days ago
    Never Say Die
    Web link Bradley Keyes
    You will die, eventually. At some point the energy gradient of the universe will no longer be sufficient to support the computational demands of human consciousness. When the whole sky is dark, and you are floating in an unending expanse of cold iron dust, and you haven't yet worked out how to get yourself to a younger universe, you just might not make it another trillion years. My point was that the only way to achieve extreme longevity is make it so that we don't need to check off a thousand items on our survival checklist every day. It has to be automatic, divorced from conscious intent. It doesn't have to be genetic. We could have tiny programmable machines in our bodies doing all the work instead of natural cellular activity, but at the moment, that solution is more difficult than genetics. But even then, we have no idea what causes of death might crop up in people who live to be 200, or 1000, or 100000 years old. You don't know it can kill you until someone dies from it. It may well be that 1000-year old humans can die unexpectedly because they simply remember too much, and a millennium of memory entangles itself to the point where any common, everyday stimulus biochemically cascades into catatonic episodes of drowning in your own memories. You might have to selectively forget things in order to live normally. And if you have to forget the first 500 years of your life 1000 years from now, isn't that almost like the you that you are now is dying in the future, even though the body goes on? Your past self is killing your future self, so your future self has to murder the past self to survive. You can twist your brain up in knots on that one.
  • Log from Blammo's picture
    Log from Blammo 31 weeks 5 days ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    It is ethically unacceptable for the software designer to allow the resulting program to select an intentional collision decision rather than pruning it. If a collision is truly unavoidable, the only choice for the automaton to make is no choice. Stay in the current lane of traffic, apply the brakes, and minimize damage to the passengers in its cabin. But if either other car is also machine-piloted, the situation changes. The center car can broadcast an urgent warning and request for assistance. This communication can take place many times faster than human reaction time. The other pilot programs can plot a safe way to provide the center car with an accident-avoidance path, as an alternative to minimizing the damage from an unavoidable collision. From the human perspective, when the giant pipe hits the road in front of the center car, several different cars swerve simultaneously, like schooling fish around a dolphin mouth. Traffic behind the obstacle parts and moves around it, slowing immediately to a speed safer for the new condition of the roadway. But without that new information from other machine pilots, the pilot has no choice but to accept the inevitability of a wreck, and simply minimize the damage to itself without trying to dump it on someone else. In reality, the hypothetical is not going to happen. If you are allowing your AI to make an impossible choice with all bad outcomes, you haven't done your job as a programmer. Part of your piloting software should always be evaluating safe contingency paths. And that means not cutting off your escape options by driving between two human-piloted cars in the first place. I even do this as a human driver. I try to be aware at all times of which direction I can swerve if I need to. Most of the time, it's to the right, onto the hard shoulder. If I don't have multiple possible travel paths, it's time to slow down and try to open my options back up. So no, the robot car of the future will not be programmed to hit you. It will be programmed to treat you like a dangerous maniac that is actively trying to maneuver it into assuming fault for an accident. If you match your speed to it, it will change its own speed to get away from you.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 31 weeks 5 days ago
    Never Say Die
    Web link Bradley Keyes
    Blammo: "...We cannot make ourselves live forever..." What you don't understand, Blammo, is that the world revolves around MY belly-button, not yours. My world. Thus, if I die (note I did not say when I die) I'll take the world with me -- including "forever" (well, time as I know it). The advantage of this outlook is in the knowledge that YOUR world revolves around your belly-button, whether you acknowledge it or not. That helps me to understand that you didn't get out of bed this morning looking for ways to denigrate or find fault with me. Is this a joke? Not. It is, as I see it, the root of libertarian philosophy. Everything else is muck-raking. Sam
  • Log from Blammo's picture
    Log from Blammo 31 weeks 5 days ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    One jurisdiction down, 50+ to go. Civil forfeiture, as the federals and most states do it, is one of the most unjust and corrupting procedures condoned by the U.S. justice system. Hopefully the change will not only persist, but also spread to other states.
  • Log from Blammo's picture
    Log from Blammo 31 weeks 5 days ago
    Never Say Die
    Web link Bradley Keyes
    We cannot make ourselves live forever. All we can do is discover additional ways to die and avoid them. The specifics of how to avoid them change subtly when you look at different people. The great thing about encoding those specific methods into DNA is that those methods can then be carried out without conscious thought, and without additional economic activity. It becomes free and automatic. The tremendous advantage can be seen by analogy. Imagine two people. One breathes normally. The other must constantly expend conscious effort to inhale and exhale, and must also remember to breathe faster when doing something strenuous, and more slowly when relaxing. The second person has to remember to use an artificial respirator every time they go to sleep. Their friends and co-workers have to be aware that if they ever fall unconscious, to begin pulmonary rescuscitation immediately and unconditionally until the person regains consciousness or until help arrives to take over. A dearth of oxygen exchange in the lungs is just one way to die. Now multiply that difference in effort by thousands of folded proteins and enzymatic pathways. And now try to remember to do something to avoid dying that you didn't even know you had to do in the first place. It really is a great advantage for your body to take care of all that stuff automatically. Unfortunately, it is not a profitable business to identify and transplant those genes that automatically mitigate some cause of death. Pharmaceutical companies derive more revenues from treatments than permanent cures. Open source biology is the only way the genetic advantages of centenarians will ever filter out to the general human population. What if instead of taking an ever-changing list of pills to survive just one more year, you could get an injection of re-engineered cells that would last for decades? The only path to that future is spending the research money now, as an investor, rather than later, as a drug-dependent customer.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 31 weeks 6 days ago
    Never Say Die
    Web link Bradley Keyes
    Megan Scudellari: "...life expectancy soared in the United States over the last 50 years, thanks to better health care and expanded use of vaccines. Medicine today provides my generation with a carefully curated set of healthy-living guidelines: if I don’t smoke, and if I run two miles a day, eat more vegetables and less meat, get regular health screenings and drink a glass of red wine every night, I’ll have a real shot at dancing at the weddings of my great-grandchildren..." Can't resist playing my normal anarchist "devil's advocate". The late Delmar England phrased it this way, which is much better than I can come up with: Truth + truth = truth. Fallacy + fallacy = fallacy. Truth + fallacy = fallacy. There is no compromise. The author did not -- could not, must not -- appeared duty-bound to avoid saying this: "Stay away from doctors and hospitals" So, like most popular fallacies, Megan contributed her share by attributing "healthy-living guidelines" to "Medicine" (the almighty g-d) -- and implied that "...expanded use of vaccines..." were a part of the puzzle leading to longevity. "Science" (much -- most -- tax-funded) craves that I believe in "genetics" as my magic elixir to staying healthy to 100+. Think about it: "...But what if there was a way to distill the essence of this genetic lottery ticket? What if you could pop a pill that would give you the same protective benefits?..." The enormity of the truth is incredible. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 31 weeks 6 days ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    Thanks for posting this, Bradley. AAPS is to the medical establishment much like STR is to mainstream media. Licensing and "board certification" are merely barriers to entry. They serve neither your interests nor mine -- but they do augment the presumed legitimacy of that mindless abstraction we like to call "state". Butler Shaffer describes this in detail with "In Restraint of Trade..." Sam
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 32 weeks 1 day ago Web link Emmett Harris
    I suppose one could say "Better late than never," but I'd be really pissed at the ones who took my life away when I got out.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 32 weeks 1 day ago Web link Emmett Harris
    How many of you are surprised at this? Angry? If you are, I submit you're allowing a large group of psychopaths organized into that mindless abstraction called "the-state" to have too much emotional control over you. Nothing to be done for this poor chap who has been fried by psychopaths. But you can take measures to protect yourself. For starters, abstain from beans. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 32 weeks 2 days ago Web link Sharon Secor
    Not only are your children now our children, your fetus is now our fetus. How long will it be before your semen becomes our semen? Or your sperm....or your penis....or your vagina....well, you get the picture. Sex gets everybody's attention. Collectivists play the sex-tunes with supreme artistry. And the memes abound. Sam
  • Steve's picture
    Steve 32 weeks 5 days ago Page Steve
    Ilya Somin generally agreed with Haidt's findings, but with some caveats that I found reasonable: http://www.volokh.com/2012/10/01/the-libertarian-personality/
  • livemike's picture
    livemike 32 weeks 6 days ago Web link Westernerd
    What baseball is really about: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qmXacL0Uny0
  • eugenedw's picture
    eugenedw 33 weeks 2 days ago Web link Sharon Secor
    We have a similar situation here in South Africa. Partly to protect us against ourselves, and partly through sheer greed, the government has, over the past decade or two, levied ever increasing "sin" taxes on tobacco and alcohol. Result? There is now a huge underground market for smuggled cigarettes, and of course, a whole new class of criminals has been created, and this in a country that already suffers from one of the highest crime rates in the world.
  • Thunderbolt's picture
    Thunderbolt 33 weeks 2 days ago
    The National Non-Debt
    Page Paul Hein
    Dr. Hein: Beautiful explanation of the perfect con game. Of course the government will, post collapse, try to steal anything tangible, to pay themselves.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 33 weeks 2 days ago Web link Sharon Secor
    No doubt those who push these taxes have Mafia connections so they can profit off the smuggling.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 33 weeks 5 days ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    No doubt the R's will beat him up for doing this. If in fact he does it.
  • mkghandi's picture
    mkghandi 33 weeks 6 days ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    Normally if a bully approaches you on the street and does everything in his power to intimidate you and pick a fight with you, how do you extricate yourself from that situation? Talk to him? Try and reason with a bully? That's like negotiating with a terrorist. No matter what you do, the outcome will be the same.
  • eugenedw's picture
    eugenedw 33 weeks 6 days ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    I have on occasion shown my own (primary school) students how to make gunpowder. I'd probably not last long in an American school, and may well receive a transfer to a school in Guantanamo Bay... :-)
  • mkghandi's picture
    mkghandi 34 weeks 17 hours ago Web link A. Magnus
    This is what I call the "Caecescu Moment". It was that moment in December 1989 when then Dictator of Romania gave a speech to a very large crowd outside his palace, and the young kids booed him. That set off a revolution, and by Christmas, he was tried and executed. I remember that look on his face when the crowd booed him for the very first time. He was completely surprised by it. And now, the dictatorial NYPD have had their Caecescu Moment on twitter, and although I can't see anyone's face when it happened, hopefully they got the message about peoples non-existent positive feelings about them.