Recent comments

  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 28 weeks 3 days ago Page Hogeye Bill
    Intended to address Terry Hulsey's comments regarding "intellectuals". So I'll make a second comment: Gary North had an excellent essay regarding the intellectual mentality some years ago. You can read it here: https://www.lewrockwell.com/2011/03/gary-north/those-lying-textbooks/ Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 28 weeks 3 days ago Page Hogeye Bill
    Interesting interchange. My take is that once "we" embark upon the daunting task of "libertarian" (or "anarchist" for that matter) "theory", we lose the ability to divest from collectivism. Freedom sidesteps theory. Terry Hulsey: "...ownership...of free land would be determined by whom?..." Exactly. We had a participant a couple years ago on this forum that got himself thrown off (I think -- anyhow he abruptly disappeared). "White Indian". I liked White Indian because he was crazy (like me). And he "thunk". Injun was the nemesis of the "theorists". He and I both fit what one judge once diagnosed me: pathological nonconformist. Injun harped on the idea of land ownership from the standpoint of the original settlers in this land-of-the-free. Hundreds -- perhaps thousands -- of years ago. They were tribes with chiefs and with medicine men who were revered (just like politics -- the state -- is rather worshiped today by the white man). They formed no central political authorities charged with "determining" who owned the land upon which they hunted and they gathered herbs. They were mostly migratory. The white man labeled the various tribes and groups of tribes "nations". That was the white man's only mentality. He could not divest from collectivism either. But the natives of this part of the world did not fit the general category of "nation". They had no formally defined "borders". Where men and their families set up their tepees were their homes. Until it was time to move to where the wildlife had migrated for the season. And fight -- they fought like a bunch of libertarians, as I understand history. They fought among themselves over wells and buffalo herds and hunting grounds, but not "borders". That was the white man's purveyance -- forming political alliances and defining borders. And fighting wars. And taxing "citizens" (producers). And determining who could live where and travel where, etc etc etc. Oh White Indian, where art thou? Sam
  • Terry Hulsey's picture
    Terry Hulsey 29 weeks 5 days ago Page Hogeye Bill
    Mr. Hogeye, Your article for unrestricted free immigration rests on two propositions: * That radicals for property would limit free speech; * That radicals for property living in a world where states exist wrongly assume that the state can be proxy landowners for taxpayers, or anyone.   On the first head, I do state that radicalizing property rights to abolish public property would revolutionize the meaning of free speech. First of all, as no one realizes, the intellectual would cease to exist. The intellectual is an institutional construct of a world of partially public, partially private ownership. His sole function is to be the advocate of how public property is to be disposed. In the absence of public property, he would be replaced by the (privately-funded) expert or by the scholar, whether working as an amateur or on behalf of some school. A discussion such as the one we are having would only have the status of a pleasant conversation among friends, with no bearing on the determination of public policy.   Regarding the second head, it's possible that a lost bundle of cash that was originally stolen may not have a titled owner. This is not the case for most, and possibly all, federal land, since the original owners are a matter of historical record.   But let's assume for argument that there exists at least some land without clear title. Both sides want to avoid the irresolution of an unending, and possibly violent, search of history for the "rightful owners," which would do nothing but spawn a blab fest over the meaning of "rightful."   Let's grant the wish of those who want to return this land to homestead status.   Ownership after this rush of "Sooners" into this bonanza of free land would be determined by whom? Immediately rejected by both sides is the possibility that the state can claim property in its own right. That leaves only two possibilities: Either determination is by the state as proxy for yet-to-be-settled owners, or there is no determination at all. In the latter case, the contending homesteaders would be left to "settle it among themselves" as to who got there first. It is puerile fantasy, in the current context, to assume that they would have their insurance agents or private security firms sit down to tea and crumpets for a polite resolution of the matter. (This truth does not denigrate the natural evolution of such agents in a longer context.)   Therefore the only reasonable possibility is that a proxy state, without right to property of its own, would determine ownership on behalf of others to whom it would give title, peacefully fixed and assured. This same argument for a proxy state applies to all current policy matters, until the state can be replaced by anarchic institutions.  
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 29 weeks 6 days ago Page Hogeye Bill
    'land illegitimately held by government belongs to a collective of “taxpayers” who are the “true owners.” ' I too think Hoppe is wrong here, but (perhaps) not quite in the way you do. There is nothing wrong with the notion of "collectively-owned" land. In a free society, a town may own the town square collectively, with each of the townspeople (if they want) a shareholder. One can think of various ways for this to take place without any coercion. Such a town square could have any kind of restriction on its use that the true owners pleased; everything from "No immigrants allowed" to "Immigrants welcome; set your tents up on the north side." Where Hoppe goes wrong is imagining that ALL government land is owned by all the taxpayers. There is no way for this to take place, for the land to devolve to the control of the actual owners, in a free society without coercion. To homestead the land, even if you plan to later cede or sell it to a collective, you have to be there and work it. Impossible with all government land; there's too much of it. He also goes wrong in depending on "representative" government to administer that land, as the notion of representation in government is completely bogus, a logical impossibility.
  • GregL's picture
    GregL 29 weeks 6 days ago Page Hogeye Bill
    Excellent retort to the "Hans Hermann Hoppe" school of libertarian immigration theory.
  • GregL's picture
    GregL 30 weeks 21 hours ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Very well-done and professionally made short videos of politicians squirming to pretend there is no contradiction in their claim to authority.
  • D. Saul Weiner's picture
    D. Saul Weiner 30 weeks 3 days ago
    Say It Isn't So!
    Page Paul Hein
    Ah, the compassion of the California commies: Mandate the disclosure of the coercion of children used in producing chocolate. Next, mandate the coercion of parents into injected their children with poisons that could disable or kill them (vaccines) in order to attend any type of school or day care (SB 277). Hypocrisy, thy name is California.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 30 weeks 4 days ago
    Say It Isn't So!
    Page Paul Hein
    Screw California. Those guys have voted for this kind of nonsense for decades and they can just live with it now, assuming that they even notice.
  • Log from Blammo's picture
    Log from Blammo 30 weeks 4 days ago
    Say It Isn't So!
    Page Paul Hein
    Without legal tender laws, the Federal Reserve Note would have to be redeemed with either United States Notes or coin stamped out by the U.S. Mint.  However, as the legal tender laws allow tender of Fed notes to discharge debt obligations, and a Fed note is itself a debt instrument, the Fed can discharge the debt represented by the note by giving back more Fed notes.   It is a bit crass to return to the bearer *the same note* that they just handed over for redemption, though.  Technically, ownership of the note is not negotiated until *after* the obligation is satisfied.   And equally technically, a dollar (or peso de ocho [reales]) is "coin silver" (0.900 Ag, 0.100 Cu), with total mass from 400 to 500 grains.  The U.S. standard is 416 avordupois grains (26.96 g), which gave the U.S. silver dollar slightly higher seignorage than spanish silver dollars, which were the global trade standard at the time.  This definition was valid for centuries.  Now, you need 11.13 Fed "dollars" to get one actual dollar.   False advertising?  Hell yes.
  • Kevin M. Patten's picture
    Kevin M. Patten 31 weeks 1 day ago Page Kevin M. Patten
    Thanks Glen! Yeah, I can understand why someone worried about false flags and mass surveillance would be happy that they both had some cinematic exposure. I'm lucky to live in a time when many activists and people know about this stuff.  Something I didn't really point out in my review was that most of these crimes can't really be done by "rogue outfits" -- "SPECTRE" or ISIS or even Anoymous for that matter. Most of the time, the ones doing the monitoring and the terrorism aren't sitting in a basement or a garage or wherever; it's the State and big corporations like Facebook and AT&T who are partnering up, as you pointed out. That's not to say that terrorism isn't being committed by people unconnected to the fascist State. But these are important distinctions to keep in mind. Cheers. 
  • ReverendDraco's picture
    ReverendDraco 31 weeks 2 days ago
    I Don't Get It
    Page Paul Hein
    "I can’t recall hearing anyone suggest that they simply be denied those benefits, although I will surely admit that someone might have suggested it." We tried in California back in 1994, with Prop. 187 - some silk-robed cretins decided that it wasn't legal for Californians to refuse to allow some foreigner to come and mug them under color of law. Which has caused an approximately $10Bn budget shortfall in Cali: $23Bn paid out to illegals in "benefits" minus the approx. $13Bn in taxes generated by the few Criminal Trespassers who "work" for a living.
  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 31 weeks 2 days ago Page Kevin M. Patten
    Nicely done! You make good artistic and political points.  I will say that personally, I appreciated seeing corporatist-engineered false flags put front-and-center in a popular film with a huge audience. The Bond franchise has always made money glorifying the State's violent "intelligence" apparatus; in SPECTRE, the roots of this violence are at least put in the spotlight. False flags aren't new, no, and neither is the fascist government/corporate "partnership" that long ago replaced the American republic (as of the adoption of the Constitution, I'd say), but many people still aren't willing to accept the awful truth. Smedley Butler would approve of SPECTRE's storyline, I think.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 32 weeks 5 days ago Page Paul Bonneau
    I should mention one other group profiting from this government intervention. There appear to be several "advocacy" groups whose supposed mission is to lobby for renters (against landlords) in the legislature, but that are probably more concerned with fund-raising to support the staff of those groups. Sometimes the human race seems to be nothing more than one gigantic, complex scam... I notice Wendy McElroy linked to this article. Thanks, Wendy!
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 32 weeks 5 days ago Page Paul Bonneau
    Woops, I goofed, pasting this comment on the wrong article.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 32 weeks 5 days ago Page Paul Bonneau
    One of my fantasies. Wife wouldn't go for that, however. I might just have to get out on my own now and then. BTW flyover country is little if any better than Oregon. I lived in Wyoming for a while. Rather than being free, it was unfree in a way somewhat different than in Oregon.
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 32 weeks 6 days ago Web link KenK
    Because they are smarter than the remainder of the unwashed masses, we are stupider to I guess because we can't act, can't dance, can't sing, can't lie, or maybe it is the fact that they recognize most of us can see through their smoky mirrors. To conclude, stupid is as stupid does! That was the stupidest remark I have ever read. I noted today on "Jews for the Protection of Gun Rights" they listed by nation the highest rates of mass shooting, contrary to the House Boys remark earlier this week. The U.S.A. ranks 8th with mass shootings, and what I garnered from the article these other countries out ranked the U.S.A. in numbers killed.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 33 weeks 3 days ago Web link KenK
    Why is it always the plutocrats, politicians, Hollywood types, brass-hatted cops, etc, (who all have personal entourages of security and/or unrestricted personal armed carry privileges for themselves) who lecture the rest of us that guns dont make us safer?
  • Douglas Herman's picture
    Douglas Herman 33 weeks 5 days ago Page Paul Bonneau
    Paul, Brilliant from both sides of the argument, but mostly from the smalltime owner/ renter/ landlord POV. Get a van; live in it as you both work; sock away bucks. Move to smalltown in FlyOver Country. Problem, Reaction, Dilution.   Doug
  • Log from Blammo's picture
    Log from Blammo 34 weeks 23 hours ago Web link KenK
    That hypothesis is not the one preferred by Hanlon's Razor: never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity.   The more information you collect, the more reduction and analysis you need to do in order to make sense of it.  The signal-to-noise ratio inherent in collecting all communications on the Internet is so incredibly low that you would need a legion of analysts to put together a story that makes sense.  Even with megabuildings packed with server-quality computers, the bottleneck is still in acquiring employees that know what they are doing, and are willing to do that kind of work.   Compared with the private sector, the government pays peanuts and demands so much more.  About the only way they can get skilled programmer-analysts is to train them up from their own military and then move them to a defense contractor that can offer pay not tied down by the government employee pay schedules.  Even then, a Manning or a Snowden might start to feel slimy and blow their whistle.   I feel confident in saying that no, nobody detected it.  It was an attack with man-portable explosives and small arms on targets of no military or infrastructural value.  It fell outside the "defended area", so the initial automated screening algorithms never flagged it for human review, or it was never passed on to any group that could act on the intelligence.   They didn't ignore it because it suited their purposes to let it happen.  They ignored it because they don't actually care about that kind of thing in the first place.  Governments just don't care about protecting the servant classes from attack, except to the extent that it makes them appear weak.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 34 weeks 2 days ago Web link KenK
    Shotguns are nothing to be sneered at, but an AR-15 is much more versatile. All freedom lovers should be armed.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 34 weeks 2 days ago Web link KenK
    Another possible explanation is that they DID detect it, but allowed it to proceed because it suited their purpose (that's assuming it was not a false flag).
  • Mark Davis's picture
    Mark Davis 34 weeks 6 days ago Page Glen Allport
    Word.
  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 35 weeks 1 day ago Page Glen Allport
    Thanks, Bill! And good point: the gub'ment kills way more of us than the terr'ists do.
  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 35 weeks 1 day ago Page Glen Allport
    Well, if love and freedom are difficult thoughts for people who are "unsettled and vulnerable", I suppose they can always turn on Fox News and get the security and predictability of the Power Elite viewpoint. Heard a few snippets today as I walked past the television, and some of those Fox geniuses were insisting that Obama quit being such a pussy, worrying about civilian casualties Over There, and bomb the *bleep* out of ISIS camps where those crafty women and children are living. (Seriously!) Can't win a war without some collateral damage, you know . . .
  • mkghandi's picture
    mkghandi 35 weeks 2 days ago Web link KenK
    HIGHWAY ROBBERY
  • Bill St. Clair's picture
    Bill St. Clair 35 weeks 5 days ago Page Glen Allport
    Unsettled and vulnerable? Why? Because eight nutjobs killed a handful of people in France? Horrible, of course, but no threat whatsoever to my life, unless the government amplifies it and brings it here. The crashing of airplanes into the World Trade Center towers (or whatever really happened) was also no threat to my life. The TSA, however, created supposedly in response to that atrocity, threatens me every time I need to use a commercial airliner. Nice thought piece, Glen.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 35 weeks 5 days ago
    I Don't Get It
    Page Paul Hein
    @paul bonneau Yeah sadly everyone's a libertarian until it's their rice bowl that's being messed with.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 35 weeks 5 days ago
    I Don't Get It
    Page Paul Hein
    "The only rule for the government ought to be the denying of benefits to the “illegals.” Indeed, one should question the legitimacy of providing federal “benefits” to anyone, illegal or not." The first is not a solution, since it props up the institution of welfare. The second is the correct solution. Government SHOULD NOT pick winners and losers in the free bennies sweepstakes. Instead if it does anything at all, it should invite all and sundry. If we can't kill welfare through the ballot, maybe we can kill it through over-subscription. Of course it is silly for me to say what government should do. For some reason they don't seem to care about my opinion. We will just have to wait until a crashing economy solves both the welfare and immigration problems. BTW I have been shocked at how many libertarians (e.g on lewrockwell.com) have looked to government to solve this government-created problem. I guess their support of liberty has its limits.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 35 weeks 5 days ago Page Glen Allport
    People feel unsettled and vulnerable right now Glen. They crave security and predictably rather than bromides from Chinese philosophers. People are just in no mood to hear this right now. Not an attack on you I'm just sayin.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 36 weeks 12 hours ago Web link KenK
    Whoa. My bad. This is what the link should have taken you to http://www.wired.com/2015/11/tor-says-feds-paid-carnegie-mellon-1m-to-he...
  • Log from Blammo's picture
    Log from Blammo 36 weeks 2 days ago Web link KenK
    Bitcoin was never even intended to last by Satoshi, the pseudonymous creator.  It has always been proof-of-concept to pave the way for the next iteration of cryptocurrency, to discover the problems such a successor would need to solve.  For instance, the fixed block size has been shown to be vulnerable to a "dust DoS" attack. When any government finally takes hostile action against Bitcoin, it will just make itself a problem to be solved. Bitcoin is fine for experimentation in virtual currencies, but no one should be throwing all their commerce into it, as it has always been a temporary measure.  The future will include Bitcoin, Ethereum, Ripple, and alternatives that haven't even been invented yet.  The Holy Grail of cryptocurrency is one where you can issue your own notes or coupons, backed by something you have or something you can do or make, that automatically propagate through your personal trust network to the point where you can buy commodity goods with it.
  • Log from Blammo's picture
    Log from Blammo 36 weeks 2 days ago Web link KenK
    Link is broken.  Try these:   https://blog.torproject.org/blog/did-fbi-pay-university-attack-tor-users http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2015/11/tor-director-fbi-paid-carnegi... http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2015/11/fbi-the-allegation-that-we-pa...
  • mjackso6's picture
    mjackso6 36 weeks 3 days ago Web link KenK
    Sorry for the multiple post. Not sure how that happened.
  • mjackso6's picture
    mjackso6 36 weeks 3 days ago Web link KenK
    "We are trying to pass legislation that would require cities and townships to comply with the law" WTF?! So we're working on passing a law to make other lawmakers obey the law?! The sad thing there is that I doubt that the average Joe even sees anything wrong with that bass-ackwards oxymoron of a sentence, much less breaks out snickering when they read it (my immediate reaction). Sometimes I swear that I know exactly how Nero felt when Rome burned... Guess I need to learn how to play a fiddle while I still can...!
  • mjackso6's picture
    mjackso6 36 weeks 3 days ago Web link KenK
    "We are trying to pass legislation that would require cities and townships to comply with the law" WTF?! So we're working on passing a law to make other lawmakers obey the law?! The sad thing there is that I doubt that the average Joe even sees anything wrong with that bass-ackwards oxymoron of a sentence, much less breaks out snickering when they read it (my immediate reaction). Sometimes I swear that I know exactly how Nero felt when Rome burned... Guess I need to learn how to play a fiddle while I still can...!
  • mjackso6's picture
    mjackso6 36 weeks 3 days ago Web link KenK
    "We are trying to pass legislation that would require cities and townships to comply with the law" WTF?! So we're working on passing a law to make other lawmakers obey the law?! The sad thing there is that I doubt that the average Joe even sees anything wrong with that bass-ackwards oxymoron of a sentence, much less breaks out snickering when they read it (my immediate reaction). Sometimes I swear that I know exactly how Nero felt when Rome burned... Guess I need to learn how to play a fiddle while I still can...!
  • mjackso6's picture
    mjackso6 36 weeks 3 days ago Web link KenK
    "We are trying to pass legislation that would require cities and townships to comply with the law" WTF?! So we're working on passing a law to make other lawmakers obey the law?! The sad thing there is that I doubt that the average Joe even sees anything wrong with that bass-ackwards oxymoron of a sentence, much less breaks out snickering when they read it (my immediate reaction). Sometimes I swear that I know exactly how Nero felt when Rome burned... Guess I need to learn how to play a fiddle while I still can...!
  • mjackso6's picture
    mjackso6 36 weeks 3 days ago Web link KenK
    "We are trying to pass legislation that would require cities and townships to comply with the law" WTF?! So we're working on passing a law to make other lawmakers obey the law?! The sad thing there is that I doubt that the average Joe even sees anything wrong with that bass-ackwards oxymoron of a sentence, much less breaks out snickering when they read it (my immediate reaction). Sometimes I swear that I know exactly how Nero felt when Rome burned... Guess I need to learn how to play a fiddle while I still can...!
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 36 weeks 4 days ago Web link Westernerd
    Sounds like a must-see movie to me!
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 36 weeks 4 days ago Web link Westernerd
    "Here to stay"... sounds like those guys predicting in 1988 that the Soviet Union would last forever.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 36 weeks 4 days ago
    Weltschmerz, Anyone?
    Page Paul Hein
    "difference between the way things are, and the way they should be." There is no "should be". There is only the way we (individually, and differently) prefer them to be. If "they" outlaw cash, who cares? Just get around it or ignore it. It's probably going to flop shortly just like everything else they try. Remember when FDR confiscated gold? How many actually turned it in? Don't we now have gold, if we want it? "Our rulers seem totally oblivious to the destruction they are wreaking..." I don't think "oblivious" is quite the right word. They simply don't care. BTW Sam, I use the word "ruler" as a synonym for "parasite". "Even worse, if that’s possible, is the acceptance by so many Americans of this homicidal behavior." Why be surprised? The indoctrination apparatus is gigantic and entrenched. Anyway I think you mistake resignation for acceptance. Most people think we should get out of Afghanistan, etc. Most individuals understand their opinion on the matter affects nothing. As to people getting creative with gender issues, why is that anyone else's business? Yes, public figures always will generate comment, no problem there, but for the rest of them? I look at that and I see liberty, even if I might question the aesthetics or taste.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 36 weeks 4 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    I don't think of America as an experiment, much less as an experiment that failed (anyway experiments do not fail in the usual sense, but simply by failing to convey accurate information, in which case they are simply called "inconclusive"). I am in the process of reading this book: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0300152280?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_... In it, the author makes the case that states were difficult to set up in SE Asia since they depend on concentrations of exploitable humans in compact areas - in that case, where rice cultivation predominated. Well, what was America? In effect, one gigantic rice paddy. The population shot up like a rocket, production became enormous, and vast amounts of cash started flowing toward the governments. Is it any wonder we ended up as we did? How could it have gone otherwise? There is no failure here (other than the fantasies of constitution, "rights" and all the rest). There is just the normal progression of human societies. There *are* some differences, that I have written about here: http://strike-the-root.com/how-americans-are-exceptional And there are no doubt other differences. Are they enough to steer us into new territory, something different than the normal human progression? I believe so, but at my age, I won't be around to see. Oh well...
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 36 weeks 4 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    "I feel kinda bad for the teacher..." Ha ha. :-)
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 36 weeks 4 days ago
    A Paradise Lost
    Page Anarchoblake
    In my drives through Oregon, I once ended up here: https://www.google.com/maps/@42.77176,-120.3734781,2632m/data=!3m1!1e3 I got out of the car. There was no wind, no con trails in the sky, no birds, nothing. Just blessed quiet. I felt like the last man on earth. The only sign of human presence was a little-traveled gravel road. I just stood there for a while, basking in the nothingness. It's strange that such a nowhere place remains in my memory. I can definitely agree that a person needs solitude now and then.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 36 weeks 4 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    As Thoreau nicely put it, "Trade and commerce, if they were not made of India rubber, would never manage to bounce over the obstacles which legislators are continually putting in their way; and, if one were to judge these men wholly by the effects of their actions, and not partly by their intentions, they would deserve to be classed and punished with those mischievous persons who put obstructions on the railroads." It's hard to imagine the human race without markets. I suppose it is in our genes...
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 36 weeks 4 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Why all the pessimism? I see all sorts of changes in the direction of liberty. Hang out in any forum for a number of years and you can detect it. Yes, there is a lot of doom and gloom out there, and yes the state is using every means possible to cement its position, but that is natural in "end of empire" times. It's all a house of cards. "The vast majority of the population have never even considered our ideas." As a distinct, complete program, you are right. But that is almost never (in my opinion) how ordinary people learn. They accumulate bits and pieces of the truth over time, without even realizing what is going on. I think you are way too pessimistic. But even a pessimist can follow Sam's prescription.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 36 weeks 5 days ago Web link TheMPP
    Google It For Your Self how a book code works if you want to know more.
  • Kevin Van Horn's picture
    Kevin Van Horn 36 weeks 5 days ago Web link A. Magnus
    I think that the "catastrophic" and "anthropogenic" parts of "catastrophic anthropogenic global warming" are probably being exaggerated, especially the former, but I also think the comment accompanying the article gives a bogus argument. There is both considerable year-to-year variation and considerable geographic variation in temperatures. You can't conclude much about long-term global temperature trends from one data point like this.
  • Brian Mast's picture
    zygodactyl 36 weeks 6 days ago Web link TheMPP
    Please expand what you mean by GIFYS because I can't find any meaningful search engine results that explain what that acronym means in terms of communicating with other individuals privately. Written books are usually intended to be read by many people and therefore your mentioning them has no obvious relevance to my comment. It seems to me that only a Statist busybody snoop would question my "want or need" for anonymity at an Anarchist website.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 36 weeks 6 days ago Web link TheMPP
    A simple "book code" (GIFYS) is way easier to use than all this stuff if you really want or need that level of privacy.