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  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 26 weeks 2 days ago Page Paul Hein
    Thanks, Paul. Those are all good quotes. I do have to agree that on some days I do not feel like a slave either. On others, however, I feel the full weight of the imposition of government, and perhaps even more daunting, the failure to recognize it among so many people in our society. There is that wonderful book by Milton Mayer, entutledd They Thought They Were Free, about life in Nazi Germany. In many ways, it supports your thesis Because as we sink gradually into the swamp, we lose our sense of what it was like without the swamp in our very nostrils!
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 26 weeks 2 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    For some reason, Oklahoma is kinda weird about guns. In Oregon it is commonplace for legislators and ordinary peons to carry guns in the capitol building.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 26 weeks 2 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Good article, although the author for some reason assumes that there can be such a thing as a legitimate government.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 26 weeks 2 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Well, if we've ever paid a federal income tax, he's already seized some assets. Anyway he's already given himself permission to kill anybody he pleases. I guess I am not going to worry too much about this. I won't keep my trap shut about any damn war either.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 26 weeks 2 days ago Page Paul Hein
    Assange, Snowden and Manning angered powerful and evil men. That is the way to describe them, rather than calling them slaves. I tend to use the word "peon" a lot, to describe our status. I think it is more accurate. There is a tendency to suggest that a single restriction is enough to transform us from free to slave. Although I definitely think that the time to rebel is not when the thousandth restriction is imposed, but when the first is imposed, I still can't look at that as slavery. It is an imposition. Here is a quote I like, by John Dickenson: "Indeed nations, in general, are not apt to think until they feel; and therefore nations in general have lost their liberty: For as violations of the rights of the governed, are commonly...but small at the beginning, they spread over the multitude in such a manner, as to touch individuals but slightly. Thus they are disregarded...They regularly increase the first injuries, till at length the inattentive people are compelled to perceive the heaviness of their burdens. They begin to complain and inquire - but too late. They find their oppressors so strengthened by success, and themselves so entangled in examples of express authority on the part of their rulers, and of tacit recognition on their own part, that they are quite confounded." Of course to be (involuntarily) governed at all is itself a huge imposition. Dickenson was no anarchist, but he makes a point. The time to fight an imposition is at the beginning, ideally. Of course for us, that is a rather theoretical situation. I don't know, I just don't feel like a slave; maybe I'm just being stupid. But here's another way of looking at it: http://strike-the-root.com/government-force-of-nature
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 26 weeks 2 days ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    Sharon, thank you for writing and sharing your experiences with your own children. When I think of contemporary events and look for an answer to the question, Why? I am reminded of what Butler Shaffer writes in his books--and more particularly in Wizards of Ozymandias:   The state owes its very existence to the success it has in fostering division among us. Divide and conquer has long been its mainstay in political strategy. Blacks and whites. Christians and Muslims. Employees and employers. Straights and gays. Men and women. In this separation, the state gains power by exploiting fears and promising its protection.   Taking Butler's lead, we can take it a bit further. The government is always ready to launch a new war to stampede us into fearful obedience, subservience, and worship of the state. As George Orwell showed in his novel, 1984, there will always be a Bernstein to serve as an "official enemy" for us to officially hate and fear. The list of these enemies is long and grows longer each day: A war on drugs. War on poverty. On terror. Intolerance. Child slavery. Skateboarders run amuk. Guns. Lack of "healthcare access." Saturated fats. Goldstein. Goldstein. Goldstein!
  • Sharon Secor's picture
    Sharon Secor 26 weeks 2 days ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    The concept of calling things what they are is one I've been discussing with my children and other people on a regular basis for years now. I encourage the use of very plain, simple language because it brings the message home so much more powerfully. Euphemisms, big words, and pretty language muddy the waters, hide what things are in many cases. Calling things what they are brings clarity to any situation and helps a person to see situations and people for what they are. It is a valuable tool in establishing personal and political values, as well as for decision making in difficult situations.   I stumbled onto the concept years ago, answering questions for my children when they were little. Explaining racism and slavery to a 4-year-old, using words small enough for her to understand, I wept... the small words made it all so raw, so ugly. (No, sweetheart, those children never saw their mommies again...) That child remembers Martin Luther King Day more, I suspect, because it was the first time she'd seen her mother cry than the for actual historical significance of the day.   Simple words reveal the essence of a person. What kind of person chooses to work in a position in which he or she violates the rights of others? What kind of people join professions and inflict pain and humiliation upon others while violating their rights or protect those in their profession that do? Our political "leaders" are murderers (often mass murderers), thieves, and liars. What rational, moral person would feel an obligation of loyalty or obedience to such people or their laws?   Often people ask me what I mean with the phrase/title "Practicing Resistance and Raising Revolutionaries." Teaching the next generation to see things clearly and call them what they are, to resist having their vision and intellect clouded by truth-masking euphemism and propaganda -- I believe these to be among the most important revolutionary acts a person can perform.   Best Regards,   Sharon Secor  
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 26 weeks 3 days ago
    M for Malaysia
    Blog entry Jim Davies
    Now that the Feds (alleging help from Rolls Royce) have declared that MH 370 left Malaysia in controlled flight heading West, that ass of a Prime Minister has laid the blame on the pilot(s).   That's my first pick too, and has been since Tuesday; but he made no mention of the other possibility - that it was hijacked. If hijackers got through his government's security net, he would be to blame; whereas pilot integrity is mainly an airline responsibility.   What a creep! These government morons perform no useful function at all.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 26 weeks 3 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Psst! Hey, Vlad, trade in Bitcoin!
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 26 weeks 3 days ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    Sorry, Paul. I must have been mistaken.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 26 weeks 3 days ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    Wow, Lawrence, I sure don't know how you got that from my story. I'm not advocating anything of the sort. It's just an anecdote, from 1980 when I hadn't even heard of libertarianism. But even with this imperfect example, it's clear the (entirely) free market would be just as capable of providing security. Not only was this not an example of a uniformly applied government solution, but I'm now someone who does not fly at all, which is arguably better than what you've come up with. If everybody did what I do, TSA would be ended instantly. If everybody did what you do, it wouldn't put a crimp in the TSA at all.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 26 weeks 3 days ago
    M for Malaysia
    Blog entry Jim Davies
    This morning's news shows that the Malaysian investigators are beginning to follow that lead which I gave three days ago - they are searching the Captain's home, and may soon check that of the co-pilot.   They are still looking all over the world, however, instead of checking Mecca first. Of course I could be wrong about that, but once one understands a bit about governments and religions, it tells one where to look first.
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 26 weeks 4 days ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    As late as the 1970s, people boarded flights at LaGuardia Airport with rifles.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 26 weeks 5 days ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    "airlines were forbidden to enact their own security measures without the blessings of big government."   In the coming free society each airline will of course be free to make whatever safety regulations it wishes, so that the market can express its preferences. Soon after 9/11 I wrote this column, including the suggestion that on entering a plane the host(ess) might say "Welcome aboard! Would you care to borrow a loaded handgun for the flight?"
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 26 weeks 5 days ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    Paul: As I am sure that you will concede, there is a difference between being able to choose to fly with one air carrier as opposed to another and being forced to undergo the molestations of the TSA without any choice. Surely you will recall that airlines were forbidden to enact their own security measures without the blessings of big government. That is how all of this began because of the failure of government control. So it is not quite honest to compare the actions of the government's tax subsidized coercive monopoly and the actions of a competitive marketplace. You have had the opportunity to tell stories about your need to be touched by another human being, even if it was a molestation in an airport. I think that it would be a mistake to try to determine policy for everyone else on the planet because of your needs.
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 26 weeks 5 days ago Page Paul Hein
    Paul, perhaps you just were not very effective in communicating your displeasure about previous presidents. Here are two facts of history. First, Julian Assange is an effective prisoner because he was very effective. Second, Edward Snowdon is also an effective prisoner because he, too, was very effective in letting the powers that be tell about themselves. And a third fact that we can too easily forget. Bradley Manning is in prison because he also was very effective. I recall that when I was in a seminar in graduate school, the president of the Pontifical Institute once said to the class that he was not sure that we were any less serfs or slaves then the medieval peasants. He did not think that he was exaggerating. Slavery and serfdom are all very indistinct concepts. One bleeds off into another. They are complex, and they have multiple dimensions. Let's try not to simplify them too much by basing them up on our limited experience. What is the point of all this? It does not always come down to our own personal experience. The world is much bigger than that.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 26 weeks 5 days ago Page Paul Hein
    Eh, I'll throw in a discordant note, as usual. This kind of piece is OK for libertarians, but I'm guessing it's "a bridge too far" for everybody else, just like Molyneux calling us farm animals. It's just not going to make the sale. It's one thing to say "this looks like slavery" or "this approaches slavery in some respects", another thing entirely to say "this is slavery" or "we are slaves". Beyond the selling points, there are some factual problems. 19th century slaves could indeed sing and dance - until the overseer told them to stop. Buying homes, I don't see how that can be considered slavery in any way. And I have routinely, harshly criticized about every president I was aware of, with no ill effects but with more likely a pat on the back.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 26 weeks 5 days ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    I don't fly any more, for exactly this reason. I have an anecdote I wrote down earlier though: -------------------- Back in 1980, I was working for the French office of an American computer company, and this office covered not only France but also much of Europe and the Middle East. At the time I was in “customer service”, not only installing machines but often fixing them on the spot by troubleshooting them down to the component level with an oscilloscope or logic analyzer - no board swapping for us. One time I had to fly to Tel Aviv to install a machine. El Al flew out of Orly Airport which was near where I was living, south of Paris. When I got there I found that check-in was in the basement; if any Palestinian wanted to blow himself up along with some El Al passengers, he didn’t need to be on a plane to do it, so the airport manager put them downstairs to minimize the damage if that happened. Of course such considerations remain beyond the ken of our stalwart TSA “protectors”. Part of the boarding procedure was a pat-down, my first ever. I went inside a curtained-off area and some Israeli Army private did the deed. It never occurred to me to protest or to be annoyed about it, not only because it seemed a reasonable precaution, given the times; but also because she was an absolute knockout, one of those black-haired, olive-skinned Sephardic beauties. In fact, by the time I left the curtains, I was smiling. No, no, she was quite proper about it; the smile was my imagination at work! Unlike what the TSA does today, I never got the impression that there was some hidden agenda behind the whole thing. It was just what it appeared to be, and I actually did feel safer because of the El Al and Orly Airport procedures. I didn’t get the feeling that the procedures were done for pointless political considerations, nor that it was done for the financial benefit of some ruling class crony, nor that the idea was to create yet another constituency of loyal feeders at the government trough, or make-work for mental defectives and perverts. I didn’t get the impression the whole exercise was an example of animal training, whereby the rulers train the peons to let their minions lay hands on them for no good reason at all - in fact in Israeli society the very last thing they want is a passive populace, and it is commonplace there to see reservists walking around with M16‘s on their back, waiting for a bus, for example.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 26 weeks 5 days ago Web link Westernerd
    Excellent! We need more shunning of brutal thugs.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 26 weeks 5 days ago Web link Westernerd
    I have submitted a critique of this article to STR.
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 26 weeks 5 days ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    Jim, I like the fact that you like to have a good time over this stuff. A good sense of humor is going to help us get through this.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 26 weeks 6 days ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    “dang it, your right, I quit.”   Marvelous! That's actual progress.
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 26 weeks 6 days ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    I was happy to receive the following two posts from readers who emailed me personally. I thought their experiences were well worth sharing!   WRITER #1 Dear Lawrence: Thank you for your suggestions for dealing with the TSA.  If people weren't such sheep, if they opted out in large numbers, this nonsense would stop.   Anyway, being a clergyman, I always travel in my clerical black attire with a collar.  I like wearing dress shoes and a jacket.  They always looked so stunned when I opt out.   When they ask me if there are any parts of my body that are senstive, I always replay in a deadpan: my testicles.  That's not what they expect the priest to say.  What I would really like to do on those occasions when I can't get out of flying would be to memorize a litany of biological terms for every part of the genital/rectal anatomy and rattle it off in reply. The last time I was gate-raped, I took the opportunity to give a mini-lecture on the 4th Amendment.  I engaged my molester with a lot of questions about the 4th.  He didn't know much about it.  I also told him this was security theater as the last time I flew, the TSA had no trouble finding my testicles but missed the Swiss Army knife in my carry on.     On one occasion, when the blue-glove had me in the crucified position, I saw many people looking on in disgust to see a cruciform clergyman being felt up.  This was during the election campaign, so I mouthed "Vote For Ron Paul" as people looked on in disgust.  When the ordeal was over, my wife could still see me from the other side, and I gave a fist pump in defiance.  I kind of thought I was in for more attention, but I wasn't.   On one occasion, they tried very hard to convince me to walk through the porno scanner, kind of a hard-sell.  I called them on it and asked them why they were trying so hard to make me change my mind, as though they were trying to intimidate me, and asked them whether or not it was my right to opt out.  I further explained that I found their behavior very odd, that they would try to make me surrender my rights.  They backpedaled in a hurry.  On that occasion, they were keeping a log of the number of "opt outs."  There were only like three all day.  Sad. Anyway, just a few thoughts.  I really appreciate your suggestions, especially keeping a few Becky Akers articles at the ready!  Great idea!   For liberty, Reverend X from Lousiana   ------------------------ WRITER #2   One commenter tried to capitalize on a presumed homophobia among TSA cultists:   Some of my favorite moments:   One of my co-workers at Indianapolis Airport when asked if he any questions before his molestation said – “yes, are you gay?”  TSA “I don’t have to answer that” My Friend “Well, I am noticing, women are patting down women, men are patting down men, so there must be a prurient interest in this, so I think I have the right to ask if you are gay.”  He told us to just leave.    New Hampshire – Before I was to be molested TSA asked “how are you today” ME:  “Oh it’s another great day in the land of the free, pretending that the fourth Amendment doesn’t exist” – I’ll be damned, TSA boy guy freezes, and says “dang it, your right, I quit.”  He left, I got my stuff, America got freer.   But my proudest moment was flying out of Spokane, a priest in an ephod went through the scanner, but they still put him in the molestation line, and I’m in line behind him.  This poor young priest is getting felt up by TSA idiot – and I said in my just loud enough to be over heard voice “You know, when you are done with this, you should go to Mexico, become a male prostitute and perform fellatio 5 or 6 times a day.  After about a year, possibly your self-esteem will be high enough for you to work at Wal-Mart as a greeter.”  TSA genius looks at me and asks “what’s fellatio”  the whole room laughed their asses off.    The concluding remark? "No, government groping does not make me feel safer.  Armed pilots on the other hand…”  
  • Emmett Harris's picture
    Emmett Harris 26 weeks 6 days ago Web link Emmett Harris
    Exactly.
  • rita's picture
    rita 27 weeks 11 hours ago Web link Emmett Harris
    Because people who have lived outside the law most of their adult lives are going to line up, hats in hands, and ask "pretty please" to get the drugs they want. And we all KNOW there's no black market in prescription drugs, right? Oh, wait -- here's an idea -- why not let GROWN-UPS decide for THEMSELVES what substances to put into their own bodies?
  • Thunderbolt's picture
    Thunderbolt 27 weeks 1 day ago
    A Threat to the Dollar
    Blog entry Jim Davies
    Amen, Jim. Also, what fun it would be if Amerikans also substituted Bitcoin for the dollar in both domestic and international trade!
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 27 weeks 1 day ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    Sorry but I believe this is all a conspiracy whose effect will collapse the U.S. thrusting this Nation into a broken down 3rd world country and Russia will dominate the world as the U.S. once did. The crux is "Why should any one nation rule over the rest of the world?"
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 27 weeks 2 days ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    Hello, Bradley. Thank you for explaining. Yes, I can now see that I misinterpreted you. I apologize. I think that's my problem is that whenever I turn on the radio to get a weather report, I hear all of this talk about the poor underpaid heroes military, and whenever I see that word I immediately fill in the blanks If there is any other word located next to it that seems to indicate that train of thought. Again, my apologies.
  • ReverendDraco's picture
    ReverendDraco 27 weeks 3 days ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    "If all of these news source have the story completely wrong it's scary to think about how much else we read is wrong." It would only be scary if it were a novel idea. . . but it's so ubiquitous as to be more pathetic than scary.
  • Glock27's picture
    Glock27 27 weeks 3 days ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    How new is that?
  • Bradley Keyes's picture
    Bradley Keyes 27 weeks 3 days ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    I believe you've misinterpreted the posting. The majority of it is simply recent history which few seem to know about but certainly is important I trying to understand the situation. My observation at the end was intended to point out  that they gave up almost all options for self defense in return for promises from the US and Russia to respect their borders. They have now become a pawn with limited options for any hope of self determination. Sorry I was not clearer.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 27 weeks 3 days ago
    A Threat to the Dollar
    Blog entry Jim Davies
    What fun it would be if Russia substituted Bitcoin for the Dollar in international trade.
  • newjerusalemtimes's picture
    newjerusalemtimes 27 weeks 4 days ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    Yes, of course Crimean Jews don't want to be ruled over by a Ukrainian Neo Nazi regime. And if Crimea does rejoin Russia, the Crimean Peninsula and it's people will undoubtedly fare better with the Russian form of statism than the bankrupt and energy-poor regime of the new Ukrainian form of statism. Some Crimea Jews Express Support For Russian Military Incursion in Crimea 10,000 Jews Live Among Ethnic Russians in Enclave "Many Ukrainian Jews took part in the opposition movement centered in Kiev’s Maidan, or Independence Square. Jews participated despite the fact that the protests included far-right activists and some political figures who have been known to espouse anti-Semitic views. But support for the revolution is hardly unanimous among the country’s Jews. "Rabbi Misha Kapustin, whose Reform synagogue in the Crimean capital of Simferopol was recently vandalized with swastikas, acknowledged that some Jews support Russian involvement in the crisis. “In this area there is considerable support for the Russian invasion, and the local [Crimean Jewish] community is very assimilated here,” Kapustin told JTA. “You should take into account the effect of Russian propaganda: the television they watch, what papers they read.” http://forward.com/articles/193832/some-crimea-jews-express-support-for-...?
  • newjerusalemtimes's picture
    newjerusalemtimes 27 weeks 4 days ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    And this one too. I was wondering how long it would take, especially with Washington DC threatening Russia with economic sanctions. So, it didn't take long at all. And I wouldn't be surprised if Russian Natural Gas prices get bumped up for the EU countries too, as China will undoubtedly take any Russian energy export surplus: Russia cancels Ukraine's gas discount and demands $1.5bn "Russian energy giant Gazprom has increased the price of gas supplies to Ukraine, sending a chilling reminder of the power Russia holds over European energy markets. "The price rise comes as escalating unrest in Ukraine threatens to boil over into war – a situation that has already stoked fears of disruption to energy supplies from Russia to other parts of the world. "Gazprom chief executive Alexei Miller said his company would raise prices next month because Ukraine was not able to pay its debts in full, and would owe the company around $2bn if it did not meet its bill for February. "In the past, Russian president Vladimir Putin has granted Ukraine a discount on its gas supplies. However, the deal, which has to be renegotiated every three months, has not been renewed and has handed Russia a mechanism with which to ratchet up pressure on Kiev. "Mr Putin insisted that Gazprom’s decision was unrelated to political tensions. “This makes perfect commercial sense. This has nothing to do with situation in Ukraine. We gave them money, they failed to deliver," he said in a televised conference. “They failed to pay off the debt, I think it’s $1.5bn as of today, and if they don’t pay for February it’s going to be $2bn. So if you don’t pay, then let’s go back to regular prices.” http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/newsbysector/energy/oilandgas/1067622...
  • newjerusalemtimes's picture
    newjerusalemtimes 27 weeks 4 days ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    Here's another development, as the West seems to approve of the Neo-Nazi regime that violently overthrew the elected Ukrainian president, the Autonomous Crimean Republic legislators seems to want no part of that, especially the Russian Jewish sector there. Ha, ha, ha, Putin wins again! SIMFEROPOL, Ukraine (AP) - "Lawmakers in Crimea declared their intention Thursday to split from Ukraine and join Russia instead, and scheduled a referendum in 10 days for voters to decide the fate of the disputed peninsula. Russia's parliament, clearly savoring the action, introduced a bill intended to make this happen. "The Obama administration slapped new visa restrictions against pro-Russian opponents to the new Ukraine government in Kiev, and cleared the way for upcoming financial sanctions, as the West began punishing Moscow for refusing to withdraw its troops from the strategic region that also houses Russia's Black Sea fleet..." http://apnews.excite.com/article/20140306/DACC8FP80.html
  • newjerusalemtimes's picture
    newjerusalemtimes 27 weeks 4 days ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    Yeah, I just posted an article to my FB page from news.antiwar.com, that seems to make it clear now, that the Ukraine developments are apparently a page taken from Obama's attempted regime change in Syria not long ago, which Putin thwarted: Ukraine Protest Leaders Hired Kiev Snipers Snipers Fired on Both Police and Other Protesters "Western officials repeatedly condemned the ousted Yanukovych government for snipers who fired on protesters in Kiev, but it turns out those snipers were actually hired by the protest leaders themselves and told to kill people on both sides to drum up more unrest. "That was revealed by Estonian Foreign Minister Urmas Paet in a leaked conversation with European Union foreign policy head Catherine Ashton. Estonia confirmed the authenticity of the leaked conversation. "Paet was recently in Kiev, and was shown strong evidence to that effect by the main doctor at the protesters’ mobile camp. Dr. Olga Bogomolets reportedly turned down an offer to be Vice Premier of the new regime. "Ashton expressed considerable surprise at the revelation, saying that she hadn’t heard that before. It is unclear from Paet’s investigation who among the protest leaders may have hired the snipers, but the safe bet is probably the neo-Nazi-styled Right Sector, which has since been courting terrorist leaders for attacks on Russia." http://news.antiwar.com/2014/03/05/ukraine-protest-leaders-hired-kiev-sn...
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 27 weeks 4 days ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    Yes, I agree. This post was really very disappointing. It could have been posted by a neocon. Whenever I read something by someone who seems worried about military cuts, eyes glaze over
  • newjerusalemtimes's picture
    newjerusalemtimes 27 weeks 4 days ago Web link Bradley Keyes
    Gee, I don't think this is an accurate narrative, according to the rules of statist international law or treaty. I mean, I'm not endorsing Russian statism, or any other form, as all heads of State are thugs in a monopoly extortion scheme. But, I believe that the supposedly Autonomous Crimean Republic parliament did invite the Russia State to shore up security there, which it did without any bloodshed, before pulling out. Interestingly too, Vladimir Putin sent in Russian troops that wore no military insignias and no national flags on any of their vehicles, which made their presence immune from the Geneva Conventions and other international treaties. So, compared to the Bushes, Clintons, and Obamas, Putin is a clever and lawful statist thug. Take a look at the photos of the Russian forces that were temporarily posted around a few Crimean cities: no insignias, no flags. https://www.google.com/search?q=Russian+incursion+in+Crimea&client=safar...
  • Thunderbolt's picture
    Thunderbolt 27 weeks 4 days ago Page Paul Hein
    Please make it 4.
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 27 weeks 4 days ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    Yes, I almost forgot about the British controlling the cable communication. The episode with the Lusitania of course was very twisted. I believe that Wilson arranged for an advertisement placed by the Germans not to appear in the newspapers of New York. It would have warned passengers about the horrible cargo in that chip, which made it a viable target. Thanks for reminding me about that cable control.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 27 weeks 4 days ago
    Invisible Growth
    Blog entry Jim Davies
    Not just possible, but inevitable.   The process began based on several assumptions, nearly all of which have since proven sound. It now continues based on one key one which, by design, neither I nor anyone else can verify: that graduates of the Academy will (a) recruit one friend per year to take the course and do likewise, and (b) resign any government job they may hold, after learning their employer's true nature.   That assumption or premise looks very simple to me. Easier than anything I've seen Libertarians doing in three decades of observation. Time alone, of course, will tell; but the front cover of my Transition to Liberty shows a picture of an avalanche and its contents justify the illustration.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 27 weeks 4 days ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    Pretty darn good! And quite a mouthful, for our French friend to chew over during his flight.   Possibly, it's even better than you suggested; I refer to the timing in WW-I. As soon as it began the Brits lobbied strongly for US help, with a ceaseless campaign that took advantage of the fact that the only transatlantic cable came from the English coast - so the Germans were unable to match the pleading. By 1915 when the Lusitania was sunk - possibly with compiicity by Churchill - it was only a matter of time before the doughboys landed. This strong hope kept Britain in the war. But for that, the stalemate would have been formalized in 1916, before Wilson even got Congressional agreement to enter; millions of lives would have been saved and no German humiliation would have later propelled Hitler to power.   More yet: with a peace agreement in 1916, Tsarist Russia would not have collapsed in chaos in 1917, opening the door to the Bolsheviks; so Lenin's trip across Germany and Scandinavia might have taken place but would have had no particular effect. Hence, no Ukrainian (or German/Jewish) holocaust, no cold war, no Korea, no Vietnam.        
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 27 weeks 5 days ago
    Invisible Growth
    Blog entry Jim Davies
    Is it possible?
  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 27 weeks 5 days ago
    The Meaning of War
    Blog entry Jim Davies
    Wow, Jim: thanks for unearthing this "blog post" by Dr. Rush. It has real impact.
  • Glen Allport's picture
    Glen Allport 27 weeks 5 days ago
    Invisible Growth
    Blog entry Jim Davies
    I saw Gary's column too and thought the same thing you did, apparently: that churches aren't the only thing that could grow this way. I've always appreciated your efforts with TOLFA, although I'm very pessimistic about individuals understanding (or even being willing to learn about) freedom without twenty years of exposure to the ideas first. But Gary's column is working on that prejudice for me, and I'll keep TOLFA a bit higher in my mind regarding pointing others to your cleverly low-profile Academy. 
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 27 weeks 5 days ago Page Paul Hein
    I'll make it 3.
  • Lawrence M. Ludlow's picture
    Lawrence M. Ludlow 27 weeks 5 days ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    I would role play this: Yes, the American government should never have intervened under Wilson. If the government of the United States had minded its own business in WW1, the following benefits would have followed:   1. The Germans would not have shipped Lenin to Russia by way of Finland, taking one spark away from the Bolshevik phase of the revolution.   2. The United States government would not have bribed the Russian duma (parliament) with $26 million to remain in WW1 -- a war that the Russian people hated and were dying from (men sent into battle without weapons), dead relatives, no farm workers, etc. Again, this may have taken the heat away from the Bolsheviks -- ultimately saving as many as 50 million Russian souls under Lenin and Stalin.   3. The communist revolution in China may never have occured.   4. The Versailled treaty imposed by your nation of France (points to  man in airport) on the German as well as the ridiculous reparations and other vindictive measures would never have happened.   5. The U.K. and France would have had no decisive victory over Prussia and Austria.   6. The stalemate situation of WW1 would have petered out into a settlement with a few boundaries shifted, but no further conflict since both sides were exhausted and stalemated.   7. There would have been no Hitler, no Nazis, no WW2 -- and we wouldn't be having this conversation, and your boyhood would have been much happier, and the Zionists would not now be persecuting the Palestinians with their apartheid state of Israel -- a tinderbox of conflict in the Middle East. The wars in Central America, Iraq (both), Afghanistan, Libya, etc. would never have happened.   8. My country, the United States, would never have become a captive of the military-industrial-congressional-comples, the cold war would never have manifested, tens of millions of war victims would not have been lost, and the United States would not have become transformed into an Evil Empire bent on world domination.   9. Boeing and the other aerospace companies would still be able to build good passenger planes instead of living on government welfare and building wasteful, failing products because they were spoiled with cost-plus government contracts.   10. Millions of people in the United States would earn a living in productive occupation instead of "supporting the troops" with every silly breath!   11. France would still be a socialist nightmare...some things cannot be changed!   How's that Jim? That was a bit of fun!
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 27 weeks 5 days ago Page Paul Hein
    Seconded.
  • ReverendDraco's picture
    ReverendDraco 27 weeks 5 days ago Page Paul Hein
    What a wonderful example of "reductionem in salsus!" I hereby nominate you for the position of Honorary Professor of Sarcasm, PhDuh.
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 27 weeks 5 days ago Page Lawrence M. Ludlow
    Hmm. Perhaps we're the only two round here who fly. Okay, what say we role play?   You saw I was elderly, but now in my further reply you detect a French accent. It happens, in airports. I say...   "When I was a boy, my country was occupied by les boches - Germans. My father and his friends were able to help several English and Americain airmen across the Swiss border, and sometimes even I would assist, conveying messages and so on. So we French have good reason to be grateful to our liberators. What is this you are saying about 'statist interventionism'? I do not comprehend you."