Recent comments

  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 19 weeks 3 days ago Web link Westernerd
    It's my hope to live to see 7,500,000,000 (plus or minus a billion here or there) sovereign states. Feel free to come out to my state if you want to blow a reefer. But beware: I live on the border, and just across that fictitious line the narcs will incarcerate you for not only lighting up, but even possessing a joint or a bag. The late Carl Sagan had it in perspective: https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=23&v=jYtXoUZbUCQ He understood borders to be meaningless excuses to murder and kill. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 19 weeks 4 days ago Web link Westernerd
    The first step to achieving personal anarchy, as I see it, is to change my mentality -- my mode of thought. I have not "...empowered 'the police' to protect my rights..." Any police. Anywhere. I do not expect dangerously armed bureaucrats claiming possession of a phenomenon called "jurisdiction" to do anything other than attempt to interfere with what "natural rights" I might think I have. I prefer use of the term "choices under natural law" to keep my head clear from that inevitable swim back into the comfort of collectivist boilerplate -- but you suit yourself. Radley Balko writes some good stuff. But he is no anarchist. He believes police should be nice, good folks. Not. There is no way they could be. There is a natural degradation present in all monopolies. Monopolies can only come about by psychopathic interference in what should be a free marketplace. As I commented in a recent post: When all participants of a "system" are psychopathic, feeding from the same nose-bag, free from competition -- and are allowed (by your neighbors and friends -- hopefully not you) to • Make the laws, • Enforce the laws, • Prosecute the laws, • Hire the prosecutors, • License the “defense” attorneys, • Pay the “judges”, • Build the jails, • Contract jails out to private entities, • Employ and pay the wardens, • Employ and pay the guards, • Employ and pay the parole officers, One can't honestly call it a "justice" system. It's a system of abject tyranny. Abstain from beans, my dear friends. For the sake of justice. Don't empower the bastards by voting. Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 19 weeks 4 days ago Web link Westernerd
    John Whitehead is persistent about whining and whimpering over the machinations of collectivism and "the-state". I've never seen him suggest to his readers that they abstain from beans -- the first step in the alleviation of the condition about which he complains. Never trust a writer who habitually and incessantly uses the dangerous "we" word: "...Unfortunately, we waited too long to wake up to the government’s schemes...We did not anticipate that “we the people” would become the enemy..." I can't speak for "we". I began the awakening process well over 50 years ago, last time I voted or participated in a bread-and-circus presentation called "election". Liberty for me began to arise the day I-the-individual divorced we-the-people between my ears. "...We are fast becoming an anemic, weak, pathetically diluted offspring of our revolutionary forebears incapable of mounting a national uprising against a tyrannical regime..." Whitehead might be "...anemic, weak, pathetically diluted offspring of forebears..." So might you. I can't speak for John Whitehead -- or you. But I am not anemic, weak (well, at 81 I'm perhaps not as strong as I was at 40), or diluted "offspring of forebears..." I have no forebears that I know of. His final two paragraphs disclose him as a strong proponent of state. He just believes "we" must elect the right people. John Whitehead is not a friend of freedom or liberty. Sam
  • D. Saul Weiner's picture
    D. Saul Weiner 19 weeks 4 days ago Web link Westernerd
    Pharma has been fighting against the legalization of cannabis, perhaps the most medicinal plant on planet earth. It is also opposed to the legalization of psychedelics, which were once considered wonder drugs for psychiatry, and can be highly beneficial medically when used under the correct circumstances. Pharma is also working hard to remove exemptions for vaccines and expand the CDC schedule. Pharma is also working 24/7 to reduce access to other non-pharmaceutical treatments. Bottom line: Pharma is one of the great enemies of the free society.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 19 weeks 4 days ago Web link Westernerd
    Tell that to the BLM inspired mass murderers and the lone wolf jihadist assassins that have been plaguing us the last few weeks Mr. Whitehead. Clearly they didn't read your inspiring essay.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 19 weeks 4 days ago Web link Westernerd
    Small intentional communities built around a freely chosen belief system or life style is as close to liberty as we can accomplish at this point in history, says the author and I agree.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 19 weeks 4 days ago Web link strike
    If Hiltlery Clinton wins, I expect more or less the same response as Erdogen's. Not kidding fam.
  • rettafontana's picture
    rettafontana 19 weeks 6 days ago Page Retta Fontana
    Aaaaand there it is - the thieves can't keep their hands off of anything that moves. "Elizabeth Warren urges probe of Airbnb-type rentals" http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-congress-warren-housing-idUSKCN0ZT2WI
  • rettafontana's picture
    rettafontana 20 weeks 5 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    "FBI Director Comey is a board member of Clinton Foundation connected bank HSBC." Says it all! https://investmentwatchblog.com/fbi-director-comey-is-a-board-member-of-...
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 21 weeks 7 hours ago
    The Big Con
    Blog entry Jim Davies
    '...It was true (in 1776 as today) that governments exist - "are instituted" - but not one of them anywhere had as its raison d'être the task of securing those rights of the people they ruled - absolutely the contrary, in fact....' As is normal for you, Jim, this is an exceptionally insightful essay. I've ceased for many years the practice of the many political ("Independence Day", or "Cinco de Mayo") type propaganda events. As I posted a couple days ago, I see them as no more than reinforcements for the legitimacy of government -- their wars and and other egregious political actions -- including what was likely (how will any of us ever know for certain?) another of the ever-increasing false-flag events up in Dallas this week. I've felt (and so commented) for years that many of us neglect to take the Omni-propagandized idea of the "legitimacy of central political power" (a religion, in my opinion -- as well as the opinions of Wendy McElroy, Larkin Rose, and a number of others) back to its inception. Murray Rothbard alluded to it in his "Anatomy Of the State", his inspiration of which perhaps stemmed from his studies of our old friend, Lysander Spooner. What we perceive as "government" no doubt began back and long prior to the likes of Genghis Khan and even Attila the Hun. Early conquerors might encircle and besiege a peaceful city. In time they would breach the walls of the city. Once the struggle ended, the conquerors would proceed to rape the women. They would then slaughter all the men, women and children; leaving their carcasses to rot in the desert sand -- perhaps keeping as slaves those they felt would not impede their progress or exhaust their resources. After plundering the city, it would be left in burning ruins. The Huns and the Khans, and later the Washingtons and the Jeffersons and the Obamas, easily came to see this as wasteful of their greatest acquisitions -- human beings. Human beings, they readily perceived, were inflicted with what was only centuries later labeled "Stockholm Syndrome". They could easily be made to believe that their conquerors were also their protectors -- that they (the "protectors") were necessary and deserving of their support. Open any encyclopedia or history text and a major index page will be "flags" of various nations augmenting that mentality. Heads of state might be psychopathic, but they ain't stupid. Keep them cards and letters comin' in. The activities of voting and participating in political rolls as more-or-less "overseers", such as"senators", "congressmen", et al.; are symptoms of that debility, or religious practice. Most reading this have somehow been inspired to come out from under. Let's hope our numbers will grow to "critical mass" before our grandkids (25 of mine are on the ground, one due in August gregorian) and great-grandkids (just delivered my 6th) all grow to adulthood. The enormity of the truth is incredible. Sam
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 21 weeks 1 day ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    It's pretty normal for the ruling class to sneer at the peons. That helps them convince themselves that they are needed by the peons to survive - ignoring for the moment that the enstupidization of the peons has always been an important ruling class project.
  • Alex R. Knight III's picture
    Alex R. Knight III 21 weeks 3 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Insanity is indeed the social norm, it seems...especially in light of recent events, Sam.  England was spot-on.   I have contemplated the idea that "X" is a total phantom; a fiction created in the interest of stirring the Beltway hornet's nest while at the same time further rousing the public's ire.  Who knows?  We live in a time, as "X" himself alludes to, of nearly universal deceit (apologies to Orwell).
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 21 weeks 3 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    Excellent review, intriguing book. Who, who is Congressman X?   If (s)he is truly a sitting Dem, does he plan to get re-elected? - if so, he is seriously conflicted. If not, he's on a short list and his ID should not be too hard to spot. In any case, without re-election ambitions, why hide his identity?   Or if not, then who?  Pretty well anyone can call himself Congressman X, as a nom de plume. For example, Ron Paul. For example, any of dozens of talented libertarian authors including scores of Root Strikers. For example, Alex Knight...
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 21 weeks 4 days ago Page Alex R. Knight III
    '...“It’s far easier than you think to manipulate a nation of naive, self-absorbed sheep who crave instant gratification.”...' Governmentalists always write with the mindset that this thing has really gotten out of hand; but that the state will be okay and serve a socially useful purpose if the people will just get honest and forthright people elected to man the ship. But a state is necessary -- "we've" just gotta elect the right people. The hardware department at Wal Mart is my part-time "job" a few evenings per week. I work, not because I need employment, but because it forces me out of the house and on the bicycle in order to remain healthy, responsible, and mentally alert. 14 miles round-trip, hot, cold, rain, ice, sleet or snow. I've been car-free since my Dad died in 2008. Last Monday, July 4th, much of the evening was devoted to moving shoppers out of the south section of the parking lot (adjacent to a city park) to other sections in order to make way for a big fireworks display at 10pm, to be conducted for the hoi polloi -- launched from our parking lot. I got on my bike to ride home at around 10:10; biked alongside the ear-splitting rockets and through a crowd of the "self-absorbed sheep" described above, lined up on a hillside along the route I take home. I thought while I watched this crazy-making: how can sane individuals be convinced to go out, sit in chigger-infested grass, "ooohh" and "aaahh" over the aggrandizement of previous murderous wars, terminated (I presume) by a playing of a star-finangled banner of some sort. Sane people can't. Which is eerie when you give it just a little thought. Here I was, an 81 year-old veteran of the enslavement by murderous lunatics (draftee), biking AWAY from the traumatization -- a derangement the hordes were celebrating. Some of you old-timers will understand -- it never goes away. Even after well over 60 years I can't tolerate sudden explosions. Yet the self-absorbed sheep are trained to cheer them on. The late Delmar England had it absolutely right: insanity is the social norm. Sam
  • Kevin M. Patten's picture
    Kevin M. Patten 21 weeks 5 days ago
    Trump in Anaheim
    Page Kevin M. Patten
    Yeah, I do see his factories in Mexico as a bit hypocritical, seeing as he wants to "punish" any corporation that wishes to move their operations across the border. I think it was a 15% import tax or something like that. Have to check, but he's been pretty clear about it in his books. I guess it's because he's taken such a hardline approach on this front -- American corporations that have manufacturing elsewhere, and then endlessly criticizing the Chinese who are scheming against Americans -- that calling him out on anything seems like a reasonable thing to do. As for hiring undocumented workers (I didn't say "illegal" there, although I was using the words interchangably throughout the article) -- not conjecture, there's evidence. I didn't say they were Mexican though. Admittedly, this is a weaker point, as a business with a large work force can't possibly know where everyone comes from.  I likely wont vote either. But come on.....I've heard this theory about Hillary before...."she's so bad that she'll set something off." I think we can do that with Trump actually. And for right now, it's nice seeing the Democratic and Republican parties -- along with their media lapdogs -- shit themselves. I've enjoyed that.  I just finished reading Ilana Mercer's newly released book, "The Trump Revolution." I'm gonna type up a review and try to get it up here.  Thanks for commenting Paul. 
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 21 weeks 6 days ago
    Trump in Anaheim
    Page Kevin M. Patten
    "he has factories in Mexico" Not to defend Trump, but I fail to see how this is even close to hypocrisy. Owning a factory in Mexico, if anything, could be seen as one way to reduce the pressure of "illegal" immigration. As to his hiring "illegals" here, that is just conjecture, right? Your article is entertaining, and that is one function of politics if you ask me. I might vote for Hitlery, just because she is most likely to kick off a revolution or secession, something this country desperately needs. I might vote for The Donald, because he seems less likely to touch off a nuclear holocaust. But probably I won't vote, and maintain my habit of years now, to not support any scum who wants power over me.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 21 weeks 6 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    I didn't expend the minute to watch the video. Didn't need to. When all participants of a "system" are psychopathic, feeding from the same nose-bag, free from competition -- and are allowed (by your neighbors and friends -- hopefully not you) to • Make the laws, • Enforce the laws, • Prosecute the laws, • Hire the prosecutors, • License the “defense” attorneys, • Pay the “judges”, • Build the jails, • Contract jails out to private entities, • Employ and pay the wardens, • Employ and pay the guards, • Employ and pay the parole officers, One can't honestly call it a "justice" system. It's a system of abject tyranny. Abstain from beans, my dear friends. For the sake of justice. Sam
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 22 weeks 8 hours ago Web link KenK
    I for one would like to hear the backstory on this bit of info.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 22 weeks 3 days ago Web link KenK
    Yes indeed. The article sez the Austin PD is running stings against ride offerings on social media sites  cuz you know public safety.
  • rettafontana's picture
    rettafontana 22 weeks 3 days ago Web link KenK
    The headline doesn't explain the half of it. Never mind peaceful people agreeing on service and exchange. As always, the gummymint has driven business underground, increasing danger to drivers and riders. Now they'll start sending undercover cops to bust drivers giving rides to people privately. To hell with government.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 22 weeks 4 days ago Web link Westernerd
    Both your above comments regarding John Whitehead's commentary meet soundly with my agreement. 1) People, especially "anarchists", need to "...quit referring to it like it was a real thing...", like "it" was a living, breathing entity. I believe "libertarian" writers (quotes intended and necessary) need to spend a few hours reading the late Delmar England's "Mind and Matters" to learn how devastating to liberty the inclination toward reification amounts to. "Mind and Matters" is long, it's arduous -- difficult to comprehend. But, once I began (and learned to read between the lines to grasp the concepts) I could not put it down. I began to see why "libertarians" so often whine and moan and lament over lack of adherents to our "philosophy". 2) The concept of "rights" has generated much bickering and squabbling among us. To me, its use implies "jurisdiction" of some type that I do not believe exists. Therefore, I don't use the term. I could be wrong about that. I thought I was wrong once, then discovered my error. :-). But I agree with you -- "rights" are only what we agree to -- and can "enforce". The man with the loaded gun indeed has "rights" (or woman, L-rd have mercy). Sam
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 22 weeks 4 days ago Web link Westernerd
    I'll go ya one better, Ken: Since I am a sovereign state, of course, I'm prejudiced. I believe this pale blue dot upon which we all reside should consist of somewhere close to 7.5 billion sovereign states. That's billion, with a "b". You vote for you. I'll vote for me. Sam
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 22 weeks 4 days ago Web link Westernerd
    The only rights a person has are what counter parties agree to or what they can enforce themselves.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 22 weeks 4 days ago Web link Westernerd
    People need to quit referring to it like it was a real thing.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 22 weeks 4 days ago Web link Westernerd
    That hoary old parchement doesn't mean a fucking thing since about the time of the Whiskey Rebellion (1792).
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 22 weeks 4 days ago Web link Westernerd
    tl:dr  No, America should have 10,000+ local city-states with governance that suits their inhabitants wishes (whatever that may be) and no federal overlords to mandate a fucking thing.
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 23 weeks 6 hours ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Good thing Brother Hugo banned private gun ownership in 2013 isn't it? All those starving people being armed would be a real problem for the government otherwise.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 23 weeks 1 day ago
    Self Interest
    Page Paul Bonneau
    Your article smacks of my belly-button thesis: the world revolves around my belly-button, not yours. My world. The advantage of adhering to that premise is in the understanding that your world revolves around your belly-button -- whether you admit it or not. Therefore I can know that, if and when you and I disagree on a thing, it's not because you consider me a bad person -- or even a wrong person. It's just that the experiences, strengths and hopes you have experienced in your world have given you a different slant on the thing than those in my world. Each morning when I step out of my sovereign state and cross the border into the coercive state that surrounds me I encounter potential threats to my serenity. Police patrols, religious, political and altruism evangelists -- all soliciting my vote (or my "voluntary compliance"). The challenge of anarchy is learning to sidestep and circumnavigate those threats. And not getting bent out of shape each time I realize those folks are -- in their own eyes anyhow -- acting in their own self interest. As to reputation, I like the way Margaret Mitchel (who wrote "Gone With the Wind", then got herself hit by a car and died long before her time) phrased it through her character of Rhett Butler: "...Until you've lost your reputation, you never realize what a burden it was or what freedom really is..." ~Margaret Mitchell Gone With The Wind Sam
  • livemike's picture
    livemike 23 weeks 3 days ago Page Harry Goslin
    Doctor someone said Donald Trump was too angry a man to let in the White House and then quoted John McCain. Yes without irony or acknowledgement of the possibility of irony. Yes I facepalmed so hard I caused concussion again. No I can't come down to your office it's happened so often I've no idea where your office is. I have to stop reading about politicians.
  • Warren82's picture
    Warren82 23 weeks 6 days ago
    Who's Your Daddy?
    Page B.R. Merrick
    U2, best band ever, their songs are great to listen in any situation. "Daddy's Gonna Pay For Your Crashed Car" http://lyricsmusic.name/u2-lyrics/zooropa/daddys-gonna-pay-for-your-cras... a song and lyric that will always be relevant.
  • Darkcrusade's picture
    Darkcrusade 23 weeks 6 days ago
    Conceived in Tyranny
    Web link Westernerd
    Thanks Sam, i always so much enjoy every posting of yours and value your well thought out ideas expressed so crystalline. Which is why i invite you to that forum. We are simpatico on much. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6E2hYDIFDIU
  • rettafontana's picture
    rettafontana 24 weeks 3 days ago Web link KenK
    I'm so happy that I moved away from Michigan, specifically metro Detroit. I lived there 50+ years. When I visit MI, I am shocked at how bad the roads are, how much traffic there is everywhere and how nasty and depressed many people are. Also the property taxes are very high, car insurance is 5-10 times higher in MI than NC. Gas is almost a dollar a gallon higher than in SC where I get my gas when I can. I love NC! I wish I'd have moved here years ago!
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 24 weeks 3 days ago Web link KenK
    I am surprised that they even bothered to ask. Here in MI it would be "we're doing this, don't get in the way."
  • rettafontana's picture
    rettafontana 24 weeks 3 days ago Web link KenK
    I love it. The only thing I would have added would have been: "***If you have applied to other property owners in the State of Oregan, we will also require a copy of your applications and proof of payment to them. Thank you."
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 24 weeks 4 days ago Web link A. Magnus
    It's a good piece. My To Freedom from Fascism, America! has more.
  • A. Magnus's picture
    A. Magnus 24 weeks 5 days ago Web link A. Magnus
    "if everyone.is really losing so much faith in the system, then why do so many seem to become it's staunchest supporters when folks suggest scrapping the system in favor of liberty?"   Because the mind control is pervasive and built into the entire society; children are indoctrinated nonstop for 13 years in public schools. Television has subliminal advertising and propaganda built into the flicker rate of the image so the conscious mind doesn't register it. Americans watch on average 10 hours of continuous psychological programming every day. And propaganda used against American citizens by their own government is now LEGAL under US law. THAT is why otherwise 'rational' people are incapable of scrapping the system, because they have been programmed even in their subconscious mind to have unbending allegiance to it.
  • mjackso6's picture
    mjackso6 24 weeks 5 days ago Web link A. Magnus
    This really hits the nail on the head, but for those of us in the freedom crowd, it also opens up a maddening question: if everyone.is really losing so much faith in the system, then why do so many seem to become it's staunchest supporters when folks suggest scrapping the system in favor of liberty?
  • mjackso6's picture
    mjackso6 24 weeks 5 days ago Web link A. Magnus
    This really hits the nail on the head, but for those of us in the freedom crowd, it also opens up a maddening question: if everyone.is really losing so much faith in the system, then why do so many seem to become it's staunchest supporters when folks suggest scrapping the system in favor of liberty?
  • Jim Davies's picture
    Jim Davies 25 weeks 10 hours ago Page Harry Goslin
    Excellent article, Harry, well and tightly written.   Now, what are you going to do about the "further condemn[ation of] us to costly wars, bigger government and less freedom"?   I'm doing this. And this. And this. Might you join me?
  • rettafontana's picture
    rettafontana 25 weeks 1 day ago
    The Greater Evil
    Page Retta Fontana
    I appreciate the quotes.
  • rettafontana's picture
    rettafontana 25 weeks 1 day ago
    The Greater Evil
    Page Retta Fontana
    Thank you, Samarami.
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 25 weeks 2 days ago
    Self Interest
    Page Paul Bonneau
    'I think that the statement "there is no inherent drive to virtue" may be a bit of an overstatement.' Yeah, I probably went a bit overboard with that one. In our pre-"civilized" period - millions of years of tribal existence - a lot of what we call virtue probably was selected for, certainly culturally and maybe even genetically, since it enhanced survival of those who practiced it. But as you say, it is probably a fairly weak tendency.
  • D. Saul Weiner's picture
    D. Saul Weiner 25 weeks 3 days ago
    Self Interest
    Page Paul Bonneau
    It is a difficult and important topic to teach kids. I have struggled with it because, on the one hand, I don't want them to develop an unnecessarily dark view of the world around them and, on the other hand, I think that I must do so in order to protect them in certain respects. For example, if they do not understand the nature of our government, then they might just decide to sign up for the armed forces. In my case, that was a low risk for my daughters, but a more direct threat to them is misinformation on nutrition and vaccines, since they might otherwise make some mistakes with horrific consequences.
  • D. Saul Weiner's picture
    D. Saul Weiner 25 weeks 3 days ago
    Self Interest
    Page Paul Bonneau
    This is an intriguing article. Some of the ways in which our society is undermining virtuous behavior can be rather subtle. For example, Austrian economists have noted that the process of currency inflation alters our time preferences in such a way as to promote short-term thinking rather than the more desirable inclination toward deferred gratification. We also have an intellectual class that promotes a view of the universe and our place in it which may undermine our spiritual development. We also have government interventions into our diet and food system which are undermining our physical health which in turn also impairs our mental/moral development. This connection was noted by Weston Price about 80 years and was subsequently confirmed. I think that the statement "there is no inherent drive to virtue" may be a bit of an overstatement. I believe that most people tend to feel regret when they are doing something wrong, independently of whether they believe that their conduct will bring about negative repercussions. So I would consider that phenomenon to be an inherent drive to virtue, though clearly it is not strong enough for most of us to act virtuously much of the time.  
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 25 weeks 3 days ago
    The Greater Evil
    Page Retta Fontana
    Excellent article. "Eventually your special someone starts to apply gentle pressure to vote for her candidate." Not only with loved ones. I see it on gun forums all the time. They know their guy is scum, but they somehow imagine he is less scummy than the other, with no real evidence to support that. Sometimes I respond: "What if the voting rate went from its current low value, up to 100%. Would anything change? No, the world would be the same as it is now. Well, what if the voting rate went from its current low value, down to 0%? Would anything change? Yes, everything would change, because even if a government managed to form, no one would pay any attention to it, and people would have to interact voluntarily. So, why are you trying to get me to vote?" I like Mencken's take on it: "I believe that liberty is the only genuinely valuable thing that men have invented, at least in the field of government, in a thousand years. I believe that it is better to be free than to be not free, even when the former is dangerous and the latter safe. I believe that the finest qualities of man can flourish only in free air - that progress made under the shadow of the policeman's club is false progress, and of no permanent value. I believe that any man who takes the liberty of another into his keeping is bound to become a tyrant, and that any man who yields up his liberty, in however slight the measure, is bound to become a slave." ["Why Liberty?", Chicago Tribune, January 30, 1927] On the original question, I have a similar situation. Those I love are still in the matrix, although marginally it seems. For me the answer is to be patient with them. It took me forever to figure it out, and I think my son is vastly farther along than I was at his age, so the outlook is not so bad. Another quote might help: "My experience of men has neither disposed me to think worse of them, nor indisposed me to serve them; nor, in spite of failures, which I lament, of errors, which I now see and acknowledge, or, of the present state of affairs, do I despair of the future. The march of Providence is so slow, and our desires so impatient, the work of progress is so immense, and our means of aiding it so feeble, the life of humanity is so long, and that of the individual so brief, that we often see only the ebb of the advancing wave, and are thus discouraged. It is history that teaches us to hope." -- Robert E. Lee
  • Paul's picture
    Paul 25 weeks 3 days ago
    The Greater Evil
    Page Retta Fontana
    Sam, over on the zerogov forum we had an argument about "defensive voting" (e.g., voting against ballot measures such as a tax hike). Somewhat as a devil's advocate, I took the position that it is a bit much to criticize the defensive measures an individual takes against aggression. Even if the cost is a tiny increment of "legitimacy" granted to the ruling thugs, by participating, it is justifiable for a potential victim to avoid his victimhood with even such an ineffectual tool as a vote. If voting is meaningless, it doesn't much matter if you do it or not. Of course if one does so, it should be done without any blinders on. I'm still not sure my position is the correct one, or even if the argument matters at all (how many angels can dance on the head of a pin).
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 25 weeks 3 days ago Web link KenK
    I have never understood the snobs who turn up their nose at McDonald's & the people that eat there. McD's are usually conveniently located, have inexpensive food, free Wi-Fi, free drink refills, clean restrooms, and often a play area for the small ones to blow off steam as well. But "the food" you say? McD's food offerings are no worse that what people eat at home or anywhere else they go, just less expensive. McD's is an "evil multi nat corporation"? So who isn't any more? Ronald McDonald is stupid? Okay you got me on that one, so ignore the bastard. All these objections are just status signaling from dopes that don't know any better, and fuck them any way.
  • Samarami's picture
    Samarami 25 weeks 3 days ago
    Conceived in Tyranny
    Web link Westernerd
    If one is truly anarchist, s/he will indeed be an "uncommon (wo)man" Here's a link to a work by the late Delmar England: https://commonsensical.liberty.me/mind-and-matters-the-world-in-a-mirror... It's a long, difficult read. Difficult because England slings mud all over your idols, and you're not going to like that very much. But as a libertarian writer, he was indeed uncommon. He challenge us to examine "epistemology" -- how any of us come to know what we know. To understand the mind, how it works, how imbedded "beliefs" will effect the outcomes of my thinking. When I find myself whining and moaning about my "rights" being trampled, it is important for me to own why and how I got myself into this position. Much more. Once I get started with it I cannot put it down. Sam
  • Darkcrusade's picture
    Darkcrusade 25 weeks 5 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    Kenk , Right you are! http://www.coinflation.com/ Lincoln Copper Cent 1909-1982 Cent (95% copper) * $0.01 $0.0137817 137.81% Jefferson Nickel 1946-2014 Nickel $0.05 $0.0277938 55.58% Lincoln Zinc Cent 1982-2014 Cent (97.5% zinc) * $0.01 $0.0051587 51.58% * The U.S. Mint issued both compositions in 1982; they can be differentiated by weight (3.11 g copper, 2.5 g zinc). The 1943 steel cent is not included in the table above. Also, a tin alloy is used in one cent pieces from 1864 until 1962, but that value isn't significant enough to calculate. It cost 1.7 cents to make a penny this year(2014), and 8 cents to make a nickel. The loss on the production is added unto the "debt." http://www.usdebtclock.org/
  • KenK's picture
    KenK 25 weeks 5 days ago Web link Melinda L. Secor
    @Dark Crusade Are you sure? U.S. treasury pennies aren't pure copper any more for just that reason.